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Leaf Blower Problems


yardnut's Avatar
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08-10-02, 06:56 PM   #1  
I'm ready to throw my @#$%! blower in the garbage!

Okay - first let me say that this blower (a gas Ryobi) has been a major pain in my butt ever since my well-meaning father bought it for me 3 years ago. I have a heck of a time getting the stupid thing started - the engine just won't "catch". (I have no problems with my gas trimmer - and it's also a Ryobi.) As a result, I rarely use it. However, I planned to blow out my garage today, so I was determined to get it started. Well, I filled it up with gas, and went to pull the cord, and the cord would not budge. Not one centimeter. And I pulled HARD. I am seriously considering chucking it and just purchasing a new one. But before I do, thought I'd check in here to see if anyone had any thoughts about a quick fix. If I need to take it somewhere to have it fixed, then I'd just as soon throw it out. I'm over it. Any ideas? And if I should just get a new one, what brand should I get? I'd be going to Lowes or Home Depot - and I want something EASY to start for a change.

 
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08-10-02, 07:54 PM   #2  
mikejmerritt
Hello yardnut, I'm with you on the hard starting yard gear. I have a Weedeater brand FeatherLight blower and from the 3 month mark have had to remove the air filter and use starting fluid. What I would check first on yours is fuel on the cylinder. Do this by removing the spark plug and pulling the engine through a couple of times if it will. If this is no help you will need to verify that the engine is indeed seized. I havn't been in a Ryobi in a while but maybe you can get to the flywheel/starting pully area and make sure that the rope isn't snarled up in it. At this point you should be able to attempt to rotate the flywheel and if you can't, give it up. If you are lucky enough to get it rolling through the normal starting routine is prime with the bulb if equiped, full choke until it hits, half choke until running and no choke. Ryobi has a bad habit of flooding very easily (remember that possible fuel on the cylinder?) so you may want to try a no choke or half choke start as a last resort. I have never seen one run until it is turned off and be seized the next time out. As for what to buy, I have had great service out of Homelite, McCullough and the full size Weedeater (Poulan). A step up from those would be a Stihl or Husky. Be wary if shopping at Lowes, Troy Bilt is using Ryobi engines in there weedeaters and I look for them to do the same with blowers.....Mike

 
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08-12-02, 12:05 PM   #3  
Your post reminds me of a similar problem I had with a 2 cycle chain saw about a year ago. After a few months of inactivity, (the saw's, not mine) I attempted to start it only to discover that I couldn't pull the starter cord. When I removed the spark plug, I discovered that the cylinder was full of oil. Apparently the fuel mixture had leaked past the carburator into the cylinder. I turned the saw with the plug hole down and pulled the recoil a couple of times to purge the oil/gas, replaced the plug and cranked the thing right up. Any possibility this could be your problem too?

 
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08-12-02, 02:15 PM   #4  
I unplugged the spark plug also, and turned it every which way but loose, and nothing came out. And still not able to pull cord. I gave up (I don't have much patience when I need to get something done!) and went ahead and bought an Echo from HD - wow - it started right up, and starts unbelievable easy. To think I've been making a spectacle of myself trying to start that stupid Ryobi for 3 years. Sheesh.

 
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08-20-02, 12:23 PM   #5  
Well if you need someone to take the ryobi off your hands I'd be willing I've been looking for a new toy to get frustrated on.

 
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08-21-02, 08:14 PM   #6  
Too late - it's gone!

I placed it out by the curb with the trash yesterday morning, along with the manual. I was told that the trashman stood there reading for about 15 minutes before he decided to take it. It was full of gas too.

 
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08-22-02, 03:00 PM   #7  
GodsBeast
Re: Too late - it's gone!

Originally posted by yardnut
I placed it out by the curb with the trash yesterday morning, along with the manual. I was told that the trashman stood there reading for about 15 minutes before he decided to take it. It was full of gas too.


You missed a good chance to relieve frustrations, I had a Weedeater, that continuasly gave me problems. The last time it acted up I smacked it up against the telephone pole. I knew I was going to have to replace it anyway, but the joy of seeing all them broken flying parts!

 
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08-25-02, 07:35 PM   #8  
Oh man would that have been fun!

I'll keep it in mind for the next piece of junk that I end up disgusted with!!!

 
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09-04-02, 04:13 PM   #9  
Dino
This post brings up questions I have about two tools mentioned in this thread...

1. Blowers: What is the point? My neighbor has one of these things and I just don't get it. You fire that thing up, it makes that annoying buzzing noise and blows all of the dirt and dust from the nooks and crannies into the air....after which it settles back down on the ground, on the car, on the furnature in the lungs. Wouldn't a broom and dust pan more effective way to remove debres? Gently place it into a trash bag...minimal dust!

2. Weedeaters: When they were inventing these thing, how the hell did they know when they were finished inventing them? They never work right!!

 
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09-05-02, 02:37 AM   #10  
GodsBeast
OK Dino, I'll take a stab at it. 1st the reason for a blower, if you had as much concrete as I do to keep leaves from 6 great big, live oak trees from piling up under my Camper, Carport, around my vise area and patio area, I'd believe you'd be breaking the broom up against the telephone pole and doing a toss with the dustpan. I even bought 5 extra plastic trash cans for the fall, when these leaves start comming down, I even have to bag with my mower, into the winter, to pick up these leaves. So far as the dust, its all part of it, besides you get dust when sweeping and dumping the pan. OK I admit my neighbors know I LOVE CONCRETE, if it was a 100 dallors a yard it would be worth it, and I have plenty of it here, too much to be sweeping!

So far as the weedeater, did I mention I have fence around my whole yard, I also edge all that concrete with it! It beats grabbing down into a clump of weeds to pull them and catching poison Ivy, or snake bite, not to mention a sore back.

OK, tools are needed, they sometimes break, and tick you off, sometimes they need to be repaired, and sometimes it is just cheaper to replace it. I say, if you have to replace it, salvage what you can, and blow off steam with what you can't. With the job I have, I have to blow off a little steam, every now and then. I hope this answered your question

 
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09-05-02, 07:18 AM   #11  
For me, the blower is not as important as the weed wacker, but still, I find it very handy for cleaning out the garage. I could never get a broom around all that STUFF I have sitting in there (yes I do keep my car in there). It's just plain easier with a blower. And after I edge, the blower cleans up nicely. My trees are young yet, so leaves are not too much of an issue, but they will be in a couple of years. My weedwacker is indispensable. I too have a fence around the yard, and many, many beds that I edge to keep neat. Also I am on a large corner lot, so I have a LOT of yard to take care of. The only problem I have with my weekwacker is that the string often "melts" together in the head and I have to remove the assembly and re-string it - a real pain in the butt. I don't know if this happens with all trimmers, or just my jewel.

 
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09-05-02, 08:15 AM   #12  
Dino
I am in no way questioning the usefulness of the weedwacker. It's an indespensible tool - especially in my small yard. In fact I have some tight small areas where oftentimes I find it easier to "mow" with the weedwacker rather than jocky the lawn mower in that space. They just frustrate me because 50% of the time I use it, I end up making some kind of repair!

I can aknowledge that in many environments that a blower would prove useful...just not mine! The blowers annoy me simply because my next door neighbor has one and he uses it. We live in a neighborhood with small yards and the houses are fairly close together. It's a dry but mild climate so the windows are open most of the year, at least during the daytime. After my neighbor uses is blower to "clean up", there is literally a dust cloud in the air followed by a fresh layer of dust on the furnature and the cars (and everything else)

 
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09-06-02, 08:12 AM   #13  
GodsBeast
Hey Dino, Yardnut, I read your replies, Dino, I understand about the dust, I close all my windows when I "Do the yard thing" it can cause a whole new job, with dusting. The only advise I can give, is if your home to hear your neighbor start his blower up, Slam your window's shut, loud enough for them to hear, or if you want to start a war, turn a sprinkler on. If your leaving your house unoccupied, with the window's open, you must live in a good neighborhood, but I suggest that you give that some thought. Burgulars are lazy and pick the easy targets. Make them work for it an make some noise, (Like breaking the glass) which might alert one of your neighbors to call the police. Hopefully it might be the same neighbor with the loud Blower.

Yardnut, I found that using the larger green string in my WEEDWACKER keeps it from melting together, as you stated. The last one I bought is a lightweight Poulan, featherlight, automatic feed, and I use the heavy string in it, and I have not had one melt problem with it in over a year, which is when I bought it, (I am knocking on wood as I type this). In fact it feeds great, and really has not given me any problems. The best thing I can say about it is if it quit today, I'd smack it up and buy another one just like it!!

 
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