Governor bushing

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  #1  
Old 12-27-02, 06:19 PM
J A Boggan
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Question Governor bushing

I have a problem with a Briggs and Stratton, model #- 281707, type#- 0195-01, code#- 89032331. It has a bad oil leak toward the base. The best I can tell, it is coming from the governor shaft. Can't you put a bushing on the shaft? I haven't removed the engine yet...and I can't tell if it already has a bushing. I haven't had any luck at finding a part #. Also, will I need to ream out the hole for the bushing and a final reamer for the bushing?
 
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  #2  
Old 12-27-02, 06:46 PM
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There is a bronze bushing/guide that the governor shaft passes through from inside the block to the outside. It is pressed in. I have never seen one leak to any extent to mention, and never had to replace one. That engine, for a period of time, had problems with the crankcase cover bolts coming loose and letting oil leak between the block and the cover. Could this be where the leak is coming from? If so, the cover must be removed, gasket replaced, and blue locktite put on the bolt threads before reinstalling them to keep it from happening again.

Let us know what you find!
 
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Old 12-28-02, 04:57 AM
J A Boggan
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Thanks Cheese for the opinions from experience.
 
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Old 12-28-02, 10:08 PM
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Sure ! . Do you think that the cover bolts may be the problem, or have you determined that the gov shaft bushing IS leaking? I'm curious to see if that is what's wrong since I haven't run into it before. Briggs has corrected the problem of the bolts coming loose, but for a little while they made several 10 to 14.5 hp engines that were prone to do it.
 
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Old 12-29-02, 02:58 PM
J A Boggan
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I'll be sure and let you know. It still appears to be leaking oil from the govenor shaft...but I cant be absolutely sure untill I go into it further. Will proberly go into it in a day or so. Thanks again for your information.
 
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Old 01-15-03, 07:01 PM
J A Boggan
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Cheese,
When I got that B&S (model 281707) engine up on the table, the governor shaft does have some sideways motion in it. I've got big problems though. I drained the oil and it was "badly" diluted with gasoline. Could this be anything except rings? The engine would start and run fine. Another thing, the two pulleys on the shaft are held on the crankshaft by a bolt thats about 4" to 6" up in the shaft...and this bolt's head is off center so far that it's touching the inside of the shaft on one side. Making it impossible to get a socket on it. Do you have any suggestions that I could try. This is a I/C engine with a cast iron sleeve
 
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Old 01-15-03, 11:48 PM
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Don't worry....no big problems indicated by the diluted oil. The carb leaks. Fuel is slowly seeping past the leaking needle valve and draining into the cylinder. The best rings in the world won't stop the gas from going past them and into the crankcase. Rebuild the carb and you should be fine.

As far as the bolt, I'm thinking the only way to get it may be to cut the pulley off at the end of the shaft so that you can access the bolt head. OR...you may be able to grind the side of the pulley away in the spot where the bolt is touching to get some clearance for a socket. I wonder how that happened. Makes me wonder if the crankshaft threads are stripped/crossthreaded.

My bet though, is that you won't have to worry about any of this except for the carb problem. Fix it first, then clean the oil off the engine, and see if it leaks anymore once you put new oil in. The diluted oil gets so thin that it leaks out of places that it normally wouldn't. You know how much play is in the governor bushing, so if you think it's bad enough, then fix it. If you think it might be ok, then see what happens with the carb work and go from there.

Let us know how it goes!
 

Last edited by cheese; 01-16-03 at 12:31 AM.
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Old 01-16-03, 02:09 AM
J A Boggan
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Wheww...I was afraid that I had major problems. It seems that the extra gasoline in the cylinder would result in an over rich condition. Please explain, just how the gasoline is drawn into the cylinder. I just can't seem to picture whats happening. Also, wouldn't the diluted oil do away with any lubrication? Thanks for your help. This is indeed a great forum.
 
  #9  
Old 01-16-03, 04:54 AM
mikejmerritt
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Gravity Fed Fuel Systems...

Cheese has you straightened out on this engine but I will tell you how I explain this fuel anomoly. View it like the water tower that feeds your home. You have a faucet open and the water is pushed into your home by gravity. Close the faucet and no more flow. The fuel tank above the engine forces fuel into the float bowl and when the float rises and closes the needle valve all flow stops from the tank. This is how it should be. When you have a faulty float/needle valve that isn't closing completely the gravity fed fuel will continue to feed fuel into the bowl until full and from there it will go into the throat of the carb through the main orifice, flow past the intake valve if open and into the cylinder. From there, as cheese says, it will always leak past the rings, even on a brand new engine. If the intake valve is closed when the engine is stopped the fuel will build up in the carb throat and when you attempt to start get a massive, all at once flooding. The reason the governor bushing leak shouldn't be problem is at this time you have to much oil and it is thinned with fuel. Fix the carb, replace the oil and the natural negative draw on the crankcase will keep the oil from getting past the governor bushing.
Always keep the fuel flooded crankcase in mind when servicing small engines with float carbs !!!!!! Even if they have a fuel pump this can happen but not often. They are known for this problem and many an engine has been destroyed while attempting to service a "flooding" carb. The newer models have an electric control valve under the float that helps stop this problem but never assume this electric valve is working properly though they most often stick in the closed position rather than open.
Cheese, thanks for letting me butt in here with this little diatribe.....LOL....Mike
 
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Old 01-16-03, 07:53 AM
J A Boggan
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Thanks for the information. I've started a notebook on all these "problems". All the things I pick up here and in other forums is priceless because it isn't in any textbooks. It will be great help in the future.
 
  #11  
Old 01-16-03, 12:42 PM
J A Boggan
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The off center bolt, turned out to be dirt piled up on one side of the bolt. Just took a long screwdriver and dug the dirt out. When it was on the lawnmower, I was looking at it using a mirror. But when I got it off and onto my workbench, after a closer examination I could see the problem.
 
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Old 01-16-03, 11:56 PM
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LOL...I thought of asking that, but decided not to...hehe. The dirt has fooled me a time or 2 also.

Mike...that is a good analogy! I'll have to remember that one for the benefit of some of my not-so-technically-minded customers.
 
  #13  
Old 01-21-03, 06:26 PM
J A Boggan
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Let me ask one more question (maybe a couple). I rebuilt the carburator and it seems to be running fine. I was wondering, would it be a good idea to put an in-line gasoline cut off valve just in case? One other thing, this mower uses a "large one piece Flo-jet" carburator. With the carburator turned up-side down and with the bowl and float removed, there is a piece of metal (half circle) under where the float was. This piece of thin metal appears to be "staked in" in four different places. Should it be removed (like a welch plug) and does it have passages (under it) that should be cleaned. This is the first one (that I can remember) that is built like this. Any help would be appreciated. Incidentally, the engine is a Briggs and Sttraton, model-281707, type-0195.
 
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Old 01-21-03, 09:22 PM
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It can't hurt anything to install the cutoff. If the carb is working right, it won't leak though.

The half-circle you're talking about is a baffle for the bowl vent. Usually it doesn't require removal unless there is just a bunch of crud in the carb. It can be popped out, and when reinstalled, you use a punch to peen the aluminum edges of the housing over enough to hold it tight.
 
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Old 01-22-03, 08:36 PM
J A Boggan
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Let me ask you a question about a Briggs and Stratton needle and seat...part # 394681. It comes with two different needles, one with a Viton (rubber tip?), the other needle (which is shorter) is all metal, has a small rubber insert for the seat. My question is, can these two types be interchanged. If you can, which is the better choice, and why.
 
  #16  
Old 01-22-03, 09:16 PM
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I believe the smaller needle and seat are too small for the carbs made for the viton-tipped needle. Use whichever one was originally there. I think the rubber tipped nedle is a bit more dependable, but both do the job well. Coincidentally....the rubber seat in the package works well in tecumseh float style carbs. (when repairing small engines as a business, you'll likey accumulate several of these seats since they are much less common than the viton-tipped needle...so this is a good use for them).

BTW: use a Q-tip soaked with carb cleaner to clean the needle contact area of the seat. Sometimes soaking it doesn't quite get all the residue out of there and a Qtip works great.
 
  #17  
Old 01-23-03, 02:09 AM
J A Boggan
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Thanks Cheese for the valuable information. Absolutely, a great forum.
 
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