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Snowblower Question


igneramos's Avatar
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02-10-03, 07:14 AM   #1  
igneramos
MTD / Tecumseh HSK600 Kill Switch

I inherited an older MTD snowthrower from a neighbor who didn't have the patience to wait for it to be repaired. It has an HSK600 engine, I don't have the full number off the engine in front of me, but from what I remember it's HSK600 1627P 1224H.

Knowing little about engine repair, but being painfully curious (often well past the point of stupidity), I pulled the cowling off.

The first thing I noticed was that the lead from the engine to the kill switch/ignition fell right off. The ignition mechanism on this blower is the type where you insert a plastic key, and pull it to kill the engine. This ignition assembly is riveted to the cowling. I couldn't tell from the frayed ends on the lead coming from the engine whether there are one or two wires in that lead. Here's question number one: can anyone explain to me how the kill switch works on these engines, and whether I need to replace the switch with an identical one, or if there's an alternative I can use?

Question number two: Am I biting off more than I can chew here, or is this a reasonably easy project for a neophyte?

Thanks in advance.

 
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02-10-03, 09:59 AM   #2  
Joe_F
First thing I would do is call up Tecumseh and get a parts breakdown from them. They will send it to you if you ask them, call and ask for "Technical Services". The people there are pretty nice.

Your machine has a Tecumseh 6HP horizontal shaft engine. It is the same as the one my 1965 Craftsman, but just updated. (Mine is an H60). HSK stands for "Horizontal Shaft--Snow King". It is a specific engine for snowblowers.

Then you'll know what you are up against. Typically, when you spool down the throttle lever on that (it will usually say FAST or SLOW or show a rabbit and a turtle ), it grounds out the ignition conking the engine. The key completes the circuit and just prevents accidental or unauthorized use. A thief could order a new key and be on their way---it's more for accidental use by a kid or something.

 
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02-10-03, 10:31 AM   #3  
igneramos
Thanks for the info!

I don't remember a throttle on this machine. Is it possible that the engine's fixed speed with a 2 position choke?

 
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02-10-03, 10:57 AM   #4  
It's possible....I'm not very familiar with snowblowers though.

The kill wire should run as follows:

The coil has a spade terminal on it. The kill wire connects to it and runs to the kill switch. It connects to the kill switch and the kill switch connects to ground. If the body of the kill switch is metal, and it is mounted to metal on the engine, then the ground connection may be unnecessary as the switch is made to ground itself when mounted.

If there are any safety switches on the machine, the kill wire may run through them before going to the switch.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

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02-10-03, 11:42 AM   #5  
igneramos
OK, that's making sense. I'm cobbling together a better idea of how these things work.

Since the "key" is just a plastic plug, it's probably gapping the contact point on that lead from the coil, and when removed grounds out against the frame. So theoretically, when I get home from work, I should be able to fire the engine up with that wire disconnected...and if it fires up, then I know that there's a short in that key mechanism. Otherwise, it's back to the drawing board

 
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02-10-03, 02:16 PM   #6  
An HSK600 is a 3 HP, horizontal shaft, two cycle snow king engine. (just to clarify)

When you repair the connection, be careful how you route the wire. They have a nasty habit of rubbing on one of the cooling fins on the head. In time, the insulation melts and the bare conductor can short to ground. Just like pulling out the "key".

 
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02-10-03, 04:12 PM   #7  
Joe_F
HSK60 is a 6HP, 4 cycle, horizontal shaft engine:

http://www.tulsaenginewarehouse.com/...izontal/hsk60/

It is a specific Snow King (snow blower) spec engine.

 
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02-10-03, 04:32 PM   #8  
Yup, that's true. I just don't understand what that has to do with Igneramos'es HSK600.

http://smallenginewarehouse.com/product.asp?PN=HSK600

 
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02-10-03, 04:57 PM   #9  
Joe_F
Your post clarified it as a 3HP Horizontal 2 cycle.

It's not---the problems associated with a 2 and 4 cycle engine vary. Very few parts would interchange .

Anyhow, the suggestion of getting a breakdown from Tecumseh to see what's up and what can be serviced is the way to go....

 
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02-10-03, 08:10 PM   #10  
igneramos
Thanks for all the input - I determined that I am in fact getting spark, so that's not the issue. I did notice today that when I tried priming the engine, it sounds and feels as though there isn't any fuel flowing - so I suspect that a cleaning / rebuild of the carburetor is in order...which is, alas, more than I have time to commit to right now...

 
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02-10-03, 10:03 PM   #11  
Ok....first...the HSK600 is a 3hp 2 cycle engine. This is the engine stated to be on the equipment this thread is about.

The HSK60 is a 6hp 4 cycle engine. Very similar model #'s, but one zero makes a difference.

Igneramos....

Try squirting a few drops of fuel into the spark plug hole, then reinstall the plug and try to start it. If it runs for a second or two then dies, then you have a fuel problem as suspected.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

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02-12-03, 01:42 PM   #12  
igneramos
just for those interested...

i went the safe route and dropped the machine off at a local shop (and got home just before the blizzard conditions hit). when in doubt, turn to the experts.

got a call from the tech, he informed me that a) there were clogs in the fuel line, b) something in the primer mechanism was siezed, and c) the fuel in the machine had no flashpoint. no wonder it wouldn't fire. (i didn't even know it was possible for such a thing to happen - learn something new every day )

it's probably a good thing i couldn't get it started, though, as they found that the kill wire is shorted out, so i would have been panicking trying to figure out how to kill the thing.

thanks again for all the help - i learned a lot reading these boards, and probably would have been able to take care of most of this myself, had i more time (and a heated garage :P )

 
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02-12-03, 05:34 PM   #13  
Sounds like you had a few problems, huh? The flash point of fuel can change to the point that it doesn't fire easily. It still has a flash point, but not low enough to get it to ignite in the engine.

I'm glad it's taken care of!


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02-12-03, 05:43 PM   #14  
igneramos
but still - $60 out the door for a snowblower is well worth it. i only wish i'd had it back this evening when i dug out the 3 foot snowbank the plow left in my driveway

 
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