32cc gas blower choke

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  #1  
Old 02-19-03, 07:11 PM
Bishop
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32cc gas blower choke

I've got two 32cc gas blowers and they both are really hard to start, I can drip gas in to the intake and they both start and run great. I have rebuilt and cleaned both carbs, new fuel line, etc. Great compression at intake. They will not start by the choke lever alone,but if I put a finger over the intake without the gas drip they will both start. The factory choke is useless. Any help?
 
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Old 02-19-03, 07:17 PM
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Hello Bishop!

What kind of blowers are they? Do they have primers?
 
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Old 02-19-03, 07:32 PM
Bishop
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No Primer Bulb

Nope, these two do not have primer bulbs, I wish they did.
 
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Old 02-20-03, 04:57 AM
mikejmerritt
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I am beginning to think that hard starting on some of the newer 2 cycle engines is compression related. I have been attempting to check these as I get my hands on them and it seems that unless compression is at or very near full factory specs they can be hard to prime. Once primed and warm they start and work well. I have one of these little pests myself and have been pulling the filter and priming since it was 3-4 months old but I am determined to wear it out.....Compression is off 5%..,,.Could it be?......Mike
 
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Old 02-20-03, 08:30 PM
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Could be Mike. Usually I find that a good carb cleaning/rebuilding does the trick, and sometimes richening up the mixture a bit. A lot of these newer 2strokes have so many plastic pieces, that over time warping and mis-mating of surfaces occurrs and vacuum leaks develop. Sometimes you can't seem to stop them. Lots of these engines have plastic crankcase covers that develop leaks, Reed valve plates of plastic, intake/carb mount of plastic, etc...

Many times they aren't worth the effort required to fix the problem. Lots of times it is compression related. I've gotten to the point where I hate to mess with them, because they have so many problem areas. You might fix 10 with no problem, then one bites you in the rear and you wind up investing an hour on it just eliminating problems and still haven't gotten it fixed. Then, you are already knee deep in it and hate to give up after putting that much time in it, and you continue, thinking "hey, if I go ahead and fix it, I can at least get compensated for SOME of my time". Then, after more elapsed time, you finally figure out that the case is slightly warped or distorted, causing a vacuum leak or some mess like that. Hmm...I have a junked unit in the storage bldg that might have a good case on it...where does it end...LOL! All for a weedeater or blower that was $85.00 new.

I don't want to discourage you Bishop...That is not usually how it goes, but it can happen. If you want to figure out the problem, I will go through the entire process with you if need be. Clean the carb really well and inspect you fuel lines for tiny cracks, especially right where they connect to the carb. I think this is the place you'll most likely find your problem.
 
  #6  
Old 02-20-03, 11:53 PM
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Once you get it started, try spraying WD-40 or some other flamable fluid all around the mating surfaces such as where the carb bolts on and where the fuel lines connect. If there is a leak where air is being sucked in causing your engine to run lean then what ever you are spraying would get sucked in and you would be able to hear the engine speed up. Make sure you don't get any on the muffler.
 
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