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chainsaw problem


racer's Avatar
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04-30-03, 06:27 PM   #1  
racer
chainsaw problem

I was working with a guy cutting some wood today and he shut off his saw and it would not start again. He was reving it at a high rpm before he shut it off. There is good fire and I put gas in the spark plug hole and it will not even kick. Took the carb apart and cleaned it still wouldn't start. Has 30psi compression when I tested it. It seems to be harder to pull over than it should be. Took off the muffler to look at the piston and it looks really scraped up on the side. When I pull it over I can see gas getting buy the piston on the compression stroke lookin in the muffler port. I can also see what looks to be a little hole or indent in the center of the piston,should there be an indent there or is it a hole? What should the compression be? What else could the problem be? Does anyone have a piture of what the piston should look like and one out of a blown up engine all scored up?The saw is a STIHL model 044. Any help would be appreciated.

 
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04-30-03, 10:14 PM   #2  
Uh oh! The engine is shot. Sounds like he was running it too lean, or without oil or enough oil in the gas, or both. It will need a new piston, cylinder, and probably bearings in the crankcase to repair it. The piston should not have a hole or indentation, and should definitely not be scarred on the sides. Better be sitting down when you price up the parts! LOL!


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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05-01-03, 02:42 AM   #3  
racer
Thanks for the quick response cheese. I was pretty sure that I would need a piston and rings but can you bore the cylinder on the saw if it isn't too bad?

 
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05-01-03, 10:10 PM   #4  
I have never done it, or heard of boring a cylinder on a saw. You might be able to do it, but I don't recall seeing oversized pistons for saws. I don't even know if there is a widely-available machine capable of boring that small of a cylinder.

I would also reccomend changing, or at least inspecting all bearings. If it was run hot or lean, the bearings probably got galled, burnt, or loose.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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05-02-03, 09:58 AM   #5  
traditionally you don't bore saw cylinders....it can be done and oversized pistons used, but its hardly cost effective. Lots of time you can clean the cylinder up with acids and hones...unless there is serious scarring.

As has been mentioned..check your bottom end bearings...also, before replacing the top end, which is usually worth it...find out what caused the seizure. You don't want to do the job again.

 
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05-03-03, 05:11 PM   #6  
racer
I honed the cylinder and got a new piston and rings and put it together and it runs like a top. I fixed it for $150.00 in parts plus my labour charges. I have another question. How much do you guys charge for jobs like this? I don't know if I am charging enough.

 
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