Engine Rebuilding

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  #1  
Old 05-03-03, 01:52 PM
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briggs questions

First of all I would like to thank Mikejmerritt and cheese for responding to my last question. Now I have three other questions. First, at trade school I had changed the ring gear and the bendix on a 16hp vanguard that was on a ariens riding mower. When the kit finally came in there was a metal ring gear (the old one was plastic), a new plastic bendix, the bolts to replace the studs on the flywheel, a new clip to hold the bendix on the starter, and two roll pins. I was able to install everything with no problem, except I have no clue what the two roll pins are for. Can someone please tell me. Second, there is a little (about 1 1/2" by 1 1/2 ") electronic box held to the side of the starter with a cable clamp. What is this electronic thing for? And last, there is a 2" by 2" sqaure box that the fuel line goes to, then one line goes to the carburetor and another line goes towards the bottom of the engine. Where do this line go, and what is this square piece? The instructor said it is the fuel pump, is this right? One last thing, the instructor was talking about helping the students get jobs and he said he would place us in a job that he feels we would do best in. He was already preparing one student to go work on 16 cylinder detroit engines, well, since it is a diesel mechanic coarse and I have worked on just one diesel engine and fixed at least 10 mowers, I made the joke that he would put me in a lawn mower shop. He said that small engine mechanics make the same money that diesel mechanics make. The student that he was preparing to go to work was geting a job to work on large pogy boats. They use v16 engines. He would be making $40,000 a year working on the diesel engines just starting out. Do lawn mower mechanics make this kind of money??????
 

Last edited by mower17; 05-03-03 at 02:54 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-03-03, 02:17 PM
buttlint
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Mower,

Dont say things like, $40k a year for mower mechanics. I am getting far to old to laugh that hard! Maybe in never-never land they do, but not in Michigan.

po' but proud, 'lint.
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-03, 03:12 PM
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About how much do they make? Also, I won't be getting married (don't have the patients) so I will be by myself and in a small house. Lets say I would go work on those pogy boats and make $40,000 a year, then after about one year move up to $50,000 a year, can someone give me an idea of how many years it would take for me to buy a house with cash? Would I be able to live without worrying if I need to start unscrewing light bulbs to save money? I am only 17 so I don't know anything about money, or life expences. Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 05-03-03, 04:46 PM
buttlint
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Mower,

Apparently it is to late for, "stay in school and dont take drugs".

If you can't do the math yourself, I suspect it will take you about 60 more years to save up enough doe to buy a house, no matter what your yearly income is. (If you want indoor plumbing, it may take longer.)

I make about $10k a year wrenching and another $200,000 answering questions in lawnmower forums. I would make more but I take a weeks vacation in January, to keep the wife happy.

Hope this helps, 'lint.
 
  #5  
Old 05-03-03, 06:31 PM
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Yeah, I took the GED route (in a school of 200 students, when one person doesn't like, nobody likes you) and hope to be on the job by 19 years old. That's another thing I love about trade school, no a**holes. Just people like 'lint that make you laugh day in and day out. Nobody really talks about money much so it is kind of hard to get an idea what is good and what is bad. I do remember the teacher said a beginning mechanic can expect to start out at $8 to $12 an hour plus overtime. But with insurance, food, taxes, and other expences, I get lost.
 

Last edited by mower17; 05-03-03 at 07:47 PM.
  #6  
Old 05-03-03, 07:04 PM
buttlint
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Mower,

Its a job. It last from one day to the next. You make what you can earn. Blow your cool with a service manager, customer or fellow employee and you find yourself knocking on another door.

You start at the bottom and hope someone is willing to help you out. You dont drag personal baggage into the job- People have problems of their own.

You show up everyday and do what the job demands. No excuses. The worst wrenches, seem to be the best BS'ers. Learn to keep your mouth shut and listen.

I'll let the a-hole comment slide. 'lint.
 
  #7  
Old 05-03-03, 07:45 PM
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Well said. Just in case you took it the wrong way, I wasn't refering to you when I said a**hole, I'm in no possition to say that about you. I have saw several jobs where employees didn't get along with the shop formen and left, only to be a deckhand on a boat. However, I enjoy getting dirty and learning how things work. Thanks for replying to my question.
 

Last edited by mower17; 05-03-03 at 08:02 PM.
  #8  
Old 05-04-03, 03:17 AM
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Hi Mower!

Don't go thinking you'll strike it rich in the repair field, lol. It is a modest living for most. If you own your business, you can do well, but it takes lots of patience, hard work, aggravation, experience, and people skills to do it. (trust me, I know). God has blessed me by allowing my business to grow rapidly in the past 5 years, but others in my area haven't fared as well. It can be a tough trade sometimes. $40K a year is not the best, and not the worst. Depending on the cost of living in your area, it could be really good. Most people don't make that much in my area. I know that when you are 17, 40K sounds like an incredible amount, but you'll soon find out that it really isn't as much as you think. It is good though, especially for starting salary. $40K a year for a person who is single and has no dependents is really quite a bit.

The diesel mechanics I know generally make more $$ than the small engine mechs. I know a diesel mechanic who works for Barlow world (hyster) who makes (I think) $26.00/hr, $100.00 per weekend on call, wether he gets called or not, time and a half when he does get called, and double time on holidays if an emergency arises and he must work.

The best tips I can give ('lint already covered most everything) are: learn how it works, 'cause if you know how it works, you can figure out what is wrong with it. Do the best job you can reasonably do. Do the work that the other guys don't want to do. Stay clean cut and use good language (even if the BOSS doesn't). These things are important to an employer when it comes to the question of "Who do I want to invest in?"

Hope that helps a little!

BTW: The roll pins are for a different style starter that Briggs uses. The square with the fuel lines IS a fuel pump, and the box on the starter is not supposed to be mounted there. It sounds like the voltage regulator, but that is usually mounted on the engine next to the starter rather than ON the starter.
 
  #9  
Old 05-04-03, 06:17 AM
Joe_F
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Mower:

The guys all gave you good advice here. I suspect I'm just a bit older than you are at 32 . I've been putzing and repairing since I was five years old and old enough to help my dad, who was fortunately very handy, but self-taught. Unfortunately, my dad died when I was around your age back in 1988. There went my mentor .

I broke into the "business" so to speak by helping my neighbor, who was a former accountant by helping him after school. My goal was to land a job after college that was automotive related, yet had a white collar atmosphere. I truly enjoy wrenching as a hobby and the challenge of fixing something always intrigues me. While I was with my neighbor (a total of about 7 years), I soaked up all I could and asked questions, and did more and more on my own cars. I also learned the parts systems of most OEM and aftermarket companies. When I landed a job in the parts industry, that end of things was a breeze. It still is. LOL. I get new OEM software or parts systems for the job and they all come naturally because I took the time to understand it when I was in the field .

I found that job I sought with determination and many weeks of looking in the New York Times. At no point in time did I think about quitting school to go work, however I did work part time when going to school. I continued on for my MBA after I got hired in my first "real" job and finished at night while working full time during the day.

My advice to you is to stay in school, stay current with your education and read and read. As Cheese said, take those projects on to learn on them and figure them out. Surround yourself with good quality friends and do things for each other. I still do projects with my friend I met in college, as he is much like me in the way of doing it yourself is often the best way.

As Cheese said, be respectful. The machine you work on could be someone in your family or belong to a friend. Act professionally, and break the stereotype that us guys that repair things are just "greasemonkeys". I challenge that, and name the people that tag us (and I'm not even in the industry, but I take offense to those that make such comments) as that. Working on a machine is akin to working as a doctor diagnosing a problem with a patient. Same logic, same type of diagnostic ability and plan for treatment. While saving a life might be more important than saving a 200 dollar Craftsman from the scrap heap, if you do a good job, people will respect you for it.

Also using foul language around is bound to turn off the potential hottie who shows up at the shop. She might think you're cute if you're one above the pack. LOL. Anyhow, keep a clean appearance and act like a respectable person. I used to go for a test drive with people and my neighbor would get, "Where did you get that respectable and clean cut kid you've got working with you???"

I once stopped into the local small engine repair shop for parts and got talking to the owner, who got the business from his father, and now he and his mother still run it. (I surmise that his dad passed away). After talking with me for a while, he and his mother looked at me incredulously, and said, "How do you know so much?". While I could have said magic, I said "DIY.com"! LOL.

Honestly, I told the guy that with enough research and logic, you can figure this stuff out, and who makes for who and who buys from who. At that point he called me behind the counter to show me his new Tecumseh Parts System (PartSmart), and said, "Well, I'll bet you don't know who AYP was before they started supplying #917 prefix mowers and equipment to Sears!" I said, "Sure, they were #131 prefix Ropers, which AYP bought and AYP is Frigidaire, and they are owne by Electrolux AB". After his mouth dropped, I also told him that #143 prefix engines were Tecumseh and how #706 prefix toolboxes at Sears were Waterloos, etc.

He said, "I need a parts man here. Want a job? Geez, no one
comes in here knowing that!" LOL.

Good luck to ya.
 
  #10  
Old 05-04-03, 10:54 AM
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Wow, ya'll sure do have a lot of good advise. When my dad would tell how to be a good worker and what bosses are looking for, it would all go in one ear and out the other. But when I started trade school, the teacher started explaining things like "don't take personal problems to work" and "put out your best because if you don't, there is someone else behind you that will" and "the world is full of dogs, they're all hungry, and if your not careful, they will eat you up". That got me thinking that maybe my dad (which is a boss on a rig and has been in the oilfield all his life) new what he was saying, and when I started listening, he had good points to make. Thanks for ya'lls advise. I won't forget any of it.
 
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