starter or battery problem

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  #1  
Old 06-24-03, 01:30 PM
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Murray 14.5 hp starter/battery

Model 42590X92A
Serial # 7374712781Z00148

Click when trying to start. Started just turning slow a few times then starting. Battery ( 2 months old ) seems to have plenty of power. Checked all wiring going to starter, all seem tight. BUt, the starter wire and starter felt hot. Replaced the solonoid with a new one. Previous owner had been starting it by crossing the solonoid. I wired the new solonoid the same way he had the old wired. It is the kind with two big posts and one small spade terminal. Red from switch going to the left post with the battery cable, red going to starter on the right post, orange wire going to the spade connector, and a black wire under one of the bolts holding the solonoid on. Is this correct. I think I may have starter problems. Maybe I need to check the starter gear and flywheel teeth. Comments?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-24-03, 01:52 PM
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A hot wire is tipically a sign of resistance. One way to test the wiring is to take a set of jumper cables and connect the negative clamp to the engine block near the starter and connect the other negative clamp on the battery. Then try starting it. If it still acts the same way, then you have to check the positive. Connect the clamp on the positive side of the battery and the other clamp to the input side of the solenoid (the side that the wire coming from the battery connects) and try starting it. If it still has the same problem, the disconnect the clamps, then connect on clamp to the bolt on the starter where the red cable hooks to and then connect the other clamp to the side of the solenoid that the wire connects to that goes to the starter. Try starting it again. If it still acts up, then the wiring is not your problem. But if the wire felt hot as you said, it could have an internal break which would create a lot of resistance or a dirty connection could also cause high resistance.
 
  #3  
Old 06-24-03, 05:49 PM
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Hello: boman

Also possible the starter is defective. It can be removed and taken to any local small engine repair shop or lawn mower shop to be tested. Locations will be listed in the phone book.

Regards & Good Luck.
Web Site Host & Small Engine Forum Moderator. "Accurate Power Equipment." Small Engine Diagnostics Services & Repair.
 
  #4  
Old 06-24-03, 06:52 PM
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I think I may have starter problems

I think I was right on this. I removed the starter and spun it by hand, and felt like it had some rough spots on the bearings/bushing. Although, when I rechecked my wire connections, I did find one on the solonoid I tightened a little more. It was the starter itself that felt hot ( too hot to hold long by hand) more so than the wire going to it. I did drop just a drop of 3in1 oil on the shaft and cool it down with water on the outside and let dry, seemed to help. But , still get a kind of click now and then. I will propably see about getting it rebuilt.
The guy that had it cut his and others' grass for 5 years. I'm betting it is time for a new or rebuilt starter. I did have to do some work on the deck.

TX
 
  #5  
Old 06-24-03, 11:05 PM
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A new starter for a briggs engine is $125 dollars ($117 without tax) in my area so it is an expensive part. The bushings do wear on the side opposite of the engine because the starter tends to want to kick out away from the engine. Rough spots on the bushing is a very bad thing. Sometimes, dust from the brushes come off as they wear and gets stuck between the brushes and the commutator and that reduces the flow of electricity and will cause a starter to spin slower and not want to start an engine. If you are up to it, you could take the starter apart and clean it. That black dust tends to get everywhere. Changing the brushes is a really easy and straight forward process.
 
  #6  
Old 06-24-03, 11:45 PM
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Hey Boman...everything I have read here so far is accurate...I just want to add one thing. Those OHV engines can get hard to start sometimes, because the valves get too loose. The compression release does not work properly when the valves are too loose, and the starter is not strong enough to spin it when this happens. Often times, people keep trying until it does manage to start, and eventually the armature in the starter burns up or begins to come apart and the starter goes bad. Make sure your valves are set properly when you get the starter straightened out so that you don't burn up a new or rebuilt starter.
 
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