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briggs trouble


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11-19-03, 08:47 PM   #1  
briggs trouble

Hey Cheese, today I worked on a pressure washer and when I turned it over, I noticed that the gas I poured into the carburetor would shoot out the intake, so after checking the valves, I noticed that the intake valve was stuck wide open. I removed the head then removed the valve and cleaned it. It had carbon all over the valve stem. The teacher said that I didn't have to remove the head to unstick the valve, is this true? After all, I did want to check to see if the valve seat came loose. I was wondering, what would cause a valve to stick like this? Also, there is a small spring way at the bottom under the tank that pulls the throttle linkage back to the idle position. It came off and I have no idea where the end opposite of where it connects to the linkage was hooked. There was so many springs and linkages that I didn't remove any so I have no clue what it was attached to. No matter where I hook it, it doesn't opperate correctly. I will see if it is shown in a diagram in one of the manuels at school. The engine is, I believe, a 5 hp briggs i/c. Thanks for the help!!!!


Last edited by mower17; 11-19-03 at 09:04 PM.
 
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11-19-03, 10:01 PM   #2  
I'd bet that if the intake valve is sticking due to gummed up valve guides that someone hasn't been servicing the air filter or changing oil very often.

 
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11-19-03, 10:34 PM   #3  
Hi Mower17!

A lot of times these valves stick in the open position if that is the position the valve was in when the engine stopped, and it was stored with no use for a long time. Especially if it was stored outside. Carbon and bad oil can also contribute to this.

It sounds like you are describing the governor spring. The governor spring should connect to the governor arm and to the hole in the piece that moves behind the tank bracket when you change throttle position. It has a hooked over tab with a jole in the end. Some don't have a hole but have a notch instead. The spring connects to this notch/hole.

Hope that describes it well enough. Let me know if not, I'll try to find a diagram or something.


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11-20-03, 04:08 PM   #4  
Well, I spent the entire day on that darn pressure washer. I went to start it at noon time and sure enough, it would still blow the gas I poured into the intake right out of it. So I pulled the carburetor and gas tank back off(this makes the third time ) and I checked the valve clearances, which I should have done in the first place, lesson well learned. Then I cleaned the carburetor and the gas tank. The tank had a large sponge in it. What is this for? Any way, it was dry rotted so I pulled it out and the tank was FULL of rust so I steam cleaned it, shook some bolts in it, and steam cleaned it again. I also filed a little off the intake valve. One question I am wondering is, at certain positions of the 4 strokes, the 0.005" feeler guage wouldn't fit even though the exhaust valve was fully open. Then I turned the engine over a little more and all of a sudden, the 0.005" feeler guage would fit perfectly under the intake valve. Any thoughts why it would do this? Well, then I put everything back together and I will try it again tomorrow. I did notice that the engine was dated February 7, 1990. It looks like it been kept outside quite a while, plus it is owned by the state so that gives you a good idea how well it has been taken care of. Do you think that it will continue to blow gas out the intake? It really was disapointing since getting to the valves is time consuming. The gas that was in the tank stunk the varnished gas very strong, so I hope that was one of the problems. Also, I finally figured out where that spring goes. One last question. Since I had to remove the head and half the gasket was stuck to the head and the other half to the block, is there any other way of sealing off the head by means of a gasket compound or home made gasket other than buying the correct head gasket? The reason I ask this is because since it is owned by the state, I have a feeling that getting the head gasket will take a very long time. Will it start for now if I just put the head back on with the gasket sort of messed up? Thanks for the help so far. I can't wait to hear your reply and get that thing started!!!!!!!

 
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11-20-03, 09:34 PM   #5  
The foam in the tank is for dampening fuel sloshes...to keep it from sloshing around in the tank and leaking out the cap. It's ok if it's missing. It has benefits in go-kart engines and things like that, but not as much in a pressure washer.

The head gasket needs to be replaced, but you will probably be able to crank it up and check it out with the old one.

There is one main spot on the cam that allows proper valve clearance. Rotating the engine just a little will rotate the cam just enough to close the gap. The feeler gague should only fit right when the lifter is on the side of the cam directly opposite of the lobe. As soon as the cam rotates just a little, the lobe starts taking up slack and then lifting the valve.


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11-21-03, 01:54 PM   #6  
Well, I spent 4 hours on that same old pressure washer. That makes it five times that I remove the carburetor, muffler, gas tank, and valve cover. So far today, I redressed the intake valve since it was pitted, I lapped the valve, and I readjusted the clearance to spec. And it is still pushing air very forcefully out the intake. The teacher flat out refuses to help me so I am stuck. I watched the valves as they opperated and they closed and open at the right time. Help!!!!!!! The only two other things that I can come up with is either a crack in the block between the ports or the engine is out of time. The gas that I poured into the intake shot out about three feet straight up out the intake. Do you think that the valve seat needs to be redressed. The book calls for 30 degrees on the intake valve and seat. The seat wasn't pitted. I am totally lost on this one.

 
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11-21-03, 03:20 PM   #7  
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Is the valve seat loose?

 
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11-21-03, 04:16 PM   #8  
Sounds to me like the engine is rotating backwards when you pull it...OR...the cam is out of time.


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11-21-03, 07:12 PM   #9  
The valve seat is not loose. I checked, the rope is wound the correct way. When the piston goes down, the intake opens, then closes on the up stroke. How could the engine get out of time? Could it get out of time on it's own or would someone have to had taken it appart and not timed it correctly? Thanks!!!!!!!!

 
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11-21-03, 08:38 PM   #10  
If you suspect that the intake or exhaust valve is not closing you can try this test. It may sound a little wierd and probably isn't for the squeemish but with the intake valve closed, for example, you can put your mouth up to the intake port and blow. If the valve is seating it will hold your air. You can feel any leaks immediately. I've tried the same test using a mighty vac hand vacuum pump and sometimes can get useful results. For the more scientific bunch you can use an air compressor and gauge set to do a leakdown test that will also reveal any leaking valves. This method is commonly done on aircraft engines during an annual inspection. The biggest problem is that you have to find the exact top dead center or hold the crank shaft to keep it from moving during the test. That isn't a big problem with an aircraft engine because you just hold on to the prop. I suspect it isn't done more commonly on other engines because of this small problem. The test WILL reveal very quickly just how good your valves and piston rings are. You can also use some soap bubbles to find cracks in the block or defective gaskets. I usually try the 'breath test' only to confirm an obvious bad valve or seat or when I'm too lazy or to gather up the proper equipment. Be sure you have an ample supply of breath mints if you want to blow on an exhaust port though! An internal combustion engine is just a big air pump and should hold a reasonable amount of compressed air for a reasonable time. You can't produce anything resembling compressed air with you lungs so the 'breath test' isn't recommended. Besides, you will look wierd holding up that 5HP B&S engine to your mouth!

 
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11-22-03, 12:53 AM   #11  
When the piston begins its' upward travel on the compression stroke, is the intake valve fully closed, or is it still open?


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11-22-03, 08:36 AM   #12  
Thanks for the help so far!!!!! Yesterday I noticed that the intake valve stays open only for a very very small amount of time while the piston is JUST starting to come up, then it is closed for the total upward stroke which is why I am totally lost. Could the intake valve be held up off of it's seat just enough to lose compression but not enough to see just by looking at it? I mean, there isn't just a small puff of air coming out the intake, there is probably as much or more air coming out the intake than there is coming out the exhaust. I did notice that a good strong burst of air was coming out the pcv valve so I disconnected it and put my finger over the spot where it connected to the carburetor and there was still a good burst of air coming out the intake. I keep thinking it is obviously the intake valve, but as far as I can see, it is seating properly and there is the correct amount of clearance under the stem. A retired diesel intructor once told me something that made since. He said, "that engine isn't smarter than you", but it sure is good at fooling me!!!!!!!! Thanks for any advice you can give me. That little briggs is getting the best of and it sure is aggrivating.

 
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11-23-03, 12:05 AM   #13  
Apparently the valve is not fully closing. The valve stem could be bent, the seat could be warped or distorted or the valve could be burnt, etc... It does sound like it is in time though. Have you removed the valve and looked at the stem? It could be gummed up or galled, pitted, etc... Sometimes a valve will open and close properly when ratating the engine slowly while watching, but if the valve stem is sticky, it may not operate well when the engine is rotated quickly. Also check to be sure the head gasket isn't distorted enough to be hanging under the valve.


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11-23-03, 09:26 AM   #14  
I had removed the valve and buffed it clean. The stem it a little ruffed up with some pitting. I rolled the valve and it doesn't appear to be bent. Is there any way of pressuring up the cylinder to check the valve. I don't have a leak down tester. I might try redressing the seat cause it looks like it has some wear. When sliding the valve back and forth, it does have some resistance. How easy should it slide back and forth? Thanks for helping me out. I really appreciate it!!!!!!!!

 
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11-23-03, 08:26 PM   #15  
When you lift the valve up and let go, it should just fall quickly back down into the guide...all the way...without pushing it. There should be no resistance. If there is, something is wrong. Look at the stem...does it look like it is shined up on one side and not the other? That is a sign it is bent. It could be bent only thousandths of an inch and you wouldn't be able to detect it by rolling it. You can pressurize the cylinder with an airhose and either a rubber-tipped blower or the correct adapter to plumb the airhose into the plug hole. Then listen for where the air is leaking out.


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11-24-03, 05:25 AM   #16  
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Check the flywheel key! It may be cracked which will cause the timing to be off.

 
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11-24-03, 09:48 AM   #17  
jlm
Does this engine have a compression release for easy staring? It may be the reason for the intake valve slightly opening just before TDC.

 
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11-24-03, 02:02 PM   #18  
Well, today I sanded inside the valve guide and sanded the valve stem and it now falls freely. I even redressed the valve seat. But there is one thing I noticed. When watching the intake valve very closely, I saw that when the piston it half way up on the compression stroke, it is open very slightly. Then when the piston gets half way to tdc, the intake valve drops down all th way. However, even with the piston on tdc with clearance under both valves, I poured diesel into the intake port and right away the diesel leaked out the valve. The teacher told us in the past that you could to three and if it didn't leak in those three seconds, then it is good. Well, the exhaust valve leaks on the third second but the intake valve leaks the second I pour the siesle in. I know it has 0.007" of cleanance which is what the book said, and the valve doesn't have any visual damage and the valve face is ground and lapped and the seat is lapped. The book called for 30 degrees and that's what I did. The teacher told me he wants me to figure it out myself, but I tried EVERYTHING that I know. The valve isn't cupped. The only thing that I can think of is either the valve isn't seating flat of the seat is ****ed to one side. HELP!!!!!!!! Thanks again!!!!!!

P.S. I don't know if this engine has a compression release.

 
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11-24-03, 08:36 PM   #19  
You need to replace the valve. My bet is this scenario happened: The valve got stuck some time in the past. Someone tried to tap the valve back down. It took some pretty good licks to get the valve back down, but the valve got freed up. Those good licks are what bent the valve. The end of the valve rocked over just enough to stop it from seating. Seen it many times. The pitted valve stem is a good supporter of my theory.


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11-24-03, 10:38 PM   #20  
Cheese, you are an absolute genius. Can you please explain to me what causes these pitts and why they would appear from normal use and/or hitting the valve like you said. Both the valve stem and the top head of the valve have pitts. Unfortunetly I am off for thanksgiving and I won't be able to touch the pressure washer until next monday. I rushed today to do as much as I could but I was only able to do very little to the valve since I tried just about everything else. I can't even begin to thank you enough. How you learn all this stuff is far beyond me. Thanks again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
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11-25-03, 06:11 AM   #21  
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Without seeing the valve I would suspect the pitting to be a result of stem shock, as Cheese pointed out, corrosion or a manufacturing defect.
Since, you are attending a small engine course I am surprised you are not using a leakdown tester. The leakdown tester is an essential tool in troubleshooting small engine problems. The other thing your school should have is a dial indicator and V-block. To check a valve, the valve stem rests securely in the V-block and the dial indicator is used to check run-out of the valve seal area while you rotate the valve in the V-block. This will quickly show you a bent valve that is not visible to the eye.
Cheese is right on with replacing the valve. Good luck, Doc

 
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11-25-03, 11:09 AM   #22  
Believe it or not Doc, I am in a diesel mechanic coarse, I just get the "lucky?????" opportunity to always work on small engines. I have overhauled three diesel engines in my time over there. The last one was a four cylinder detroit engine used in the oilfield. After my lazy partner and me finished, he was put on a large 6 cylinder diesel and I was put on a tecumseh and now a briggs!!!!!! Go figure. And now with wal-mart bringing their mowers for warrenty work( 20 push mowers, 5 riding mowers, 8 go-garts) my fate is sealed. Anyway, we have a dial indicator and other precision tools, but no v-block. If the valve needs replacement, there is a very good chance that it will just be put in the corner and forgotten about just like all the other equipment that the state owns. That would mean I wasted four days on that pressure washer.

 
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11-25-03, 07:38 PM   #23  
A genius!!?? naaw...just been working on this stuff for a long time. The pitting on the valve stem was caused by rust at one time. The valve was rusted up in the valve guide until it pitted. A new valve is cheap...matter of fact, you could use a used one with good results if you lapped it in. I did this on a 5hp briggs like you're working on a month or two ago for a go-kart. Same problem...bent valve, same cause...someone banging on it because it was stuck.

Hey mower...have you noticed that we have 277 views on this thread? Must be an interesting topic!


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Last edited by cheese; 11-25-03 at 08:16 PM.
 
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11-29-03, 04:57 PM   #24  
All my formal training was on diesel engines larger than a house. I believe that working on small single cylinder may, at times, be more difficult because EVERYTHING must be working exactly right for the engine to develop it's rated HP. If a single cylinder of a 16 cylinder engine isn't quite up to par the reduction of HP may be less than 5 percent. Working on small engines is valuable training and if you can get them to develop full power you can get just about any other engine to do the same. I've seen exhaust valves that weigh over 1000 lbs and crank shafts 50ft long costing a half million bucks, but they work no differently than those in a B & S 5hp engine. I think you will do better in the long run with your experience in small engines.

 
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11-29-03, 11:46 PM   #25  
WOW!!!!!!!! I wish I could see those engines!!!!!!!!!!! I have seen pistons big enough to be bar stools and a couple of 1500 hp v-16 caterpillars, brand new $600,000 v-12 wakashaw natural gas engines, and numorus other diesels. Can you give me some advice on where to really get good training on specifically large diesel and natural gas engines. Around my neck of the woods, the only place to work on large engines is in the oilfield, on pogy fishing boats, and in the salt mines. I know the company will USUALLY send an employee to the manufacturers training schools. Any tips you can give me that you have learned from working on the job? I will start working in about 6 months.

As far as the briggs goes, I will be working on it monday, so I will see how things go.

 
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12-01-03, 01:53 PM   #26  
If you can afford the time & money look into going to a maritime academy. You will good diesel training and even graduate with a BS in engineering. Ships have the biggest diesel engines around and the pay is much better than most shore side jobs. Be prepaired to learn much more than just diesel engines though. An engineer on a ship has to deal with a lot of different things and you can't always call for a repair man. The only disadvantage is that you have to be away from home for months at a time and you have to go to school for at least four years. Look into Texas A&M University at Galveston (www.tamug.edu). The marine engineering technology program has such training.

 
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12-01-03, 10:37 PM   #27  
Well, the good news is that there was an identical briggs engine lying around the shop and so after swapping the shroud (recoil was messed up) and swapping the coil, I now have an engine that runs for a wopping 2 seconds!!!!!!!!!! So tomorrow I will clean the carburetor. But now I am faced with two problems. First, the old pressure washer engine has a cat water pump bolted to it, so I removed the four bolts holding it to the engine and now I can't get the pump off. It is frozen to the shaft. Besides soaking it down in penetrating oil, what else can I do to get it off? I was pulling pretty hard on it and it is stuck pretty well. The other problem is, the crankshaft on the new engine has a gear on it (this engine has what lookes like some kind of gearcase with a reduction, small gear on the crank, big gear on the output shaft), so now I will have to swap crankshafts. What is involved in this? I never went into the internals of a briggs. And to make things worse, a student that has been there 6 months less than I have and doesn't do half the work went on a job interview.This is a 24 month coarse and he finished in 11 months? Yeah right. So maybe, just maybe this pressure washer will work in a day ot two ??????? I don't mean to complain, just been a ruff day!!!!!

P.S. Thanks for the info Jughead!!!!!!!!!


Last edited by mower17; 12-01-03 at 11:10 PM.
 
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12-02-03, 12:01 AM   #28  
So you got another engine to start, and are trying to remove the engine with the valve problem and install this one...right?

The engine that is stuck in the pump could be a problem. You can keep working with it, but I have had to bust pumps away from engine crankshafts to get them off. (had to bust the housing and cut the pieces off of the engine shaft). Why not take the valve out of the newfound engine and install it in the engine that's already there?

The crankshaft is not hard to change, but it might not interchange. If the engines are identical, then they would, but you will need to know if it has plain bearings or ball bearings. That's assuming the crankshaft doesn't get ruined while trying to get the pump off...which it could. You will also have to change the sump covers.


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12-02-03, 12:45 AM   #29  
I was origionaly going to just swap the valves but the teacher didn't want, he's my toughest customer!!!!!!! I sure hope I can get that pump off without damaging anything. This is an awful lot of work for an old pressure washer. It better run right!!!!!!!

 
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12-02-03, 07:07 AM   #30  
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No offense but your teacher is running you in circles, I don't understand why after all the work you put into troubleshooting the valve problem he now wants you to go to another engine and compund the problems.
I suggest you stay with the original engine and reface the vale and lap in to get a good seat, check the cam timing, and get it to run.
As my Dad told me ( he was a master mechanic on construction equipment) if it has spark,compression, and fuel it will run!
By the way I make no claim that I'm a master mechanic.
I do how ever work on Briggs and Kohler engines a lot.
Good luck!

 
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12-02-03, 07:28 PM   #31  
Now you are never going to believe this, 5 minutes after I got the good engine to run perfectly and idle just right (I had to clean the carburetor), the teacher told me that he changed his mind and wants to keep the engine. So I had to put that gearcase back on and now all that is left on that engine is to fix the kill so that it contacts the ground when the idle lever is moved all the way to kill. As much as I am agrivated by the sight of that pressure washer (between those two engines, I removed the carburetor, muffler, and gas tank 8 times ) I don't want to give up or get mad. I know the teacher is trying his best but I promised myself a month back that I wouldn't let him get to me no matter what he did . So tomorrow I will check the flywheel key and watch the valves some more. On the good engine, when I would pour gas into the intake and try starting it, it would shoot gas out the intake just like the bad one except the good one wouldn't blow it out quite as hard and of coarse it would start, so aparently it is supposed to do that??????? The teacher said that the compression release is on the intake valve (I thought comression release was on exhaust valves???) and that is why it is held slightly up for nearly the entire compression stroke. Is it supposed to do that? The teacher also showed me two small threaded holes on each side of the water pump that is made to take two 5/16" coarse thread bolts. When they are threaded in all the way, they push on the adapter plate that is bolted to the engine and theoretically pushes the pump off. However, that pump housing is aluminium and bends quite easily, so I guess I won't touch the pump. The teacher said he might just put an electric motor on that pump, but I will fight that briggs to the death. Also, on that good briggs, the governor linkage keeps moving back and forth while it is running no matter how I adjust the needle valve screw. I also can't really tell a difference in the sound when I am adjusting it. What do you think? The teacher had told me that the reason that he hasn't sent me on a job interview is because I lack self confidence in my work therefore if I give up on that engine, he would keep me there longer. Thank god for this forum!!!!!!!!

P.S. Cheese, that was some good info about winterizing a mower, aspecially about lifting the tires off the ground to keep them from dry rot. I learned a lot!!!!!!


Last edited by mower17; 12-02-03 at 09:37 PM.
 
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12-02-03, 10:29 PM   #32  
Good grief!

Sounds like your teacher isn't helping your confidence at all. He's turning you every which way but loose.

Anyway...the surging governor is actually a carb problem. It is still running too lean. That's why the adjustments aren't making any differences. There is a welch plug on the side of the carb. You can remove it to clean out the idle passages, and install a new one. Also replace the pump diaphragm and the carb-to-tank gasket.

There is no real compression release on these engines. They are called "easy spin". The intake valve doesn't fully close until the piston nears TDC. Does it shoot gas out if you put it in the plug hole?

The holes for removing the pump may help, but don't rely solely on them because like you said, they might break right off. Use them to aid in removal.

Glad you were able to make use of the winterization post!


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12-03-03, 08:08 PM   #33  
Today I spent three hours to get it to kill and now it does kill like it should. But I am really lost now. At one position of the throttle (just under wide open throttle) it surges back and forth. It doesn't do this at any other throttle position. It was surging bad until I put the air filter back on, then it smoothed out. But how do I get it to stop surging at that one throttle position? I bent the tab that the governor spring hooks to and it did help some, but not enough. Do I need to tighten some more on the spring? I know most engine governor springs are very sensitive, but this one I tighted a lot and there was little change. I am familiar with large diesel engines surging while not under load but is this briggs doing the same? The teacher told me to act like he is a customer and get it running as if I was getting paid to do the job, I guess he forgot this is his engine . So is there any fix for this?????? I had wasted three hours on trying to make it stop surging. I didn't even have time to mess with the bad engine but I did notice that the magnet passes the coil after top dead center. Do you think this was keeping it from starting? I will get to work on it tomorrow, however, we are in the class all day on fridays and I only have next week to finish it before we are off for a month for christmas so any more advice that you could pass my way would be very much appreciated!!!!!!!!!! Thanks!!!!

 
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12-04-03, 01:34 AM   #34  
The engine is surging because it is running too lean at that particular point in position of the throttle. If you look in the throat of the carb at the edges of the throttle butterfly, there are some very small holes in the side. These holes are positioned in different places to allow fuel to enter through them according to how far open the throttle valve is. If, say...the second hole...was stopped up, it would run at idle, since that is the first hole, but as you opened the throttle, it would uncover the second hole. If the second hole was stopped up, the engine would be getting more air since you opened the throttle, but the second hole is not allowing fuel in, so it is still getting the fuel it was getting at idle. That means it is running lean. When an engine is running lean and surging, it is because it goes from having too much air and not enough fuel, so the rpms die down until there is enough fuel for it to run, but since it is getting all that air, it accelerates. It can only accelerate so much until it is getting too much air again, and not enough fuel, so it dies back down again, etc... (surges). The welch plug I mentioned allows access to these small holes and makes them available for cleaning.


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12-04-03, 01:40 AM   #35  
Would the welsh plug get ruined in the process of removal??????

 
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12-04-03, 01:43 AM   #36  
Yep. It is a small metal disk on the side opposite of the air-fuel adjustment screw. A new plug is less than a dollar.


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12-04-03, 09:46 PM   #37  
First thing I did this morning was start the engine and once again it was surging, but this time the teacher told me it is in the linkage for sure, so I held the throttle valve so it couldn't move back and forth and it ran at a steady speed. If it was running lean wouldn't it want to kill????? I know for sure I have all the linkages hooked up correctly. I also spent the entire day putting the bad engine together and as I expected, it wouldn't start. I did check the flywheel key and it was flawless. The magnet passes the coil just before top dead center, should it be like this? Also, I know the engine has spark, is getting air, I poured gas into the spark plug hole and I didn't even get a sputter, so it has to be compression right? With the intake valve staying open like you said, how could I check compression? We do have a compression gauge, but with the air coming out the intake like it should, it really throws me off cause on most engines, if it does that then there is a problem. When I took the spark plug off after trying to start it, there was a little smoke coming out the plug hole so something is happening in that engine. I am running out of ideas about that bad engine.

P.S. Thanks for taking the time every day to answer basically the same question and having the patients to help me out. I really appreciate it!!!!!!!!!

 
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12-05-03, 12:56 AM   #38  
Try this...find the spot where the engine likes to surge, then when it does it, spply the choke just a little. I bet it will stop surging. If so, you know it's fuel related.

Sounds like the magnet is in the correct position...it should have just passed the coil when the engine hits TDC.

I don't use a compression gague on these engines...I just feel how it turns. You can pull the rope and feel the compression of the engine. If you feel a decent resistance when the engine hits the compression stroke on a sharp pull of the cord, it should be enough to crank up.

One other thing...if you feel that you have sufficient compression, try another coil. It is rare, but I have seen coils actually fire well visually, but it happens at the wrong time. Usually a coil just stops firing when they fail, but once in a while you'll run across this.

On a problem like you're having here, sometimes it pays to back up and clear the slate and take a fresh look. This is a simple engine, and there are only so many things that could be causing the problem. If you're like me, you might get so caught up in one aspect of the problem that you overlook the obvious. (can't see the forest for the trees). When I get stumped, I usually have to go back to square one and restart the basic diagnostic procedure without getting drawn off on a tangent.


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12-06-03, 05:06 PM   #39  
Cheese, I don't mean to beat a dead horse, but I forgot to mention, when I apply the choke, it stops surging for about three seconds then it starts surging again. Either that engine will run next week or it will be the first briggs to fly!!!!!!

 
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12-06-03, 11:57 PM   #40  
Still don't think it is a linkage problem...but it is possible. I can't hear or see it, and I don't want to get you chasing after a carb problem just to find out it was actually a linkage problem, but I really don't think it is. Lean run is almost always the cause of surging. If the linkage was causing it, why would the choke affect it?


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