stubborn chainsaw won't start

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  #1  
Old 11-29-03, 03:44 PM
HankHrs
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stubborn chainsaw won't start

I have a Poulen wild thing chain saw that
is used infrequently. Went to start it and the fun began. nothing. so following the little i know. i checked that i have a spark. and went to see if fuel was getting through. yes - to the spark. but still doubting the fuel. ... how wet will cylinder chamber be after priming? I see fuel move through tubing but see nothing down carb throat ...(would i?) ... then being more adventurous then knowledgeable, I unscrewed everything i could on the carb to shoot it with carb cleaner. i have developed a crusher grip yanking on it but still no start. are there "beginning" settings to start from on the needle valves, other than the one and a quarter turn open that works on mowers etc? something i overlooked? a good how-to book? the consumer booklet is useless ... thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 11-29-03, 04:00 PM
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If fuel is getting to the cylinder, than the spark plug will be wet. Is the air filter clean? Is the gas fresh? If I remember from Cheese, you bottom out the mixture screw then back in out about one turn. If you have two mixture screws, then you fine tune the idle screw while the engine is at idle, then you run the engine wide open and fine tune the high speed screw until the engine is running at the fastest speed, then coninue to screw it in until the engine starts to sputter. Cheese will be able to straighten out any confusion that I might have given you. Probably your problem is old gas. It is good practice the run the tank dry before storing away. You might also have trash stuck in the carb jets. Good luck with the saw!!!!!! I know they can be a really big pain.
 

Last edited by mower17; 11-30-03 at 12:15 AM.
  #3  
Old 11-29-03, 11:39 PM
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Hello HankHrs!

You should not see fuel shoot into the carb throat while priming. The primer doesn't work that way on most two stroke carbs. If you see fuel going into the carb on one line, and out of the carb into the tank on the other line, then the primer is working correctly. Are you holding the throttle wide open while trying to start it? Is the choke closing?

Mower17 is right about the way to set the carb screws.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 10:39 AM
HankHrs
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good.questions. i've wondered if the manual's directions were incorrect. it said to go full choke to prime then open it to start?? I would have expected to keep the choke closed on a cold start.
i have also wondered if the trigger/throttle lock is not functioning correctly as its not holding the trigger full back. i actually have to 1/2 release it to get the lock to hold. ... i will be trying again with the trigger held open ; and experimenting with choke position.
... and yup, changed the gas.
thanks for the confirmation on the carb screws. i'm probably in good position for a start. .... or uh, more attempts... i'll keep u posted.
 
  #5  
Old 11-30-03, 09:45 PM
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Try holding the trigger all the way at full throttle while cranking with the choke fully closed until it starts, or sounds like it tried to start, then open the choke all the way and try again. If it runs, but starts to die out, then close the choke partially to keep it running until it warms up and you can adjust the screws.
 
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Old 12-01-03, 04:42 AM
HankHrs
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Thanks for explaining the choke-throttle procedure. in 2 sentences you were clearer than the booklet. ....
before your last post, i began wondering if the spark was hot enough even with the new plug. i mean i can see a spark if i check, and the cylinder gets wet....
so, i cleaned the magnet and coil casing (i am sure there's better names) ... and i actually got a burp!!!!
do you know what the gap on the plug should be? .... now together with what you just sent me We have *got* to be getting close. don't we ?
 
  #7  
Old 12-01-03, 10:54 AM
dorkpunch
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General spark plug gap is 30 thousandths, but check your book to make sure. If your plug is dripping fuel when you pull it out, then the engines flooded and the best thing to do is let it "air out". Pull it over a few times with the plug out, no choke, no throttle killswitch OFF (spark and fuel shooting out of the cylinder is a bad thing..... ) . Dry the plug as best you can (a small torch or a lighter works pretty good, but be carefull, eh? ) and start over. good luck,eh?
 
  #8  
Old 12-02-03, 12:10 AM
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I agree...if the plug is wet, it is flooding. Either the choke is staying on too long, or the carb is just letting too much fuel in for whatever reason. When the plug gets wet, you usually can open the choke fully, hold the throttle wide open, and pull until it starts. If it has a carb problem other than the choke that is causing it to flood, it may never dry out enough to start until the problem is corrected.
 
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Old 12-02-03, 07:46 AM
HankHrs
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thank u dorkpunch and cheese for hanging in there. dorkpunch: i usually use the air dry method. i'll leave the flash method for the more experienced cheese: i'm glad this isn't pressing for me . i don't heat w/ wood and there's no tree on the garage roof .... but i'm thinking this stinker has something out of the ordinary out of whack with it. i think i'm down to ensuring the fuel tubing is good ... as far as things i can test . it reminds me more of a mower that once had a broken key as a cause. ya could play w/ fuel -spark all ya wanted and nothing happened. i just hate to let the thing go because its 3 yrs old and visually mint. that something like a spring or membrane in the carb is shot would make sense . i know fuel is going through it . is there a flow test? visual ? and there may be a pt of "enough" already??
 
  #10  
Old 12-02-03, 07:53 AM
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Quite possibly, from sitting, the old fuel has gummed up the carb, not allowing the needle to function properly. On setting that high speed jet, start at one turn out...hold it at WOT and screw it in slowly...it will start to sound like its going to self destruct...turn it back out until it starts to "four stroke" or flutter slightly.....it is very possible that you will not be able to do this because of EPA restricted carbs....you may only have a quarter turn worth of settings...that is the downfall of new restricted carbs...
 
  #11  
Old 12-02-03, 10:41 PM
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It could well be a fuel line broken or bad diaphragm or gum in the carb. Usually the signs of these problems is not enough fuel getting to the engine. Too much fuel is what you seem to be saying. It is possible that a carb problem would allow too much fuel, but fuel lines usually don't cause that. Try pulling the muffler off and make sure it is not clogged up. Restricted exhaust is common on 2strokes, and will cause the problem you have.
 
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