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recoil starter??


doitnewf's Avatar
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12-22-03, 06:13 AM   #1  
doitnewf
recoil starter??

I have an old Mastercraft snow blower that i got from a friend.
Looks kinda old maybe 20 + yrs.
It has a briggs engine.
The starter rope broke and I'm stuck as how to take of the recoil to replace the rope.
Does anyone have any experience with this type of blower or is there any sites I might check for "vintage blowers"?
Any suggestions greatly appreciated
Thx,
John

 
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12-22-03, 06:39 AM   #2  
jlm
Usually you can remove the starter shroud with four bolts, two at the top and two at the sides. After this wind the spring in the correct direction and clamp in place so you can remove the old rope. Install a new rope and allow it to pull into the starter and adjust the end so the pull handle goes up to the shroud tight. If your rewind spring is broken it's going to get a little tricky to replace that. Good luck.

 
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12-22-03, 12:01 PM   #3  
doitnewf
recoil

Thanks JLM
It looks like the shroud is held in place on top by the head bolts??
I dont want to distrub if I dont have to.
Any ideas?
Thx
Jp

 
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12-22-03, 11:10 PM   #4  
Gill Is The Man
Hey dude, Ive encountered many engines as you describe, with 3 headbolts holding on the side cover shroud. You should be fine to take them off, but like you said, the engine is 20 years old, and they'll probably be rusty. If you can get them off, its fine to remove just those 3 and no others, and proceed to take off the rest of the side cover. If the engine does have rusty bolts, and you're still afraid to take them off, this recoil may be a 2 piece, and if so you can drill out the rivets to get to the recoil. I reccomend the first method, tho, and as long as you tighten the bolts back down before starting it, it should be fine. As mentioned above, just rewind the spring and line up the inner hole with the outer one, after its fairly tight, but not so far as you cant turn it anymore. When its all lined up, stick a putty knife in between the flange and the plastic spindle, and get about 6 ft of starter rope to put back in. Depending on the size of the engine, the rope will vary, but any parts store will steer you in the right direction. Tie a knot in one end of the rope, then take the other end and melt it with a lighter, then wipe it down with a rag. this should make it more like a point, easier to aim, and now it wont unbind. after you thread the 2 holes, tie it into the pull starter handle, pull out the putty knife and you're done. To be extra careful, you can spray both knots with a little paint to make sure they dont come loose. Good luck, any more questions email me.

 
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12-22-03, 11:56 PM   #5  
Hello John!

Good advice from these guys. Let us know how it goes!


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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12-23-03, 05:20 AM   #6  
doitnewf
recoil

Many Thanks !!
I'll get at it after the holidays
I'll let ya know how I make out.
Thanks again and Merry Christmas to all !!
Cheers
JP

 
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12-27-03, 02:24 PM   #7  
doitnewf
I'm not totally familiar with all the briggs models out there but if it is like some of the ones I've done before, the bolts in question on the top of the starter housing should be 1/4-20 style bolts and will not have any affect on the cylinder head torque that you are worried about. The cylinder head bolts are 5/16-18 and are noticibly different from the above mentioned ones.
The starter I believe is riveted on and I would rather remove the starter housing and do the rope replacement. It's quite simple and you don't have to remove the recoil pulley or spring. But since you've probably never done it before it may be a little intimidating so I would recommend going to your local small motor dealer and pick up an actual Briggs Technicians repair manual. Their books describe most of the work you'll ever have to do on that motor in very good detail and in laymans terms (that's helped me many times) and it's money well spent.

Hope this helps

snoman

 
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