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kohler k582 stator output


steve haney's Avatar
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01-04-04, 11:10 AM   #1  
steve haney
kohler k582 stator output

problem was no output from stator (28 vac) removed flywheel found the permanent magnets where clinging to stator not flywheel per local small engine shop reattached to flywheel with jb weld now I have 10-12 vac at 3600 rpm per tech manual should have 28 vac. Is this an indication of bad/weak stator or didn't I get the magnets in accurately enough?

 
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01-04-04, 12:17 PM   #2  
From what I hear, once the magnets come loose, the flywheel needs to be replaced due to a safety hazzard caused from the possibility of the magnets coming loose while the engine is running.

 
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01-04-04, 10:33 PM   #3  
Hello Steve!

I agree that it is considered proper to replace the flywheel, but I also know that using JBweld is common practice to re-install them. I would think that your stator is probably bad, possibly from the magnets scraping it. Were you able to see exactly where each magnet was originally glued to the flywheel? The magnets themselves could be damaged as well. Did you check to see if the magnets could fit in revers polarity? Maybe some got glued in wrong?


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01-05-04, 12:05 PM   #4  
steve haney
additional info

first, thanks for the input its all helpful.
The magnets are in the correct polarity as they were all marked on one side with a red dot, per my local small engine shop he said "make the dots face you" next, I took great care and glued them as close as possible to original based on where there were previous faint marks of the original locations also used shims to be sure to get the gaps between the magnets equal. As for the stator it has continuity on an ohm meter and is not shorted to ground but the surface does show some signs of wear I just didn't know if they would fail in this fashion i.e. low output.

 
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01-05-04, 03:55 PM   #5  
I would be suspicious of your voltmeter reading. There are reasons why your voltmeter may be giving you wrong readings if you are trying to measure the AC output of the charging circuit directly. Can you verify if your battery is being charged? Measure the battery voltage before & after starting the engine. If you have more than about 13.7 volts DC directly across the battery, with the engine running, your charging circuit is probably working OK. With the engine off, voltage measurements across the battery will probably drift down towards 12.5 volts with a good strong battery, droping to about 10 volts when you engage the starter. There are some clamp type ammeters on the market that will work with DC. Mine will easily measure the charging current going into the battery and would be a better indicator of the health of the charging circuit than the direct measurement of the AC voltage coming out of the alternator. If you can verify that the battery isn't being charged by the running engine either by a direct current measurement or by a voltage check directly across the battery, further work and/or replacement of the flywheel will most likely be necessary. I've priced some flywheels lately and you can afford to spend some time checking the DC system voltages before pulling the trigger on a new flywheel.


Last edited by jughead; 01-05-04 at 04:06 PM.
 
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01-06-04, 12:52 AM   #6  
Good advice...flywheels are pricey.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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