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Mike 111's Avatar
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01-25-04, 07:17 AM   #1  
Mike 111
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Hi Everyone, just came across this site and registered. Looks like a very helpful site. Anyways I have a very minor problem I recently completly restored a old John Deere 111 from a complete engine rebuild to a paint job and it looks brand new. When I was painting the beast some over spray got on my masking tape markings that told me where the hoses go to and from the auto pulse. I think I tried every combination, but if anybody has a diagram for the hoses that would be great. It is the rectangular shape autopulse that mounts to the flywheel shroud. I purchased a rebuild kit for it hoping it would show a diagram but no luck.

Thankx

Mike

 
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01-25-04, 01:29 PM   #2  
In order for us to help you in the fashion you suggested, you must supply us with your model and serail numbers. Thankyou

 
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01-25-04, 11:25 PM   #3  
Hello Mike!

What engine do you have? Are you referring to a fuel pump (crankcase pressure-pulse operated)?


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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01-26-04, 02:40 PM   #4  
Mike 111
Sorry guys, the enging is a 11 HP B&S 2500 series, Syncro Balanced with a vertacle shaft. and yes I guess the "autopulse" is the fuel pump or crankcase pressure-pulse. I thought this autopulse relied on a vaccum from the crankcase not pressure. Well I've been wrong many times before. Learn something new everyday.

Mike

 
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01-27-04, 12:14 AM   #5  
Sounds like you are talking about the fuel pump, which uses pressure fluctuations in the crankcase caused by the movement of the piston back and forth in the cylinder. The pressure increases as the piston moves downward in the cylinder, which moves the diaphragm in the pump one way, and when the piston goes back toward TDC, the pressure decreases and moves the diaphragm the other way. There is not really a vacuum in the crankcase. The line/outlet on the pump that is closest to the carb should be the fuel outlet or pressure line. The line/inlet on the pump should be the one farthest from the carb, or pointing away from the carb, and it should connect to the tank line. The line/outlet between the two should connect to the crankcase.

This is the general way they connect, but there are variations, and it could be mounted differently depending on the application. The middle one is always the one that connects to the crankcase, but depending on how this was mounted, it could be the opposite as far as the inlet and outlet goes.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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