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craftsman trimmer


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01-31-04, 06:21 PM   #1  
gotcha640
craftsman trimmer

i picked up a craftsman trimmer engine a few months ago, spent a while cleaning it up (it ran, but i didnt have a use for it right away, so i took it apart and shined it up a bit) and when i put it back together, it wouldnt start. So i had some free time this afternoon, tore it apart again, and it turns out the key in the flywheel was broken clean off. i know the flywheel is phelon #25870, and i'm looking for a new/used one. no one knows what engine i have though. on the crankcase/frame, it says 037318, but that doesnt match at any of the places i've looked (google, ebay). i was thinking about just grinding out a keyway so i could use a home made key to hold the 'wheel on, or even just weld it on there, but i'd rather find a new one. any suggestions would be great. thanks

 
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01-31-04, 06:49 PM   #2  
I did some checking but couldn't match up the numbers you gave. What you really need is the Sears model number of the machine the engine is out of. If you had that it might be possible to find a reference for the part you need. I don't know about the Sears 2 cycle engines, but on a Briggs & Statton engine the key is made of something soft like aluminum. They tell you in the manual not to substitute a steel key or you could cause damage to the engine. My local hardware store has keys for sale in a package of 5.

I'll bet you made the same mistake I made a while back. When you put the flywheel back onto the crankshaft DON'T lubricate the crankshaft or the flywheel before putting them back together. I did that on a 5HP Briggs & Startton engine and I kept shearing the crank keys off EVERYTIME the engine backfired even once. Usually it would go when I shut the engine off or when I first started it. It drove me crazy for quite a while until read in the manual NOT to lubricate that connection. I thought I was doing myself a favor by making it easier to remove the flywheel from the crankshaft in the future. Lubricating the crankshaft/flywheel junction puts too much stain on the key during a backfire and it will shear everytime. I think that's the reason the key is made of soft material anyway is to act as a mechanical 'circuit breaker' in the event that the crank receives a large shock load. You need the friction of a non-lubricated joint to keep from shearing the keys.

 
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01-31-04, 06:55 PM   #3  
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well, this was the first small engine i'd ever had any experience with, and i didnt know anything at all. like i said, i didnt have any use for it right away, so my idea was "hey thats dirty, lets take it apart and clean it up." i do remember i had to beat on the flywheel to get it off, and i may have broken the built in key then, or when i was putting it back together and didnt realize there was a key, or when i took it back and forth to work a few times....at any rate, would you recommend getting a new flywheel, so i could be sure the key is in the right place (like i say, it was a built in key, so i'll have to use my dremel to cut a notch, and dremel and file to cut a key.) i have some aluminum i can use for the key. thanks for the fast reply.

 
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01-31-04, 11:53 PM   #4  
when I get home I'll try to remember to look at an engine I have myself. It just happens to be a Sears weed wacker engine, but I don't recall the deal with the flywheel. I had it apart on the work bench, but was working on the carb. It's best to use a puller to remove a flywheel because you can bend or break them by using a hammer.

 
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02-01-04, 02:28 AM   #5  
Hello Gotcha640!

I would reccomend getting a new flywheel to avoid problems, damage, and/or injury. You can probably find a used one at a small engine shop. I don't know what model trimmer you have, but I bet if it uses Phelon parts, it's probably a Poulan. Poulan products are found with the craftsman, weedeater, and other names on them.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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02-01-04, 10:27 AM   #6  
gotcha640
can you give me any idea as to how much a new flywheel costs? i havent been able to find the one i need at any of the places i've looked (ebay, google, jacks small engines) and the nearest small engine shop i know of is half an hour away. thanks for all your help.

 
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02-01-04, 01:27 PM   #7  
I checked my key and it appears to be made out of steel. You can check yours to be sure with a magnet.

 
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02-01-04, 10:11 PM   #8  
You ought to be able to pick up a used one for $5 to $10. No idea what a new one would cost. Probably not more than $30.00.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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