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Ariens Sno-Thro


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02-02-04, 01:01 PM   #1  
mozez
Ariens Sno-Thro

I have an old Ariens Sno-Throw, probably late 60's early 70's. Lately I've only been able to get it to move in 2nd gear and intermittently in reverse. Can anyone give me any ideas on how the transmissions on these things work and what the most likely culprit would be?
Mozez

 
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02-02-04, 02:26 PM   #2  
Snowman will respond to your posting soon!

 
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02-02-04, 06:36 PM   #3  
mozez
I'm not the snowman that terminator refered to but I'll give it a shot. First off I'm not sure what horsepower you have but if it is a 6 or under then it probably has the friction wheel drive system.
If so, it utilizes a rubber coated friction drive wheel that is driven off a steel disc, and it could use some adjusting. If you remove the bottom pan under the blower where the drive system is located you will see the unit I'm talking about. Take a look at the rod that controls the shifting mechanism. As you move it back and forth the wheel should also move back and forth...hence the different ratio and direction. On that rod there will be an adjusting nut/bolt. Either loosen or tightent to shorten/lengthen the rod and you may see some response. Do this without the machine running.
One other thing is you may have some oil or grease on the rubber drive wheel or the metal disc that it rides on, wipe that off clean.
Worse case scenario is that the rubber wheel is so badly chewed that you will have to replace it.

Let me know.

snoman (the other guy)

 
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02-03-04, 02:59 PM   #4  
re: drive problem

Hello Mozez:

I concur with the mighty man from Winnipeg (AKA Snoman.)

If it's a machine under 6 HP or so the clutch/drive mechanism is exactly as he described.

If you could repost with the model number and serial number of your blower it will help us give you more accurate advice.

That said, it's rare that the rubber wheel he decribes is bad.

Most likely it really IS a simple clutch adjustment.

As Snoman suggested, remove the bottom pan (4 bolts) and move the gear drive lever (while machine is off) so you can see how it works.

The rest is easy. Look at the clutch rod on the left handlebar of your machine when in operating position--ie., standing as if you were snowblowing. Follow it down and at the bottom there wil be an adjustment nut. Loosen that and move the rod down towards the ground, then re-tighten the nut.

99% of the time this will solve the issue.

Ohhhh..hope I explained that OK, Snoman.

BTW, they lifted the state of emergency for snow this morning and now we're getting lake effect again but it's only supposed to be 12" or so tonight.

Cheerio,

Snowman53

 
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02-03-04, 07:04 PM   #5  
snowman53
We have lots in common...we both love to play in the snow and both like ariens blowers. I just sold my 6 hp and bought another one so I could have something to tinker with.
Oh and yes you explained it perfectly....I couldn't have done it better.

regards
snoman

 
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02-04-04, 06:24 AM   #6  
mozez
I took a look and it is a friction wheel as you said and looks pretty straight forward. I will play with it tonight and let you know the results. The rubber part looks fine. There may be some grease on the wheel. The only concern I have is that, on first glance, it looks like the adjustment on the shaft is already fully extended. I'll play with it tonight and let you know. I'll also grab the model # and serial #, but I'm already confident that you are talking about the right model. It is an Ariens. It has a Briggs & Stratton. I think it is a 5 or 6hp. It is one of the ones that allows you to put various attachments on the front. I only use it as a snow blower.

Mozez

 
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02-04-04, 07:03 PM   #7  
Hello mozez!

Sounds like the snowmen have you covered! You'll get that machine fixed for sure with them on your side! I'm not much help when it comes to snowblowers unless it's an engine problem. Thanks for helping guys!


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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02-05-04, 05:56 AM   #8  
mozez
Model# H60-75003E
Ser# 52931048B (last letter could be an 8?)
Last night I did as you said. I didn't have a lot of time to work on it. I slid the rod from the clutch down. The rubber must be slipping on the wheel in the lower gear. It seems to work fine in 2nd, 3rd and 4th but it hesitates and jerks in reverse and 1st. How should I go about adjusting the rod the comes from the shift lever. Should I put it in neutral and tighten or loosen the rod until that rubber wheel rides in the center of the other steel disc? The rubber seems a bit hard. Would it be a good idea to replace it? Otherwise I think I'm well on my way to getting this thing fixed. Or is there a spring or something that forces the wheel with the rubber on to the other disc. Are parts even available for this thing? Thanks for all your help.
Mozez

 
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02-05-04, 01:10 PM   #9  
jlm
Parts should be available from any Ariens dealer or over the internet. There is a spring which puts tension to the friction wheel when you let the drive lever go. The disc under the machine is usually Aluminum not steel and needs to be free of oil or grease. The shaft that the drive disc moves on needs grease so it will shift easily form rev. to 5th gear without binding; this shaft is usually a hex shape thru the disc and a second shaft farther above which is round, maybe 1/2" in dia.
Hope this helps!

 
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02-06-04, 07:45 AM   #10  
mozez
Thanks everyone. A little cleaning of the disk (yes, it is aluminum), a little grease and everything seems to be working fine now. Thanks for all the help. This is a great resource.
Mozez

 
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02-06-04, 12:11 PM   #11  
re: McCullough Chainsaws

Hello All:

I have several chainsaws but the smallest is a McCullough "Mac 3816"

I was using it today to cut icicles on a roof and ice dam problem for a neighbor and the plastic choke lever broke.

I called my parts supplier (where two hours earlier I had spent yet ANOTHER $20 for carb parts and he told me "if it's a McCullough, throw it away."

I've never heard the full story on what happened to McCullough but apparently they were sold several times and then all repair parts were bought up by salvage outfits and 'may" be available on the net.

Weird part is that McCullough equipment is being sold still in my area, but only as reconditioned and with a 90 day warranty.

Looks to me as once again someone bought a name.

Anyway, this has been a great little saw; it's light, has always started on the first pull even in low temps and is easy to handle when up on a ladder cutting icicles--which can get HUGE here if one has not raked their roof and have insulation and venting problems.

It can't come close to my Husqvarna when wood is involved but has been a perfect saw for what I've needed it to do.

Any info on McCullough or a link to the part would be appreciated. I can fabricate a new choke lever if need be but would rather not.

TIA,

Snowman53

 
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02-06-04, 12:29 PM   #12  
re: Ariens, and an apology

Hello Mozez:

Glad to hear you got it going. Traction drive issues are usually simpler than auger or impeller issues--which nearly always involve replacing bushings and bearings.

That said, here's a tip on model numbers etc:

The model and serial number you listed are for the engine, but you'll need more if you ever have to buy parts and want it to be a painless procedure.

Get down and look at the back of the machine on the lower left side, right near the bolt you took out to remove the bottom pan.

You should see a model number and serial number for the snowblower itself, not the engine.

There is also a separate model and serial number on the back of the auger/impeller housing, but you will never need that unless replacing parts on that unit.

You mentioned other attachments. I was surprised to see that documents referred to that on my machine and wondered what they were talking about. After all, it's a snowblower.

Turns out after searching through Parts Radar that they make a lawn edger attachment for my unit. I'll never need it and can see by design it would only be a few bolts to remove the auger housing and bolt on somthing else but it is not an idea I'll pursue.



Once armed with that you can go to Ariens and the Parts Radar section for exploded diagrams and a full listin of parts numbers.
Very hand and solves a lot of confusion when you got to buy a part.

Here's a direct link to the Sno Throw section:

http://partsradar.arinet.com/Scripts...r&Partner=ARNS

Ohhh..you mentioned you thought the machine was from the 60's or 70's. I'd know by looking at it but will reply in another post with the age, usually best determined by engine serial number.

Cheerio,

Snowman53

 
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02-06-04, 12:47 PM   #13  
re: age of your Ariens.

Hello Mozez:

I had a look but there is at least one poster here who knows more on this and could give you a more definitive answer. Forget his name but he pinned down the age of mine to the year.

I do know this: the "H" indicates it is a horizontal shaft engine. No suprise there, but if it was HS that would indicate a small frame engine under 6 HP

Next: H60-7500E THe 7500E will be your reference if searching for or buying parts and makes me think it's a 7 or 7.5HP engine

Also, it IS a "B" at the end. That indicates the shift and line is was manufactured on. So, your engine was manufactured on a second shift and line(3PM to 11 PM or so)

There is also a way to determine actual date and year but the info I have does not match up with your SN.

Good luck and let us know what you find out. Serial numbers fascinate me as they have been an invaluable resource on past projects restoring cars and tractors.

Good Luck and happy snowblowing

Snowman53

 
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02-06-04, 05:51 PM   #14  
mozez
Your serial number doesn't sound correct, normally it's a 4 digit number with a letter after it. As for the serial number though, the first number of the serial is the year that it was built. Unfortunately they don't tell you what decade it was made it so you have to look at the condition of the motor ane decide if it was maybe a 60's or 70's

snoman

 
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