"jerky" snowblower movement

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  #1  
Old 02-19-04, 05:48 PM
scanplannedit
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"jerky" snowblower movement

It is a yardmaster, and it is my second season of of use (8.5hp). I notice the problem when under heavy snow, or deep snow. The snowblower's wheels do not turn smoothly, but kind of "jerky". The rpm's of the engine do not seem to be affected (does not stall, or feel labored). Anyhow, besides the wheels turning awkardly, the blower has very little "torque" to the point of the wheels actually stopping. I tightened up the throttle cable (purchaser's explanation). This started on my second use where I tried to move some heavy slush/granular. Did I fry the transmission?, or is it the belts, or friction wheel? Thanks ahead of time.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-19-04, 11:16 PM
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Hello scanplannedit!

Watch the friction wheel when it acts up. See if it is turning when the unit stops moving. If not, then the transmission is ok. You might need to adjust tension on that friction disk/wheel.
 
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Old 02-25-04, 07:23 PM
scanplannedit
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thanks, I'll give it a try. How do I do that?
 
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Old 02-25-04, 09:48 PM
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Sorry to say, I know little about snowblowers. Here in South Georgia, the sight of a snowblower would probably draw a crowd.

I understand that many if not most are driven via a drive disk, and driven disk. The drive disk is usually a round metal spinning plate. The driven disk is a round metal plate sitting perpendicular to the surface of the drive disk, and it has a rubber rim around it that contacts the drive disk. It is held against the drive disk usually by spring tension. On the machinery I've seen driven with this type of system, there is often a series of holes used to adjust the spring tension. Other times, the drive disk is adjustable. Sometimes it is attatched with a set screw and it can be loosened and moved toward or away from the driven disk, to increase or decrease tension. If the rubber on the driven disk is chewed up or worn, it will also cause problems and requires replacement.

I am unsure if this is how your application is set up, but hopefully it will help. Someone with more snowblower expertise may answer with more accuracy.
 
  #5  
Old 02-26-04, 12:08 PM
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re: snowblower traction

Hello Scan:

Cheese did a fine job of explaining the drive mechanism.


That said--and considering how new the machine is--it sounds to me like it is most likely a belt tensioning issue. I really doubt it's an issue with the drive or transmission.

What you might do is remove the shroud covering the belt (or belts) and they should be easy to see. Start it up and see what happens when it's under load.

There should be an idler pulley for belt tension--and it is probably mounted to an idler arm (flat piece of steel) that is slotted on the end where the pulley is, thereby allowing adjustment.

I'm not familiar with the Yardmaster but will hunt around and see if I can find an exploded parts view that would help you.

Good luck and do please repost if you can't figure it out.

Kindest Regards,

Snowman53
 
  #6  
Old 03-04-04, 06:03 PM
scanplannedit
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thanks for the replies fellas.
 
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