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Which chainsaw brand/size to get?


Augustwest's Avatar
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NJ

02-26-04, 02:02 PM   #1  
Which chainsaw brand/size to get?

Thanks in advance for your responses and help.

We moved into a house last summer and now that the majority of the inside work is completed, I want to tackle the yard.

The back 3/5ths of the acre is severly overgrown, with many fallen trees and lots of viney brush. Also some leaning trees that should be dropped.

I want to get a new chainsaw as the old Homelite will not start and you can no longer get parts for it.

The majority of the trees are older growth with many close to a foot in diameter. Mostly maples. And we have some old pines lining the side yards that should be cut as wel.

What size saw(bar) would suit me best for the initially clearing of those fallen trees and then the future pruning of limbs, etc.

Also what brand should I look for? I'm thinking of staying away from HomeLite as the last one didn't work out so well. I think they sell Stihl and Echo brands locally. Any others I should look into.

Thank you again for you time.

August West

 
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cheese's Avatar
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02-26-04, 11:16 PM   #2  
Hello August West!

Both brands you mentioned are good saws. I am partial to Stihl myself. Hard to beat 'em and hard to kill 'em. Husqvarna also makes a good saw, if you go for the higher end saws. The cheaper ones are made by poulan. Most low-end department store saws are ok for the casual user, but in your case, it sounds like you need a real saw. I don't think I would reccomend a saw with a bar less than 16 inches, 18 would be better. For felling the trees, this should be ok. For limbing, you can buy a shorter bar and chain for the saw. I really don't like a real long bar when limbing trees. I like a small lightweight saw for limbing, and I use a stihl 009. I use a Husqvarna model 61 for the bigger stuff. Both are good saws.

Be careful. Watch out for those vines and overgrowth. That kind of stuff can cause the saw to kick back on you.

Another thought...Good maple trees are worth money to sawyers. Cetrain ones are worth big bucks...like birdseye maple and flame maple, etc... You might find someone willing to come in and take those trees out for you and you can avoid a bit of the hassle. Check the yellow pages for sawmills and lumbermills in your area. Give them a call. The pines may also be worth their efforts. Especially if they are longleaf yellow pines. You might make a few hunderd bucks in the deal too.

Hope this helps, and keep us posted!


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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02-27-04, 05:54 AM   #3  
slider
I'm with cheese--go with a good one like Stihl and an 18" bar.

 
Dave_D1945's Avatar
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02-27-04, 06:30 AM   #4  
I have a Stihl with a 16" bar that I use a couple of times a year to cut firewood. It's light, easy to handle, and always starts.

 
Augustwest's Avatar
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02-27-04, 07:08 AM   #5  
Thanks!

Thanks you for all of your responses!

Cheese. We're in NJ and I was completely unaware that anyone might be interested in these trees. I think the majority are japanese maples. I'll make a few calls and see if there's any interest with local tree cutters? or should I call a mill?

In the meantime I'll be looking for an 18" Stihl at the local big chains as per your posts.

I think i'll be using the hand loppers for most of the vines to avoid any unnecessary kickbacks.

Thanks again!

 
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02-27-04, 10:13 AM   #6  
The best saw for you to buy, is the one that has the best service available to you. In your case you are better off with Stihl it sounds like. Stihls are great saws, although I am a Jonsered/Husky man myself.

Go into your local dealer, and ask him some questions as well...see how knowledgable he is and if you are comfortable dealing with him...he could be your new best friend. The service alone can save you a bundle...and shy from the box stores...

Definitely check out to see if your wood has any value, no point in giving anything away!

Let us know how you make out!

 
cheese's Avatar
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02-28-04, 01:40 AM   #7  
If you don't want the hassle of cutting down the trees, call the tree cutters. They may do it for the wood. (worth checking into anyway). If you want to cut down the trees and sell them, call the mills. They'll let you know if they would be interested and also give you an idea of what length to cut the trunks, etc...


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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