Craftsman Blower

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  #1  
Old 03-02-04, 04:40 PM
Richard Bante
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Craftsman Blower

Hello!

New guy here. I have a Craftsman (a.k.a., Poulan, Weed Eater) Blower/Vac, 25cc,2-cycle,200MPH/400CFM, Model #358.797550. I haven't been able to start it lately. I previously had a problem with the engine bogging down on acceleration, but I fixed that. I have narrowed it down, I believe to the Ignition Module. I have changed the Spark Plug twice, just in case. My question is this. The Ignition Module has two oval shaped holes for attaching (I am assuming the holes are this shape for adjustment). Do I have to flush the module to the flywheel or offset it from the flywheel? The flywheel has a high spot on it. Do I set module at this point flush or offset? Thank you for any help.

Richard
 
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  #2  
Old 03-02-04, 07:52 PM
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Loosen the two bolts on the coil and place a buisness card in between it and the flywheel, hold it in place and rotate the flywheel until the magnet lines up with the coil and holds it to the flywheel with the buisness card in between the two. Now tighten both screws and remove the buisness card and it is set correctly. And yes, spark plugs can and will go bad all of a sudden without warning.
 
  #3  
Old 03-03-04, 12:55 AM
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Hello Richard!

Did you check spark? What is causing you to think it's the ignition? The reason I ask is because it sounds like you have a fuel-related problem rather than ignition. Usually if the coil goes bad, it won't start at all.
 
  #4  
Old 03-03-04, 07:56 AM
Richard Bante
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Craftsman Blower

Mower17, thank you for your advice. I will try that today.

Cheese, thank you also for your advice. The fuel problem I corrected with new carburetor, filter, etc. It was working. I believe it is a separate problem. The blower will not start at all, not even try to start. Thanks again.

Richard
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-04, 01:15 PM
Richard Bante
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Craftsman blower

Well, I changed the Ignition module and also the spark plug again and it still won't start. I have to point out that I am not a mechanic and for me to take "anything" apart and attempt to fix it is an accomplishment in itself. That said, I do not know how to check for spark, but since I changed both the plug and coil what else could it be electrically? I have changed the spark plug, muffler, carburetor, coil, fuel filter and I even changed the rings for the hell of it.

The original problem was the fact that it bogged down and started to die on acceleration. I cleaned the carburetor and with the muffler and air filter disconnected, started it up and it worked fine. I used it for about 10 minutes, shut it down and it hasn't started since.

When I press the primer bulb, I get fuel in the bulb. Question? When I press the primer bulb, should I be able to see fuel squirting into the carburetor? If I should see fuel squirting into the carburetor and down into the cylinder, (I have the carburetor disconnected from the cylinder while doing this) I do not see any fuel. When I press the bulb continuously I do see fuel and air in one of the lines. That's another question? There are two lines coming from the fuel tank. Should I see fuel in both of them.

This has become a battle between this machine and myself. I guess the worst case scenario would be for me to buy another blower of the same kind. Then I would have almost a complete set of spare parts. Thanks again for any help.

Richard
 
  #6  
Old 03-05-04, 03:37 PM
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If I remember right you can not test to see if fuel is going into the carb if you have the carb off the engine. If I remember right, there is a suction that gets created when pressing the primer bulb. Its very possible that you might have a vacume created in the fuel tank caused by blocked air hole in the fuel cap. If that is true, use a needle to get the gunk out until you can see light clearly threw the hole. Another thing to check is that the air fuel hoses are tightly seated on the connections. Check for cracks in the hoses as well. If there are any that could be the problem too. Cheese is our forum moderator and expert in these matters. However he is having internet trouble. I am trying to fill in for him while he gets it all fixed.
 
  #7  
Old 03-07-04, 02:19 PM
Richard Bante
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Da agony of da feet!

Well, I cleaned the fuel lines out and also the gas cap. Still no start. I also was too aggressive and broke the plug in the gas cap and stripped holes in two other parts. There was one other reason given in the manual for a no-start and that was low compression. When I was at Home Depot looking at the new Poulans, I pulled the starter cord several times and realized that my blower was much easier to pull. This may be normal I don't know. I have just about given up. It's not that I haven't tried, but I do not want to spend anymore money or time on this machine. I've got work to do, so I went and bought an Echo ES-210. I've had very good luck with Echo equipment and they are definitely built better.

I'd like to thank everyone again for their help...... Mower17, Cheese, Terminator20. It is very much appreciated.

Richard

P.S. Would anyone like to buy a 2 year-old non-working Craftsman Blower with extra parts? Maybe someone can use it for training purposes and/or a challenge.
 
  #8  
Old 03-08-04, 12:31 AM
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For future reference...to check for spark: Remove the spark plug, connect it to the plug wire, pull the rope while making sure the metal of the spark plug is touching metal on the engine. If it sparks, your ignition is working. If not, you have ignition problems. You could just have a bad shutoff switch.
 
  #9  
Old 03-08-04, 07:45 AM
Richard Bante
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Cheese, thanks for your tip on how to check for spark. Is there a way that I can check for compression on this machine? Thank you again.

Richard
 
  #10  
Old 03-09-04, 12:25 AM
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You can use a compression guage, with results that may or may not be accurate. One rule of thumb that is not necessarily fool-proof, is to hold the pull rope and let go of the blower. If it falls quickly, your compression is likely to be low. If it stays in place or drops slowly, then the compression should be fine. The thing is, usually you can tell if the compression is good this way, but if it falls quickly, it doesn't necessarily mean it's bad. Different units weigh different amounts and have different CC engines, so the results will vary.
 
  #11  
Old 03-09-04, 09:58 AM
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I've always had good luck using a compression gage. Look for at least 80 pounds for a good starting engine. 100 pounds would be a typical reading I see. If you have a compression tester you've had for a while and you test a wide variety of engines on it you will soon get to know what readings are typical and which ones show marginal engine conditions. Don't forget to make sure you are using full throttle with the choke off before you test. Otherwise you might not get enough air to the cylinder for a good test.
 
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