Gas string trimmers

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  #1  
Old 04-05-04, 06:12 PM
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Gas string trimmers

Hey fellas!!!!! I was just curious, how do all the consumer model gas string trimmers compaare? I ask because lately I have pretty much become tired of lugging 100 to 200 feet of cord around the yard and the gas trimmer I recently used has got me to realise how easy they are to use and how much more powerful they are than the electric ones. We have a Ryobi electric trimmer and it has served the purpose for years and still performs great, but the cord is VERY aggrivating. My dad bought a craftsman gas trimmer and right away I noticed it is running on the lean side. So much to the point that it kills when it is given throttle. This thing has only been used 2 or 3 times. So I took a look at the adjusting screws and I noticed that not only are there plugs over the screws, but these plugs are pressed in flush with the carb and to be able to reach the plugs I would need to dismantle the trimmer. This trimmer is the trimmer/brush cutter model and works great except for the lean running condition. I have used homlites in the past and they are pretty light and cheap. Considering all the cheaper consumer models (i.e. homelite, ryobi, craftsman, poulan, etc...) what is the best bang for the buck? Any ones to stay away from? My parents only have two acres so this trimmer will probably just be seeing some use once a week. Thanks for any advice guys!!!!!!!

P.S. Cheese, I remember you mentioned a long time ago a general rule of thumb for the amount of pulls it should take to start a trimmer or chainsaw. After pull starting it that certain amount of times and it still don't start, then you can figure something is wrong. What is that rule of thumb????? Thanks buddy.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-06-04, 12:30 AM
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Usually if you have to pull it more than 3 times, something is not right. One pull to get some gas into the chamber, one for it to start on choke, and choke out, and the last pull for it to crank up and run on half choke until it warms up so you can open the choke and go to work.

I think the cheaper homeowner trimmers pretty much run neck and neck as far as quality and longevity. I guess if I had to buy a cheaper trimmer, I would probably go with homelite since they seem to be marginally stronger and less aggravating. If you can, do yourself a favor and save some money (in the long run) and aggravation, and get an Echo, Stihl, Robin, or some kind of higher end trimmer. You'll spend less time with broken parts and sore arms.
 
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Old 04-06-04, 03:36 PM
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Before you buy!!!

Hold it! With all due respect to Cheese, don't buy a Homelite. Why? You ask. You'll find it extremely difficult to find repair parts when that time comes, period. And that time will come. I suggest a Craftsman on the Big Box (lower) end and a Echo, Stihl or Shindaiwa on the dealer (upper) end. You should have no trouble finding a dealer in your area for any of these. Incidently, Craftsman hand-held equipment is made by Electrolux (Poulan) and for the buck is a decent machine. Just don't buy the "Featherlite" models which are the least expensive models available. Stay over $100.00 and you should be good.
 
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Old 04-06-04, 10:44 PM
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I don't have any problems getting homelite parts at all. Of course, like the other lower end trimmers, it is still basically a disposable trimmer, and by the time it needs much in the way of parts it is ready for replacement anyway. They're cheap enough to replace every few years.
 
  #5  
Old 04-07-04, 05:19 AM
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"My 2 Cents"

Hello: mower17

You stated it best. "I was just curious, how do all the consumer model gas string trimmers compaare?

Key words are "consumer model gas string trimmers." Consumer indicates and or implies homeowner and or causual user. Not a commerical model.

Thus a consumer model is not built for commerical daily use but rather for a competitive price at a lower quality. One tends to get what one pays for.

Based upon your intended usage, the non commerical model will serve you well, if price is a factor. Intended usage is stated in your question as "My parents only have two acres so this trimmer will probably just be seeing some use once a week." Definition of a causal user.

If you think it is aggrivating to drag a cord around, which I can agree can be annoying but not to a point of being aggrivating, wait till the engine does not start from any one of the multiple causes based on the questions asked in this forum topic.

Or when the compression becomes lower with usage. The starting than becomes harder as well as all the other symptoms of low compression.

Toss in any one or two of the other type of engine problems and difficulties and an electric machine suddenly seems more appealing to the causual user.

Regarding the lean running condition, return the machine for a fix. Should have no problem on that issue. The retailer will correct any problem which exists because the machine is new.

In the context of asking for advice, the machine already purhased will serve well for it's intended purpose once it is serviced and running well for many years to come. "My Two Cents."

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice.
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  #6  
Old 04-07-04, 01:20 PM
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While dragging under 100 feet of cord isn't bad, it's the far ends of the yard that are nearly impossible. To trim them, it takes 200 - 300 feet of cord!!! That just becomes a pain, though you are right about the gas trimmers, when they don't start they really become a down right pain.
 
  #7  
Old 04-07-04, 04:45 PM
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Since you are learning engines, you should have no problem fixing them yourself. Look at me, I do it. I never take my equipment to somebody to fix. I am learning more and more everyday about engines. Soon I will be a expert and therefor will no longer have to asks questions on this site. But untill that time comes, I will get as much advice as possible. Which mower are you going to buy soldier?
 
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Old 04-07-04, 07:13 PM
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My grampa is leaning towards craftsman mainly for availability of parts. If he ever needs a part he can have is mailed to his house. He would like to buy a john deere but doesn't like the price. He will probably get one this summer.
 
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