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flat tubeless tire


cabbageleaf's Avatar
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04-14-04, 05:39 PM   #1  
cabbageleaf
flat tubeless tire

Can anybody share any knowledge about my lawn tractor tire that went flat? In the past it had a small leak that i've been reinflating with no problems. Suddenly the whole tire became unattached from the edges of the rim and the air will not form a seal around the edges where it meets the rim. Is this tire a lost cause or is there a hope before i have to take it into the shop. From what i can see it is a 14 psi max. tubeles 15x600-6 any info. would be of great help...Thanks

 
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04-14-04, 05:47 PM   #2  
This is what you have to do. You need a bucket and dish soap and a rag. Get the bucket of watter really soapy. Then clean the rims with that soapy rag. Don't ring it out, your going to use that soapy foam to help seal the tire to the rim. Put alot of soapy watter/foam on and around the rims. Once you complete one tire, then use a compressor to pump the tire up. You may have to tie a rope around the tire to help hold it to the rim. I did this on my lawn tractor so I know it works. But you do need a compressor, if you don't have one, than try to rent one. Because you need the PSI and volume that it produces. Once complete than go onto the next tire using the same thing. Please let us know how it goes.

PS: Once your done with all tires, you can use a foam sealent that comes in a can, and you fill the tires up with that. The stuff works very well as long as you don't have huge holes in the tires. If they are small the foam sealent will do its job. It works for me. You might have to deflate the tires a little ways before using the stuff. It depends on how much air you put in there. Usually the max PSI rating on lawn tractor tires range from 10 to 20 PSI. Remember aftor using the foam sealent, you must shoot some air back into the tire anyway to get the foam away from the air inlet.

 
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04-14-04, 06:06 PM   #3  
cabbageleaf
flat tubeless tire

I will try that and post back. Thank you

 
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04-14-04, 10:49 PM   #4  
If it still leaks after the above advice, then simply install a tube in the tire.

fred

 
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04-15-04, 05:10 AM   #5  
I say, simply install a tube and be done with it.
Term, as for fix-a-flat: This product is designed for automobiles which spin at a good rate, relying on centrifugal force to be effective. Lawn mowers just can't provide that force. Furthermore, save your mechanic the aggravation of having to clean the mess it makes when you just can't remove a bead to install a tube. We do many tire repairs in a week here, and just one with goobly-gock can ruin your day.

 
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04-15-04, 01:12 PM   #6  
cabbageleaf
installing a tube

If i have to install a tube, is there a standard size tube to get? Will there be a new valve stem that i will have to use on the tube and how would i secure the new valve stem to the existing rim?

 
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04-15-04, 01:17 PM   #7  
cabbageleaf
in other words...

Can someone tell me what size tube to get and how to install it, and if i have to rip the old valve stem from the rim........thx

 
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04-15-04, 01:27 PM   #8  
I had 14 leaks in one tire on the tractor mower. A can of fix a flat fixed it right up and had the wife back out cutting the grass. its been 2 years and its still up.



ED

 
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04-15-04, 01:29 PM   #9  
cabbageleaf
LOL.......10-4

 
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04-15-04, 03:55 PM   #10  
Tubular!

You will go and buy a tube the same size as the tire (15X6.00-6). You will merely have to remove the existing valve stem by means of diagonal cutters or similar method. Be sure to remove the part which will fall off into the rim as well. The new tube will already have the stem, just feed it out the now vacant hole from which you removed the tubeless stem (they are different). Only thing is that you'll find it much easier to installl the tube with the bead (from the same side of the rim as the stem hole) dismounted. That is you will have to work the bead off the rim by whatever means you have available - likely two large flat-blade screwdrivers. If you don't do this, it can still be done, just much more difficult to feed in the new tube without kinking it. Let us know how it goes.

 
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04-15-04, 04:11 PM   #11  
Ed Imeduc... I am with you on this one all the way. I don't believe in tubes. Too much trouble!

 
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04-15-04, 04:54 PM   #12  
cabbageleaf
Here are my results

I borrowed a compresser (which is my next purchase) I tried like heck to reinflate that tire, spare the rope i had to wrap my chainhoist around it for it to initially catch the edges of the rim (with soapy
water)thats when i found out where it was leaking from the whole time.
I knew that was'nt gonna last because i saw it bubbling and seaping thru the soapy. Next i debated the fix a flat can sitting right beside me but after reading how messy that stuff was i was willing to try the tube method instead. Bought the tube installed it just like that one reply said and it worked like a charm. I want to thank everyone who replied, i'm grateful to this website with so much info. to us backyard mechanics...take care

 
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04-15-04, 09:12 PM   #13  
Glad you got your tires back no matter what option you chose!

 
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04-15-04, 11:56 PM   #14  
Good job cabbageleaf!

Glad you got it fixed. I also despise that fix-a-flat. When it works, it's usually just temporary unless it's just tiny holes. The bigger problem is it makes a sloppy gooey mess inside the wheel. No problem, unless you ever have to take the tire off. Then, if you can get the tire off, and the rim is still good, you'll have that mess all over you, your hands, your clothes, and...good luck washing it off. The upside...it doesn't take tire removal or any work to speak of to shoot some in there, it's quick and easy in the short haul.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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07-04-05, 03:30 PM   #15  
dbeard
Thanks for the tip

Terminator20 -

Thanks for the tip, I had alot of trouble getting my flat tire to seat properly. I ended up having to twist a wire (I had no rope) which I wrapped around the tire and tied a knot through which I slipped a screwdriver which I could turn like a tourniquet to get the tire close enough to the rim to stay while I put in enough air to hold the tire in place.

Thanks again,
Dave

 
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07-06-05, 04:09 PM   #16  
MaryJane
Mower's flat tire

I've been in the same situation and to get a tube for the tire is less than $6 and any auto garage can install it; this will ensure the tire doesn't go flat again as you stated it had a lead previously. If the tire is not wounded with a continual lead and just flattened from standing, then an auto garage can reseal it just like a car tire and you'll be set to go! I've been in both of these situations with a riding mower and large leaf blower!

 
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04-22-08, 06:26 PM   #17  
Tip for tubeless inflation

I just finished fixed a flat tire (a front tire on a zero turning radius Husquavarna) and the trick I used was to take a ratchet strap and run it around the circumference of the wheel....this helped hold the wheel to the rim to allow it to inflate without all the air escaping...It worked great but I had to be careful to remove the strap quickly before I put too much pressure in the tire.

FYI

 
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