chain saw starting problem

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  #1  
Old 04-24-04, 07:42 PM
tnttom25
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chain saw starting problem

hi, i'm searching for an answer on what the high and low needle sets should be set at? tia for any one who knows!!! i have a homelite textron model 10045c. it fires up for a few seconds and that is it replaced spark plug and did carb kit, float not adjusted right? help
 
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  #2  
Old 04-24-04, 09:46 PM
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Hi there. This post belongs in the outdoor power equipment and small engines forum, not the tools forum. It very well may that you did not install it corectly. But if you can make the float go up and down easily, your float is probably fine. Make sure the needle valve was properly installed. And as far as the sparkplug is conserned. If you replaced it with the propper plug, you should be fine. To help you better, can you post your engine model numbers? Thanks...
 
  #3  
Old 04-25-04, 08:03 AM
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Homey

The chainsaw your referring to does not have a float, it is a diaphragm type carburetor. You said you installed a carb. kit but I wonder three things. 1- Did you soak the carburetor before reconditioning, in a quality bath type cleaner? 2- Did you install the diaphragms and gaskets in the proper order? 3-Is the inlet needle lever set to the correct height? As for the hi and low fuel mixture adjustments...begin with each one at 1 and 1/4 turns out from fully seated position. If ALL else is OK, this will allow the engine to start and run. You will then need to do a final adjustment once the engine is at operating temperature...typically 1 turn out from seated.
 
  #4  
Old 04-25-04, 08:43 AM
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Hello: tnttom25. Welcome to our Do-It-Yourself Web Site and the Small Engine forum.

2 cycle diaphram carbs can be difficult to rebuild. Often very small carbs and 2 cycle engines are sensitive & temperamental to minor fuel flow requirements and engine demands, etc.

The fuel flow through the carb may still not be correct and or not flowing thru the carb in the quantity needed. Check fuel flow out of the tank to insure the volume is full flow and steady.

Based on the problem described, >engine starts than dies,< indicates some fuel is getting to the carb. The above than applies first. >Check fuel flow out of the tank.<

If the fuel flow is restricted, etc, no amount of carb adjustments will correct the problem. Once that is assured to be okay, than you can move on to the carb and the carb settings.

Carb Adjustment Basics:

Carb screw settings may be overly or underly adjusted.
Be sure they are reset back to the original adjustment settings.
The screw with the {"L"} marking is the Low Speed screw.
The screw with the {"H"} marking is the High Speed screw.

Best method is to turn the "H" screw out 2 turns and fire up the engine. With the engine running full speed, adjust the "H" screw outwards until the engine exhaust burns slightly black and or blue smoke.

Then turn the same screw inwards until the engine just starts to run too lean. This may be indicated by a drastically or slightly increased speed just before the engine appears to die slightly or totally.

The center point between the 2 extremes is often times but not always, the best setting. On a 2 cycle engine. A slightly rich fuel mixture is best.

The reason is, the incoming fuel helps to cool the engine slightly, adds the fuel which is also the engines lubricant and the fuel mixture is also the engines speed governor.

A too lean fuel mixture will allow the engine to run at a higher top speed but also causes it to run hotter. A higher top speed will also drastically decrease engine performance under load and service life expectancy.

The same procedure is used for the "L" low speed fuel adjustment. When the carb is adjusted correctly, all speeds will run fine and there will not be any hesitation between idle and a quick jump into high speed.

All the above are based upon an engine in good mechanical condition & running condition, a carb that is correctly functioning, a correctly operating fuel flow system and ignition system.

Most likely I have not covered all of the potential problems. The other resident small engine service and repair professionals may offer additional suggestions, advice & help. Check back several times for additional replies.

Read the other topic postings and replies offered on this subject of engines that fail to start and or run poorly, within this forum, for additional help & information on this topic.

Regardless of 2 or 4 cycle engine, the info contained within prior questions pertaining to engines which have carb problems, run poorly, have starting problems associated with carb conditions, etc and for the most part, are all similarly and or exactly the same.

If you need further assistance, use the reply button to add any and all additional information, etc. By doing so, the additional information you add will remain within this posting. Using this method also moves the topic back up to the top of the list automatically.

Basic Carb Info:
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=76028

Carb Adjustment (Chainsaw) Web Site Help Page:
http://www.madsens1.com/sawtune.htm

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice. Web Site Host, Forums Monitor & Small Engine Forum Moderator. "Accurate Power Equipment Company"
Small Engine Diagnostics Services and Repair.
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Last edited by Sharp Advice; 04-25-04 at 08:54 AM.
  #5  
Old 04-25-04, 09:14 AM
tnttom25
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all is well

thanx for the input! someone had told me that u set the seats in and turn them out 1/16 to 1/8 and go from there, so after reading the replies it took about two minutes to be up and running. also your(puey61) right its a diaphram float and next time i'll try to post in the right forum(terminator20). sorry, and thanx to all for the visuals and advice. god the internet is an awesome and endless tool, huh!!! happy sunday guys
 
  #6  
Old 04-25-04, 09:50 AM
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Hi: tnttom25

The referrence to 1/8 or 1/16th of a turn on the adjustment screws refers to making the fine tuning adjustments, not the initial settings. Which means someone (whomever that was) provided you with the incorrect advice and or misunderstand the intent of the adjustments, etc.

Once the engine is running, fine tuning is or can be done if needed. That is what the 1/16 and or 1/8th adjustments refer to.

Within the guide lines mentioned above. Too rich a fuel mixture provided by the carb causes problems. Same applies to too lean a mixture. Lean is worse for two cycle engines for the reasons stated prior.

Use the machine safely.
Have a good day.
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  #7  
Old 05-09-04, 06:27 PM
Otoe
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Fine Tuning Adjustments

Please post the information about the carb fine tuning adjustment for
chain saws (1/8 or 1/16 turns). After the initial adjustments, how is the
carb fine tuned? As my Poulan stalls when accelerated. How are the
caps removed to make L/H adjustments?

Much appreciated,

Otoe
 
  #8  
Old 05-09-04, 06:34 PM
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To remove the caps, use a pair of plyers, and grip hard and pull outward hard, that should do it. Let us know how it goes.
 
  #9  
Old 05-09-04, 06:59 PM
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Hello: Otoe

Small 2 cycle engines that stumble, bog down or stall during acceleration from idle to high speed can be caused by any of several possibilites.

If the engine stalls when attempt to accelerate, the low speed adjustment is too low, providing the carb is in proper working order.

Both the low speed speeding and the high speed setting are needed to run the engine at high speeds. But the low speed setting has to be correct or the engine stumbles and or dies.

Another most likely problem for engine stumblings between idle and high speed acceleration is the carb adjustments. Based upon the problem description and all else being operational, the LOW speed fuel adjustment is too LEAN.

Keeping in mind that both the high and low speed adjustments supply fuel to the engine at the same time and work together to allow the engine to run correctly.

When the LOW speed adjustment is too LEAN, the engine will idle but it will also bog down, stumble, stall and or fail to run well at high speeds or when attempting to accelerate.

When the LOW speed adjustment is too LEAN, the engine will idle but it will also bog down, stumble and or stall when attempting to accelerate.

To correct the condition, once the engine is warmed up & running on idle, increase the LOW {L} speed fuel setting until the engine just begins to run fuel rich. Then turn the LOW {L} fuel screw in slightly.

When the engine will accelerate from idle to high speed without bogging down, stumbling or stalling, adjust the HIGH {H} speed fuel screw until the engine runs slighly fuel rich.

Once you remove the caps, slightly increase the low setting screw while the engine is running at a low speed. Turn screw until black or blackist & blueish smoke appears. Than turn screw inwards slightly so engine will run at idle and not flood out.

Carb Adjustment (Chainsaw) Web Site Help Page:
http://www.madsens1.com/sawtune.htm

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice.
Master Small Engine Tech. Web Site Host, Forums Monitor and Multiple Topics Moderator. "Accurate Power Equipment Company." Engine Diagnostics Services & Repair. Fast...Fair...Friendly & Highly Proficient Services....
 
  #10  
Old 05-09-04, 07:15 PM
Otoe
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Thanks Sharp Advice. I'll give it a try in the morning. I have a rebuilt
Poulan that never accelerated without feathering it to high speed after
starting initially. My prior 16" Poulan never experienced this problem but
then I bought it new versus rebuilt. I'm sure it is a minor adjustment issue.

Otoe
 
  #11  
Old 05-10-04, 02:13 PM
Otoe
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Successful Adjustment

Sharp Advice,

Used your recommendation to adjust the L out until it started to
run rough and backed it in until it ran smoothly (about a quarter or
half turn). I now have a smooth acceleration to high speed on
the Poulan chainsaw. Pulled out the caps with not much problem
as well. Any problem with leaving the limiting adjustment caps off?
The adjustment screws seem tight enough.

Otoe
 
  #12  
Old 05-10-04, 02:19 PM
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Not at all. The caps are limiters. They are designed to keep people from messing up the engine. But DOITYOURSELF'S like us, usually don't make those mistakes because we are careful. You should be fine without those caps. Just toss them. Glad you got it running good!
 
  #13  
Old 05-10-04, 02:48 PM
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Limiter caps

There is only one drawback from removing the caps...as you know, most two strokers vibrate alot, especially chainsaws. The adjusting screws may vibrate in or out without them. No problem now, though, that you know how to adjust and tune. If you notice the engine running rough, go ahead and readjust the needles.
 
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