Engine dies under load

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  #1  
Old 06-06-04, 06:38 PM
Kushballz
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Question Engine dies under load

Hi Everybody,

This is the same engine I posted a message on before. It has another problem now... When I start it, it backfires, and when I finally get it to start, it dies when under a load. I have cleaned the carburetor, adjusted it properly, cleaned the valve seats, the head, and relinked the govenor because the rod that connected to the govenor arm went in the engine. It used to start and run fine before I had the oil leak. I plugged the hole (where the govenor arm used to be) where it was leaking the oil from and tried to run it with and without it plugged and it made no differance. Again, everything is adjusted to manufacturer settings and then fine tuned, carburetor wise... Can anybody help??


Thanks,
Danny
 
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  #2  
Old 06-06-04, 09:53 PM
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I don't remember all the particulars from the origional post. Where is the governor now? Why did you have to relink? Most engines have a fly-weight governor geared to the crank or cam located inside the crankcase. The governor rod usually exits out the crankcase somewhere and is linked via a rod to the carburator.

There should also be a small spring that opposes the governor that will tend to hold the throttle open. The hand throttle should change the tension on this spring when moved. In other words, the governor only tends to close the throttle and the governor spring only tends to open the throttle.

In your case, it sounds like you may not be choking or priming the engine before you attempt to start it. It also sounds like the governor may be in need of some adjustment. When the mower engine is off and the hand throttle adjusted for "slow", the governor spring should be forcing the throttle plate in the carburator to it's wide open position. If you don't see that then you will need to make some adjustments.

Let us know some more particulars about the governor and why you had to make the changes you did.
 
  #3  
Old 06-07-04, 12:29 AM
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here is the old thread about this same engine: http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=167849

It dies under a load because it has no governor. This thing really is in need of some work for it to ever run right again.
 
  #4  
Old 06-07-04, 02:56 PM
Kushballz
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Ok. I was starting the engine last summer after cleaning and rebuilding the carburetor, and then it wouldn't start, so I put it on choke again, and cranked it up. Then I heard a ching noise and I looked around for what it could've been, and found the governor arm on the foot rest. I have no clue to where the governor rod is other than maybe it went into the crankcase. I relinked the carburetor in a way that when the lever is on choke, it will choke it and open the throttle just about (90%) all the way. When I do choke it, the carburetor will flood. The only way it will run is when I put it on slow (with the throttle nearly closed). Even on slow it will sputter and die. It sounds like a overly rich ratio, but it will still do that with the screws almost closed... Is there a way you can show me how to relink the carburetor without the governor? How is the throttle position supposed to be on choke? Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Danny
 
  #5  
Old 06-07-04, 06:01 PM
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My only thought is that you will have to open up the engine and fix the governor. The governor isn't a useless frill on a lawn mower engine. It has a function that is very necessary for the proper operation of the engine. Cheese is absolutely right. The mower will never run right until you fix the governor. I'm sorry I don't have a "magic bullet" that will easily solve your problem, but it is what it is, and that's broke.

If it will make you feel any better, I've had engines that have thrown the weights off the governor and left it in mangled pieces on the bottom of the crankcase. You best deal with the problem soon because someday one of those pieces will get caught by the swinging throw on the crank shaft. That small piece can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time. It's a cheap fix now, but it could get a lot more expensive, quick. You'll have to ask yourself each time you start'er up: "Do I feel lucky?"
 

Last edited by jughead; 06-07-04 at 06:12 PM.
  #6  
Old 06-08-04, 11:58 AM
Kushballz
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thanks you guys, you're great! I'll have to take the engine out (again unfortunately) and fix the governor (grrr...)

Thanks,
Danny
 
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