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breaking starter ropes on Sears weedwacker


older'ndirt's Avatar
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10-11-04, 03:47 PM   #1  
breaking starter ropes on Sears weedwacker

I have a Sears (Poulan) model 358.795160 32cc straight shaft weedwacker. Each season since new (2002) I've replaced at least two broken starter ropes. The problem appears to be that, when you pull, not only are you rotating the crankshaft but also the entire drive shaft and cutter assembly. This makes for a jerky and difficult pull and must put quite a strain on that 1/8th inch rope. Looking at the latest model, I see a clutch has been installed. Wonder why? Other than a reto-fit clutch, is there anything I can do to alleviate this problem? When running it's a serious trimmer and does the job well.

 
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10-11-04, 04:06 PM   #2  
cando
Older--
Are you sure that you did not replace the original rope with one that is too short. Just a suggestion but, put as much rope on the reel as it will hold and still retract. I had this problem with a Mower when I had the rope too short. Or, maybe you just have a "Boarding House Reach" that comes to the end of the rope before you run out of arm. Good luck. Stronger Rope?? maybe.
Cando

 
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10-11-04, 05:42 PM   #3  
breaking starter ropes on Sears weedwacker

Cando
Thanks for the thought. The pulley gets as much as I can wind onto it - seems like enough. The thing always starts - 'til the rope breaks. The business of trying to rotate the crankshaft which is, simultaneously, rotating the driveshaft which is geared to turn the cutter assembly is asking a bit much of that starter rope. Ideally there should be a rope made of kevlar, just like fishing line.

 
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10-12-04, 12:23 AM   #4  
You might try lubricating the flex shaft and bushing at the end of the boom.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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10-12-04, 07:56 AM   #5  
cheese
Thanks - I'll certainly give that a try. With the new models having a clutch, pretty much eliminating my problem, there's that nagging suspicion that mine is basically a lousy design and will continue to give agony as long as it's around. If there's some kind of miracle rope (strengthwise) out there, I'd sure like to hear about it.

 
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10-13-04, 12:19 AM   #6  
Any better small engine shop should have high quality cord...especially the shops that service commercial equipment (like saws for logging industry, etc...).


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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10-13-04, 11:30 AM   #7  
breaking starter rope?

Might be the rope is catching on the shroud cover?
Look for burrs and sharp edges where the rope exits the shroud.
My 0.02 cents worth.
T.J.

 
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10-16-04, 07:28 PM   #8  
cando
breaking rope

I own two Homelites that have the same "No Clutch" design and I have never broken a rope. Granted they are 25cc units so they might be easier to pull. I think the lube suggestion is a good one. Also, I wonder where is the rope breaking? If it is at either end you might evaluate whether the rope is being frayed or cut, causing early failure. Maybe you need to tie a different knot that doesn't leave the rope as vulnerable to wear on the end. If you are really at "the end of your rope" (sorry) and determined to keep this trimmer I can suggest some 7X7 Aircraft cable that will jerk the crankshaft out before it breaks. Lots a luck.

 
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10-19-04, 08:10 AM   #9  
cando
Nice pun there. Though I just got through putting it back together, curiosity about your ideas and those of the others will surely make me do it again. It's getting a little damp, here in Washington, but it's all still growing so I'll need to use it at least once more. Aircraft cable is good stuff - I depended on it for many years.

 
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