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She just quits...for no reason...Ha!


gandl2123's Avatar
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11-01-04, 05:17 AM   #1  
gandl2123
She just quits...for no reason...Ha!

95-98 Intek 190 6Hp Pressure Washer motor. This is a 12HOHV Model with engine family: VBS205U1G1RA:EM.

Now, here is what is happening. I've had the carb apart and cleaned as I bought this from a yard sale for 50.00. Replaced the pressure pump with one off of Ebay rated for 6hp motor. The thing starts right up when cold and runs. The pressure washer (when the button is pushed on the trigger) pulls the motor down and sometimes I can run with just the usual engine cycling and sometimes the thing just shuts off mid spray. It is very hard do start and when it does start (choking it) it will run fine for a minute and then shut off instantly. No warning or fluttering (except for the typical cycling) but just shuts off.

Now, I have cleaned the carb and I know quite a bit about the engines and carb cleaning as I have been through the Foley Belsaw Small Engine Institute 1983...ha. But, the spring on the throttle that goes to the govenor may be the culprit. I can manually hold the throttle valve (at unhealthy rev) and keep her running but on her own it flips back and forth and runs like crap and shuts off. How can I fix this problem short of what I'm planning....buying a new carb? If I knew that would fix the problem I would buy one in a heartbeat but I would absolutely die if I bought a new carb for this great motor and then it did the same.....Tks for any input / insight to help me.

Greg
Augusta, GA
PS Please also send a copy of your answers to [email protected] as I sometimes don't get back to the internet. Thanks!

 
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jughead's Avatar
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11-01-04, 06:20 AM   #2  
The governor spring tends to force the throttle open and the governor itself tends to force the throttle closed. There are two opposing forces working against each other to control the actual throttle setting. If an increased load is applied to the engine, the engine will slow down some. The reduced speed will result is less force produced by the governor flyweights. Since the spring will now be a little stronger it will push the throttle open and the engine speed will return to normal. The increased engine load will be carried by an increased throttle setting at the same engine speed as before. Now, if that same load if removed from the engine, the engine will speed up a little. That increased engine speed will result is a little larger centrifugal force generated by the governor flyweights. That force will close the throttle until it balances with the spring force at a lower setting. The engine should again be running at the same speed with the reduced load and a lower throttle setting. If you look at an engine that's stopped you should see that the throttle is at a wide open setting. That makes sense because there is no centrifual force produced by the flyweights so the governor spring pulls the throttle all the way open.

In your particular situation I suspect that the governor spring isn't at fault at all. Usually, in a situation like you described, the carburator mixture is set too lean. As the load increases the throttle opens, but since the the carb isn't right, the increased throttle doesn't produce more power to balance the load.
You could also have a problem with your ignition system. Some engines have a low oil shutdown. Have you checked your oil carefully? Is some of the water spray getting into the engine?

I might try adjusting the carburator for best engine running under load. This can be tricky because you have to manually hold the throttle open to obtain the engine speed you want. You can't remove the load during this operation or your engine will instantly overspeed. If the engine suddenly quits during this trial you will know that the governor isn't at fault.

 
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