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pressure washers


sandy2000's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2000
Posts: 198

11-22-04, 08:19 AM   #1  
pressure washers

I'm looking for pros/cons of pressure washers. Residential use only, driveway approx 30' x 40'. Would like to use on the cars if pressure not too much. Can you point me in the right direction? Thanks

 
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Terminator20's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 865

11-22-04, 12:29 PM   #2  
If you have a small driveway and you also will do small decks, then a 1500 PSI will do fine for you. If you have a large driveway and or large deck, then a 2400 would be more suited. If the job your doing is really small, you can get away with a little electric unit. A 2400 Gas unit will run you at least $400.00
A 1500 gas unit will run at least $200.00 A Electric will run you probably around $100.00 or less. Good brands would be Honda, Porter Cable, Dewalt, ETC. What is important to look for if your going to buy a gas unit is to make sure you get a horisontal unit. A vertical engine on a presure washer does not last long, not very good. Horisontal units are much better. Another choice in picking a presure washer is if you want it to syphen cleaning fluids threw it. With the information I have given you so far you should be able to pick one out for yourself.

 
cheese's Avatar
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 16,567
GA

11-23-04, 12:33 AM   #3  
Hello Sandy!

If the unit will only be for occasional use, I would reccomend an electric model. Gas ones never seem to run when you need them if they sit unused for a while.

Pros of a PW: can remove mud/dirt from surfaces without scratching them, Can reach places that would be difficult to reach without one, can do a lot of work in a small amount of time, higher pressure models can remove old paint, dead surface wood, and grease/grime/and mold.

Cons of a PW: Gas ones can be troublesome if not used regularly, inexpensive gas models are not durable and wind up breaking prematurely in many (most) cases, Can make water get into places you didn't want it to go, can marr the surface of wood, can wash off things you didn't want removed if pressure is too high or wand is held to close or has wrong spray tip.

A pressure washer is a very helpful, almost invaluable tool. You'll find so many uses for it if you get one, and wonder how you ever got by without one.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
slumlordfrank's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 702
CO

11-23-04, 06:32 AM   #4  
I'm not certain what the recent (past 5 years) fascination is with pressure washers. I guess it's a function of lower prices for power tools coming from Asia and increase in disposable income in this country.

Over the past 25 years I've painted the exteriors of about 50-60 houses, a couple of them twice, and I've had more than my fair share of really cruddy looking driveways and garage floors from scummy tenants leaking lots of oil, AND I'VE NEVER OWNED, OR USED A PRESSURE WASHER.

I have a couple of neighbors who pressure wash their driveways every couple of months, particularly after the real heavy rains that we have during the time that leaves are falling anyway. It seems a bit pointless, THE ONLY THING YOU DO ON A DRIVEWAY IS PARK THE CAR OR DRIVE INTO THE GARAGE. It's not like it's being used for food preparation or performing minor surgery.

Prepping the exterior of a house for painting? Nope, I prefer a mixture of TSP and bleach, occassional use of a long-handle brush if something is sticky. I've never had a problem getting paint to adhere. And I've never had any of the following problems that I've seen others have when using a PW inappropriately: blowing off roof shingles, water intrusion around doors and windows, blowing holes in really soft (rotten) siding, actually maybe the last one was good.

Cleaning a really cruddy driveway: Best thing is oil-dri or kitty litter, then soak it down with strong cleaner and maybe bleach, use a heavy (steel) brush, let bleach soak on it for as long as you can get it to stay in one place. Face it you're not going to totally remove the stain, and you can stand there wasting water all day trying.

Just my 2 cents.

Frank

 
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