What are my options for a tank or carb swap?

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Old 01-09-05, 06:23 PM
Biased-Ply
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What are my options for a tank or carb swap?

Hi, I'm new to this forum so bear with me..........

I have a Briggs & Stratton engine model 80232 Type 1667-01 Code 85062503. I believe it's 3hp. I have it on my homebuilt go-kart and want/need to get a Comet Torq-A-Verter torque converter. The problem is that when installed on my engine, the jackshaft bearing and axle that sticks out the backside of the mounting plate hits my gas tank. The guys at my local lawn mower shop said that the one I have is the only tank shown to fit my engine and carb. I want to know if there's a gas tank from a different brand motor or just another briggs tank that will work on my setup. I am willing to change carbs if it means that I can get a smaller gas tank to go with it. I just don't know what carb would fit my engine and what size tank it would work with. I just need a smaller tank. It could be thinner or just more shallow or it could mount in a different place. It just needs to clear the torq converter. Thanks for reading, any info will be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 01-10-05, 08:54 AM
Azis
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Well I don't have a straight up answer fer ya, sounds like you may be in for some modin, although I would think some one else has run into this problem b4. Here is a site that sells performance parts n such for briggs n other go karts items. http://www.compgoparts.com/technical/ Perhaps they have a ready made solution.

GL
 
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Old 01-10-05, 04:53 PM
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I don't know of any special or different sized fuel tanks for your Briggs. engine. There are racing classes that use the Briggs. tank pretty much stock but other than that everyone goes to an external (separate) fuel tank with a fuel pump that is driven by manifold pressure or crank case pulses.
 
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Old 01-10-05, 07:09 PM
Biased-Ply
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how does that fuel pump work exactly? Are there kits you can buy that work for my engine, or is there significant modding to be done for a seperate tank and fuel pump to work? Thanks for the info
 
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Old 01-10-05, 08:04 PM
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I am not aware of any other tank made for that model or readily adaptable. A 5hp flathead engine has the clearance needed for a comet clutch, but I've never tried putting one on a 3.
 
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Old 01-11-05, 03:19 PM
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Sorry Biased-Ply, I forgot to mention that you need a different carb to run a remote fuel tank. The stock Briggs. carb that sits on top of the fuel tank has a fuel pump built in and there is no port to hook up a fuel line for a remote tank.

How much is the fuel tank interfering with the Comet clutch? If it is not too much you can dent/bash in part of the fuel tank with a hammer. Mount your Comet clutch to the engine and note where it hits the fuel tank and by how much. Remove the fuel tank from the engine and carb. Pour out all the gas and rinse the tank out with water (don't want a spark from your hammer to make it go boom). Put the fuel tank on a pile of rags or set it in your lap. Use a medium sized hammer (about 16-24 ounces) and start tapping in the area that was hitting your clutch. Start easy and gradually hit harder and harder until you make small dents. Many softer taps are better than one big hit. You want to slowly work the dent up to the size you need. If you screw-up new tanks are about $35.00

Do not try hammering on your tank while it is bolted to the engine or carb. Hammering when it's mounted may crack/break your carb. A new carb. costs about $70.00
 
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Old 01-11-05, 08:40 PM
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Thanks for the idea Pilot Dane. I never thought of just "persuading" the tank to have clearance. I think i might have come up with my own solution. Wouldn't it work to mount the torque converter at a downward slant? Up till now I have thought that the torque converter must be mounted so that the whole mounting plate and everything would be parrael to the ground. Couldn't I mount it slanted so that it goes on the driveshaft but slants down so that the jackshaft axle housing will be lower than the gas tank? I can't actually try it since I don't own a torque converter yet, but I've looked at them at a Northern store. There are plenty of mount holes for mounting variuos ways and such. I would think that there would be holes that would mount the torque converter slanted, and therefore clear the tank. Let me now what you think about this idea. I guess if my idea proves faulty, the best choice would be to just dent the tank to fit. Thanks again for all your input.
 
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Old 01-11-05, 11:56 PM
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You can use the clutch at any angle.
 
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Old 01-12-05, 03:29 AM
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As Cheese mentioned you can mount the torque converter at any angle. There is no oil or anything inside to worry about.

When you run your cart for the first few times, pay attention to the pull your chain puts on the torque converter when mounted at an odd angle. It will be like a wrench pulling up or down trying to twist your engine. I don't think you will have much trouble with a 3 hp engine so don't worry about it too much. Make sure you use as many of the mounting holes (4?) on your torque converter that you can, and make sure all the motor mount bolts are installed and are tight.
 
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Old 01-12-05, 04:26 PM
Biased-Ply
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I'm glad it should work, guess I just need to find $160 for that Torque converter. You mentioned tightening the engine mounting bolts; I have rubber spacers between the engine mounting plate and the frame. Will those cause a problem? Maybe cause some flexing that will hurt things? I was going to put some spacers between the engine and mounting plate but figured that the engine bottom needed more support than just on the four corners. The rubber spacers are just for vibration dampening.

Also one off-topic question... Do racing karts use torque converters? For some reason I don't think they do. Why would you ever use a regular clutch with only one gear when you can have a torque converter that's like a automatic trasmission? Reason I want to know is that I'm only 15 and have a limited cash flow. If i'm going to drop $160 into a torque converter, I want to make sure that it will be worth it. By the way, the kart I have is a small one seater that my dad and I built from a really old lawnmower frame and a 3hp water pump engine. I don't need to go super fast or go through deep mud, I just want to be able to comfortably ride around on grass fields and some mud, but still be able to beat the kids in my neighborhood that have those little pocket rocket bikes from Pep Boys. Right now I can hit about 30 mph( but I have a hard time getting going from a stop) which seems about the same top speed of those bikes. It would be great if I could hit 35 or 40. Sorry I kinda went out on a tangent here, but I'd really like to get some understanding on the subject. Thanks for all your help!
 
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Old 01-13-05, 03:52 AM
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You should be OK with the rubber mounts on your engine. Just make sure they are all there and their bolts/nuts are tightened (sometimes they tend to vibrate and fall out after a lot of use).

I think most store bought go carts don't use torque converters because of the expense. Generally the cheapest way to get more performance is simply a larger engine. The go cart manufacturers simply use a 5hp motor instead of a 3hp to get the extra performance and the bigger engine often costs almost the same to manufacture.

I'm not sure why racing karts don't use constantly variable belt transmissions. I think that many years ago when it all got started they used a centrifugal clutch, it caught on and was written into the rule book. Also, the karts race just fine without it. Almost all the racing engines have top end rpm's about double what your engine runs, so they have a much greater speed range. There are also shifter classes of kart racing that have gearboxes and clutches, but most of them race two stroke engines.

My golf cart has a larger version of what you are going to put on your go cart and it works great. It gives plenty of torque for climbing hills with several people on board and still gives a good top speed, all while letting the engine operate in a normal rpm range (less than 3'800) for long life.
 
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Old 01-14-05, 05:21 PM
Biased-Ply
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Well I guess I'll upgrade to a 5hp briggs and buy one of those mod kits with new cam and valve springs, But that will be awhile from now. I'll just get that torque converter as soon as possible. Thanks for being so helpful and quick to reply. No more questions for now.

Thanks,
Biased-Ply
 
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