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starter repair advice needed


rbig's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 310
FL

04-01-05, 05:38 AM   #1  
starter repair advice needed

I'm writing to those of you in the group who have specific knowledge of starter rebuilding, with the hopes that you will give some tips and pointers to the rest of us.

From time to time, I read accounts of guys who repair their own starters. At first blush, this struck me as being one of those "over my head" type things. However, the more I've thought about it, the more I'm thinking "hey---maybe I can do this".

It's been said that brush failures are one of the most common items that we'll encounter. With that in mind, it seems like it would be prudent to simply replace all the brushes, whether determined bad or not (brushes are relatively cheap items). That way you start 'em all off with the same life expectancy. This part I can probably handle. What I need help on is where to find replacement brushes, and how do you do that? Do I take the ones in the starter and go around to wherever it is that they sell brushes and simply match 'em up by sight? Or is this something you get p/ns on from the parts breakdown list for the starter (if such a breakdown is even available for your unit), and then go to someplace like NAPA and get the brushes by p/n? How does this part of the process work? In all my traipsing around, I haven't run across any kinds of stores that have selections of carbon brushes for sale. So, are electric motor shops a possible source for brushes? Where else? Will they have a good enough variety of brushes that I can probably find replacements for the ones in my starter unit?

I assume any bearings, bushings, etc are standard, off-the-shelf items that can be found at places like Motion Industries, etc. So probably more of us know how to take care of that part of a starter overhaul than the brushes thing.

Now, this leaves the windings/armature, stator, whatever. What do we look for, test, or otherwise need to check with these, and how do we do that?

Last but not least: what else is there to consider, check for, etc, and how do we do it? Anything we need to know here?

 
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cheese's Avatar
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04-02-05, 02:42 AM   #2  
Hello rbig!

Starters aren't hard to build. What is the reason you want to build it? (what's it doing specifically). What kind of engine is this starter coming off of? Is there a name of any sort on the starter? The answers to these questions will help us give you details that pertain to your specific starter.

In general, you remove the starter case bolts, pull the starter apart (unless there is a solenoid attatched, then you would also remove the solenoid from the starter and unhook the bendix engagement fork). Remove the brush assembly and clean it out. Replace brushes as needed. Inspect the armature (the center rotating part with the wires wrapped around it) for damage. Inspect the commutator (the copper plates that the brushes contact on the armature). Lightly sand the commutator with 180 or 220 sandpaper, clean out the grooves between each copper contact with a razor blade, and blow it out well. Inspect the bushings or bearings. Replace or grease as needed. Be sparing on the grease (I like white lithium grease on starter bushings). You don't want so much on it that it slings out into the brushes. Inspect drive gear and bendix, lube or replace as needed. Reassemble.

If there is an electrical short in the starter, you'll need to use an ohmmeter to check the armature and field windings. Most small engine starters do not have field windings, just magnets for the field. If there are magnets, make sure they are not cracked.

Anything you need should be available at a starter rebuild shop, or an electric motor shop. Most small engine shops carry starter parts.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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11-13-05, 03:28 AM   #3  
aingworth
Kohler MV16S Starter Motor Rotates the Wrong Way

I have a Cub Cadet 1420 that was starting and running fine until about one month ago. After checking through the electrical system beginning with the battery I ended with the Starter Motor. The Starter Motor should rotate CW in order to extend its teeth and engage, but it is now rotating CCW. I verfied this by removing the starter motor from the tractor and powering it with a 12V battery and sure enough it rotates CCW. The other thing that bothers me is that I see that most Kohler starter motors I have looked at rotate CCW. What would cause a CW Starter Motor to suddenly rotate CCW?
Thanks
Brian

 
cheese's Avatar
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11-14-05, 12:37 AM   #4  
If it is connected in reverse polarity, it will change rotation. If the field is upside down, it will also cause this.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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11-15-05, 10:59 AM   #5  
aingworth
Thanks for the Help with My Starter

Oh Well, We learn something new every day. All I needed to do was lubricate my Kohler MV16S Starter Motor gears and it works fine. At least now I understand CCW versus CW rotation.
Thanks
Brian

 
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