Bet you haven't seen a piston this big

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Old 04-08-05, 08:51 PM
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Bet you haven't seen a piston this big

I know that the 'small engine' forum isn't the place for a picture like this, but I'll bet you haven't seen a piston from a two cycle diesel engine this big in a while.

<img src="http://ronj48.home.mchsi.com/PrezPolk.jpg"
 
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Old 04-09-05, 12:29 AM
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Wow! Must be on a ship. ??

Regardless, you won't be carrying the ring compressor around in your back pocket I guess.
 
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Old 04-09-05, 05:37 AM
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Yipes, I wonder what the displacement is on that monster!!!
 
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Old 04-09-05, 07:23 AM
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Yes, the engine was on a ship. It was on the American President Lines "President Polk". I was an officer on that ship for the last 3 months and got home just a little while ago. In answer to the question about the engine here are a few specs that I have.

Engine bore 84 centimeters about 33 inches
stroke 240 centimeters about 94.5 inches
That works out to about 81,160 cubic inches displacement per cylinder and that particular engine has 12 cylinders. The red line speed is 95 rpm, the engine is directly connected to the prop with no gear box. In order to go in reverse the engine is stopped, then started in the other direction. Yes, the engine will run in both a clockwise, and counter clockwise direction using two different lobs on the cam shaft. It's a two cycle, turbo charged, 55000 hp engine that's about 3 stories tall and about 100 feet long. The engine runs on 'heavy fuel oil' that must be heated to be pumped, and burns about $50,000 worth of fuel every day. It's one big engine, but moves a ship that's 902 foot long through the water at about 25 miles per hour. We went from Los Angles to several points in mainland China and back in 42 days with about 2500 40 foot shipping containers on board.
 
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Old 04-09-05, 07:32 AM
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Take a look at the two tubes that are running parallel to the piston connection rod. Those tubes are for the piston cooling water supply and return. Each piston is supplied with cooling water that run through channels inside the piston. The tubes have sliding seals so that as the piston goes up and down the water doesn't leak from the sliding joints. You can't see it, but the connecting rod is about 15 feet long and extends through a hatch in the deck down to the next engine level. I actually climbed inside of the crank case below the piston. There's enough room inside of there to park a small car it you didn't have to run the engine. It's very dangerous because everything is coated with oil and is very slippery. You know that the engine is big when you see ladder rungs welded into the sides of the crankcase and you actually need them to climb around inside.
 
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