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Pressure Washer isn't Producing Pressure


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04-09-05, 03:57 PM   #1  
maddogskip
Pressure Washer isn't Producing Pressure

Hi guys,

Looking for a little help on diagnosing and fixing my power washer. It has been about 5 years since I have run it and I'm afraid that I may have frozen up part of the water pump. I don't know how bad it is but am assuming the worst. I love to fix things (I rebuild cars for fun) so I figured what the heck, let's give this bad boy a shot before taking it down to the local repair shop.

Here is what is happening...

The motor starts up and runs beautifully
Water flow's through the hose just fine with motor off and on.
When the motor is running and I pull the trigger for power, I get a quick burst of reduced power and then just regular hose pressure . When I let off on the trigger, the motor boggs down like it is building pressure and then the same thing happens when I pull the trigger again .

Any tips would be greatly appreciated

-Dog Out...

 
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04-09-05, 08:16 PM   #2  
Don't know much about the inner workings, but I doubt letting it freeze helped it. I store mine in the basement in the winter months. One thing to check is make sure the strainer where the garden hose attaches is clean.
Mike

 
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04-11-05, 01:43 AM   #3  
Check the unloader valve. Sounds like it is sticking. The pump is probably working fine since you get a short burst. The unloader is just not taking the pump out of bypass mode. It is usually a brass vlave screwed into the pump somewhere near the pressure line.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

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04-12-05, 05:06 PM   #4  
maddogskip
Posted By: mla2ofus Don't know much about the inner workings, but I doubt letting it freeze helped it. I store mine in the basement in the winter months. One thing to check is make sure the strainer where the garden hose attaches is clean.
Mike
Hehe, I doubt that is the trouble. We don't get much freezing here in San Diego.

 
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04-12-05, 05:08 PM   #5  
maddogskip
Posted By: cheese Check the unloader valve. Sounds like it is sticking. The pump is probably working fine since you get a short burst. The unloader is just not taking the pump out of bypass mode. It is usually a brass vlave screwed into the pump somewhere near the pressure line.
Can you give me a bit more on the description of the unloader valve? Is there a picture I can review on line or can I zip you a picture of my pump so you can point it out?

Thank you...

 
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04-12-05, 06:00 PM   #6  
Post the make and model of your unit and a link if you can find it.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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04-12-05, 06:17 PM   #7  
maddogskip
Posted By: GregH Post the make and model of your unit and a link if you can find it.
EX-Cell EXWGV2121
6HP Briggs & Stratton
2100 PSI

This look to be exactly like mine.
http://64.224.48.196/partinfo/EXWGV2121.htm

Maybe this Parts list will help to quickly identify the part number.
http://www.devapawsc.com/repair_pdfs...ip/pk17374.pdf

Thanks.


Last edited by maddogskip; 04-12-05 at 06:28 PM.
 
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04-12-05, 06:29 PM   #8  
Try this link.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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04-13-05, 12:31 AM   #9  
In the parts diagram you linked to, the unloader is all parts marked 4,7. They show repair parts there for the unloader as well.


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04-13-05, 08:57 AM   #10  
maddogskip
Posted By: cheese In the parts diagram you linked to, the unloader is all parts marked 4,7. They show repair parts there for the unloader as well.
So should I just disassemble and check for stuck parts or will there be visible issues when pulling this assembley apart? Should I be aware of sealers, etc that will need to be replaced as a result of opening this assembley?

Thanks again for all of your help.

 
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04-13-05, 09:01 AM   #11  
maddogskip
FYI for any other readers (tips to take care of your Power Washer)

Source for this article and credit go to this URL
http://www.themowerman.com/article.htm

PRESSURE WASHER FUNDAMENTALS
(SELECTION, SET-UP, USE, MAINTENANCE, AND STORAGE)

By Chris Suser

In this article, we will explore how to select the right pressure washer, prepare it for use, operate it properly, maintain it's condition, and store it over the winter. Our objectives will be to reduce the confusion attendant to your purchase (since there are so many different models and sizes to choose from) and to help you avoid or at least reduce costly repairs and generally get the longest possible life out of your investment.

The past few years have seen an explosion in the sale and use of consumer oriented (as opposed to commercial) pressure washers. Prices have dropped substantially, to the point where washers are not only affordable but are rapidly becoming a homeowner “must-have” tool for such tasks as cleaning your house’s exterior, your decks and patios; your cars and RV’s, etc.

First, lets consider some simple rules for choosing the right pressure washer to meet your needs. In most home improvement centers, there are usually three types of washers. The first are the 1,500 to 2,000 PSI models. These are the least expensive and intended for light use only, such as on small houses, decks, cars, and the like requiring no more than an hour per use. The second type are the 2,250 to 2,700 PSI models which are designed to handle larger houses, decks, concrete walkways and even pools and that generally last longer. Last are the 3,000 to 3,500 PSI models; these are designed for heavy duty and prolonged use and will provide longer life and increased dependability. These are suitable for tackling jobs generally considered commercial in nature, such as graffiti removal, paint stripping, as well as the cleaning of dumpsters, parking lots, and store entranceways. As a caution, I would advise that you purchase a belt driven model if you intend to use the washer commercially.

Once you’ve purchased your pressure washer, your immediate area of interest will be getting it ready for use and started. First of all, make sure you have filled the engine with the proper oil and new, fresh gasoline treated with gas stabilizer. Then, lay out a good quality hose at least 5/8” in diameter and free of cuts, tears, and debris that could get into the pump and cause damage. Attach the pressure hose to a pump outlet, lay the hoses out until they are free of kinks and turn the water on full force. At this point, spray water out of the trigger gun until you no longer hear any pops. This last step, which will prime the pump and purge air from the system, ‘and is crucial for proper operation. To start your washer, first make sure it’s on flat and solid ground and that no leaks are apparent (or that you tighten all connections to stop any leaks found). Then pull the trigger on the gun (after making certain no one is in its path), which keeps pressure from building and makes the starting process easier.

Your pressure washer will deliver different spray patterns for different jobs, as indicated below. (Note that these patterns are numbered to indicate spray fan in degrees on instruments with quick-connect nozzles):

00 degrees — a blasting nozzle that delivers a highly concentrated stream suitable for such tasks as removing weeds from sidewalk cracks; stubborn stains from concrete, masonry, aluminum and steel, and caked mud from equipment and for cleaning lawnmower and tractor undersides. (Note: Be careful at this setting to avoid gouging wood or damaging fragile surfaces).
15 degrees — a chiseling nozzle that is suitable for cleaning gutters and downspouts or as a scraper to remove paint, grease, dirt, mildew, stains, and paint chips or otherwise prepare surfaces for painting or refinishing. Be sure to direct the nozzle at a 45-degree angle to the surface upon which you are working.

25 degrees — a flushing nozzle suited for wet-sweeping leaves from walks, curbs, and driveways; cleaning stable floors and swimming pool bottoms, degreasing engines and comparable jobs involving the flushing of dirt, mud, and grime.
40 degrees — a wash nozzle, with a wide spray pattern suitable for moderate cleaning jobs such as washing aluminum siding, windows and automobiles; spraying sidewalks, driveways, and patios; cleaning roofs, etc.


Since your pressure washer is able to deliver a variety of spray patterns, you can do many cleaning jobs without using detergents. When detergents are used, you should take a few precautionary steps to get the most out of them:

First make certain you have on the proper attire necessary to protect your eyes, ears, and skin.

Prepare the solution according to label directions.

Immerse the chemical hose/strainer into the solution to allow the detergent to siphon.

Adjust the trigger gun/wand to low-pressure mode by inserting the low-pressure nozzle securely into the end of the wand or for adjustable wands, pulling back on the variable nozzle.

You are then ready to start spraying, which should be done from the bottom to the top of the surface to avoid streaking.

Do not allow the detergent to remain on the surface for very long

Use the 40 degree nozzle to rinse, taking about 30 seconds to first purge the detergent from the line, and work from the top down, contrary to the washing process.

When you are finished, be sure to put the detergent hose in regular water and run about a gallon of water through to cleanse the hose and system and keep them free from contamination.

To keep your pressure washer operating at peak efficiency, you should follow the basic maintenance guidelines listed below:

Never allow the washer to operate without the incoming water hose attached, the in-line water filter installed and the water supply turned on full force.

Do not operate the washer in the bypass mode (i.e., with the trigger closed) for more than 2 minutes without triggering the gun. Failure to follow this simple rule can cause premature failure of the pump packing seals, resulting in costly pump repairs.

Never spray water directly on the pressure washer.

Because of the unknown and potentially harmful characteristics of detergents, you should use only those that are approved/specifically designed for your unit

Operate your unit only in well-ventilated areas free of oil or gas leaks. For indoor use, an electric washer will be needed.

Never turn off the water when your unit is running. Turn off the engine first, then the unit itself, and make sure to drain all water from the hose and gun before putting it away.

Be particularly careful when you are using the straight narrow stream. It is not recom*mended for use on painted or wood surfaces or on items with adhesive backings. Also, NEVER point the stream at a person or animal, as serious injuries could result.

Make sure to keep all hoses away from the muffler to prevent burning or even bursting.

Do not store the unit outside, where it is can be exposed to rain, dirt, or other adverse weather conditions nor in a location where it is subject to freezing temperatures. The latter can cause the pump to lock-up (freeze). If this should happen, however, let the pump thaw naturally in a warm environment and do not attempt to hasten this process by pouring hot water on the pump.

If you plan to store the washer for 30 or more days or over the winter, either run the engine until the gas is gone or stabilize the fuel and run it through the fuel system and carburetor. After this, attach one end of a 4 or 5 foot section of hose to the pump inlet and the other into an antifreeze solution and yank the pull cord until the anti-freeze comes out of the pump outlet. As indicated in the previous step, store the unit in a garage, basement, or other area where it will be protected from freezing temperatures.

The advice in this article is not meant as a replacement for your owners manual, as these manuals are tailored to the unique qualities of your specific pressure washer. Hopefully though, it will provide you with some useful information on selecting the right washer, preparing it for use and maintaining and storing it. If I can answer any additional questions you may have or otherwise be of any further assistance, please give me a call at 1 866 255 0219 (toll free). If you've done all you can to maintain your pressure washer and it still doesn't seem to be working at peak conditions, it may be time to consider replacing some of it's essential components. The parts that generally experience the most wear and tear are the hoses, wands, guns, and nozzles. You can find these items in our online storefront (for late model Ex-Cell units) by selecting the Get Parts link. If you have misplaced your owners manual, you may want to consider replacing it as well. We would also like to remind our new customers that the online storefront only brushes the surface of our vast catalogue of replacement parts. The Partners Page further details all the manufacturers that we supply authorized parts and service for. Please call to place your order on these brands as we continue to web-enable our inventory over the coming months.

About the Author: Chris Suser is the owner of The Mowerman, Inc., which is based in Laurel, Maryland~ ~ has been in business over 10 years, repairing all types of power equipment and dispensing maintenance and basic repair advice to customers. The Mowerman does much of the small engine repair work and provides staff product knowledge courses for the local Home Depots, and has been the subject of articles in the Washington Post and Baltimore Sun newspapers and the Washingtonian magazine. Chris graduated from the University of Maryland in 1989 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology

 
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04-14-05, 01:04 AM   #12  
Yep, just take it apart and start looking. You'll probably know what the problem is when you see it, even if it's just a bunch of calcium buildup or rust. You might need to replace an o ring or two, or maybe not. You won't know 'till you get it apart. An automotive parts store might have the needed o rings if so.


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04-16-05, 03:16 PM   #13  
maddogskip
Well, I took it apart all the way to the pistons for the pump and found no damage. Just average calcium build up which I tried my best to delicately scrape out. I then put it back together (which was not as bad as I thought it might be) and fired her up and still get the same pressure results.

The Detergent Injector looked fine too.

Also, when I had her open I pulled the start cord (with the motor in the off position) and noted that all three pistons where moving up and down just fine.

Another thing I didn't do which I probably should have was to check the Unloader Check Valve which is indicated by the 3,7 on the parts list.

http://www.devapawsc.com/repair_pdf...aip/pk17374.pdf

I'm going to pull her apart again and check this out to make sure the spring and such are not stuck.

More to come.

 
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04-16-05, 03:48 PM   #14  
maddogskip
I'm getting better at this now. I got it apart again and rigged a tool out of a bent nail tip (90 degrees) to get that injector out and it looks Ok. There was a slight bit of rust and some calcium but the spring and o-ring seemed fine.

Now I am at a loss?

I will probably purchase the kits to tune this pump's seals up but am hesitant to do so if it still won't work.

Any other ideas?

 
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01-28-09, 06:01 PM   #15  
Hey, anything new on this??? I have the same problem with the same model. I'm assuming it is the pump itself.

Do you need to replace the whole pump or is that seal kit sufficient??

Thanks

 
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04-18-09, 10:03 AM   #16  
pw

same thing happen to me............turns out the wand was bad make sure to check it first before you buy the kit !!Beer 4U2

 
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05-18-09, 05:04 AM   #17  
Posted By: dferg476 Hey, anything new on this??? I have the same problem with the same model. I'm assuming it is the pump itself.

Do you need to replace the whole pump or is that seal kit sufficient??

Thanks
Don't know if you ever fixed this, but there are a few things that cause this. The first one is the unloader valve. It can be taken out by removing a u shaped keeper and pulling the whole assembly out. (see parts breakdown) The holes coming into it should be clean, and all o-rings good. You should be careful not to disturb the setting of this if you don't have to, as this is what sets the high pressure fotr the machine. If it is set wrong, it can cause problems, like the washer stalling out. There are also some check valves in the mainfold (FA-YK157116600 ) and this can be taken off (4 allen screws) and each valve and their corresponding o-ring checked.

The second one is that there are check valves inside the pump itself. You can get to these by taking the 5 allen screws off of the bottom of the pump. Be careful, as there are several o rings in the bottom of the pump. After you take this off, you should pull the start rope (slowly, do not let the machine start) and observe the 3 pistons, they should all move up and down. The check valves are the 3 small holes that have an o-ring where they meet the pump, to the left of the pistons on the drawing. they each have a shiny seat that must not be clogged open. I would push each down to make sure each is seated and free, easily, as they do not take much to open, maybe use a q-tip .

You should find your problem in one of the above. If the pistons are moving, the unit is pumping. The unit just has several checks and bypasses that regulate pressure, and they must all be working correctly.

 
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09-08-14, 05:40 PM   #18  
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The unloader valve was stuck on mine,
this one has a clip holding it in
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I cleaned it up and sprayed it and the cavity with lithium grease
works great now

 
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