Tool for Zama on a new Leaf Blower

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  #1  
Old 04-29-05, 02:42 PM
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Tool for Zama on a new Leaf Blower

Hello all & Cheese! I'm still batting 100% as I am learning; mostly because you all have an answer when I get stuck. I'm working on a new and a nearly new pair of Craftsman leaf blowers and I've never had this much trouble. 2 Questions: 1) One of the Zama carbs has what I assume is a new type housing that the High & Low adjustment valves sit recessed in. Is there a special tool or am I missing something here? I can't find anything to adjust them with. I took tubing and fit it on one but the valves would not turn? 2) I put a good carb on the other identical leaf blower and I can't get it started either? This carb I can adjust. I've gone by the book! I have spark. The exhaust is open. The fuel mix is correct. I've tried it with and without the air filter? I still can't get it to even pop??? All help appreciated! A quick "Thank You" Cheese for the advice on the Honda water cooled rider. We put the new belt on, set the timing per your instructions and she fired on the first try. You wouldn't believe how loud it fired and the stuff that boiled out. Running great now so Thx again, Ron
 
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Old 04-29-05, 10:25 PM
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Hi Ron!

Glad I could help with the Honda! I guess he finally did decide to fix it after all!

On the blower that won't start, will it if you squirt a shot of fuel into the carb or spark plug hole?

I believe there is a tool for the adjustment screws you mentioned, but I haven't found one yet. I haven't tried it yet, but I think the choke lever from an older homelite blower or some of their trimmers would fit the splined screws. The screws are basically not supposed to be adjusted. EPA is getting more and more persistent. The carb should run with the screws fixed in their current position unless they need to be removed for cleaning. That's the theory anyway.
 
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Old 04-29-05, 11:58 PM
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Thx, Cheese

The fellow found a belt for $30, paid for it himself, and got it fixed. I am thankful he called me to share the good news...We're talking often, again.
Thx again for the help!

On the blower I appreciate the Homelite tip I will try it today. This guy has 2 brand new carbs that are just not set correctly but he's waited untill the warrenty period has run??? I can't handle heavy stuff anymore so I bought one of the featherlite blowers about 3 months ago. After I sent my note with this question I decided to clean it up and adjust it as it has started running so lean that I was afraid it would either blow up or seize! Well it has the very same "Non-adjustable" needles!!! I have to run it at 1/2 throttle. I just finished my first 4 cycle string trimmer, ya'll helped me with it, and I had to remove those old California restrictor sleeves to be able to ajust it and get it started.

Yes I tried the carb cleaner through the exhaust port and then the plug hole. Nothing, no even a fliker? I hate to do it but I guess I'll have to take it completely apart and be sure the flywheel gap is set correctly. If it aint that and it aint the carb I believe I'll just go back to large carb devices...ONLY! HA. As always "Thank you very much", Ron
 
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Old 04-30-05, 07:54 PM
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Quote : "If it aint that and it aint the carb I believe I'll just go back to large carb devices...ONLY! HA."

I feel like doing that too sometimes. I don't mind the echos, stihls, husq's and good stuff, but the lower end stuff is just made so cheap that it makes it hard to diagnose and even harder to justify spending much time on it. I mean, if you can buy a brand new one for $60.00, then it's not worth spending an hour on a broken worn out one. The throw-together design just lends itself to unordinary problems too, like loose cylinders, air leaks in the crankcase, loose tolerances, un-symmetrical parts, etc...

It also makes them more time consuming and even a potential for a loss, because you might get one that won't start (for instance). You check and see that it needs fuel lines. Ok, not bad. It's probably worth 10 or 15 minutes to put new lines on it right? So you do. But, it won't start still. Ok, now you've tested and determined the carb is clogged. So you pull it and clean it. Now it starts, but won't rev when it warms up. So you worry with adjustments awhile, maybe tear the carb down again, but after awhile you discover the plastic crankcase cover is warming up and distorting, causing an air leak. So, now you have so much time invested that you figure you might as well change the crankcase cover and/or gasket just so you can get something out of the job (cause you know you can't charge 3 hours on a $60 trimmer). So you get it running fine, go out and test it and the head siezes up. etc..etc...etc... Sometimes you just gotta quit before you wind up spending half a day on it. I'm not suggesting that's what you do in this case though.

The scenario is not so uncommon. I know you are in a different situation though, since you are not trying to make a living doing this like I am.

Have you looked inside the cylinder of these blowers? Sounds like you might not have enough compression. Look for scratches on the piston, rings, and cylinder walls. Also look at the top ring and the piston between the top ring and top of the piston. If it's black and brown and chalky looking, it's probably toast.
 
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Old 05-01-05, 12:10 AM
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You are correct...'O' great one!

I was thinking how I could determine compression on this thing when I got your post! The truth is I was finished working on it because I had nearly 2 hours in it with no luck! I went back and looked; The piston is brown as well as the wall. It just looks like it was burned. Your review of time vs. cost and what will be billable is a tough one, Plus your reputation is all important! You want to fix it but it is just impractical? Well as always I greatly appreciate the excellent information and 'Advice'! Thx, Ron.
 
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Old 05-01-05, 09:35 PM
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Oh well, another for the junk pile . Better luck next time!!!???
 
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Old 05-01-05, 11:17 PM
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A final "Thank You", on this one! I'm QSY to the shack WB4LIJ, Ron
 
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Old 05-02-05, 08:00 PM
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You're welcome!
 
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