Gas or Electric Mower

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  #1  
Old 06-01-05, 01:41 PM
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Gas or Electric Mower

Greetings all ! I am tired of working on my Craftman 6.0 HP mower. It was great 2 years ago when I purchased it. I always did the routing maintenance, filters, oil, plug even a new( used) coil. Now I find myself working more on keeping the mower running or trying to start than actuall cutting grass. I am considering an electric mower since my total cutting area is only is about 550 sq ft. The configuration of the yard would never have me more than 60ft from an outlet. Any ideas on a decent electric mower. I have never used one before but i think I am ready to now. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!
 

Last edited by Bob53; 06-01-05 at 02:08 PM.
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  #2  
Old 06-01-05, 02:07 PM
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follow up to question

It is a Sears model no. 917.388021
My frustration with this 6 hp engine lies in the fact that it starts real strong for 5 seconds and shuts right down. I replaced the coil with a used one from the small engine repair shop. Could i still not be getting spark? What is the best way to check? If it starts for 5 seconds does that mean that I am getting the spark? I removed the bowl from the carb and it was still like new. I replaced it without squashing the gasket or anything. New plug, new oil (20 oz), new air filter.fresh fuel. the fuel filter is in the tank and the bowl fills so I assume the fuel is passing the way it should. For 4 days I have been taking it apart and putting it back together with the same results.
This is why I am considering the electric mower. Or is there something I am overlooking or something else you folks could possible recommend me to do with this gas mower. thank you. (Old & frustrated )
 
  #3  
Old 06-01-05, 08:07 PM
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Hello: Bob53

If, as you mentioned, "Any advice is appreciated" try this. Remove the fuel cap. Start and run the engine. If the engine runs fine and continues to run, the vent hole in the fuel cap is plugged. Replace the cap.

I'm sure the pros in this forum will have additional help. Check back on your questions several more times.

If you plan to purchase an electric mower, check the machines available from the two advertisers in the google ad, in this forum topic:

http://www.tylertool.com

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Discovered this mower, while surfing the net.
Cordless Electric Mower:
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Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice.
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  #4  
Old 06-02-05, 12:59 AM
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You didn't mention what engine you have, but I imagine it is a tecumseh. Remove the bowl screw and clean it out well. There are 4 tiny holes in it that, when clogged, will cause your problem. 2 oppose each other near the base of the screw, one runs through the center, and one tiny one is near the end in an unthreaded section of the screw. It can be hard to see, especially when clogged.
 
  #5  
Old 06-02-05, 05:55 AM
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Thank you both for the quick responses. I tried starting without the gas cap and still no luck. I proceeded to remove the screw from the bottom of the bowl. The 2 holes opposite each other I was clearly able to see daylite thru them. The tinyier hole that stands alone I was able to slide a sewing needle back & forth without obstruction. The center hole in the middle of the screw I was able to manipulate the needle up & down but the top of the screw head had a metal (rivet?) or something that prevented the needle from going completely thru the top. Is it possible that my used replacement coil is no good? Is there bench test method I can use? Sorry for being long winded but let me tell you what else I did this morning. I disconnected the safety control arm & attached mechanism on the engine that has the green wire going to the coil. I realize the safety of this important piece but I just wanted to eliminate it for the sake of getting the engine to run. Am I correct to assume that this green wire that connects to the coil is mainly to disconnect power via the control arm at the handle? Also, am I correct to assume that it is not needed just to get the engine to start? I realize that once I get it running again I will immediately replace the safety control arm. Thanks for the help. I look forward to your responses. Thanks so much. Bob.
 
  #6  
Old 06-03-05, 01:01 AM
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The green wire is the kill wire. You can disconnect it to eliminate problems in the kill circuit, but if you get it started, you won't be able to shut it off the standard way.

Sounds like the bowl screw is clean and ok.

You do have spark if it starts at all. It might be losing that spark for some reason, but it usually takes longer than 5 seconds for a coil to go from working to not. Do you have spark when it dies?

Try holding the primer button in with the engine running and see if it runs longer.
 
  #7  
Old 06-03-05, 05:38 AM
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Last evening when dark, I removed the spark plug, and with vice grips attached it to the housing shroud, then replaced the boot onto the plug. Each time I pulled the starter cord I was clearly able to see a rapid blue spark consisten with the entire length of each pull of the cord. I don't know if this is relevant or not.

Today I will reinstall the plug and attempt to start while my wife holds the priming bulb in. Let's hope for the best. I'll post back after trying. Thanks so much Cheese.
 
  #8  
Old 06-03-05, 07:01 AM
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Hi, I reinstalled the plug and made double sure of the gap while I had it out. I then proceeded to push the primer bulb 3 times and had my wife hold it in. Still no start. I hate to be a pain to you guys. If it is an internal engine problem then I will just decide to make a new purchase. Of course if their are any other DIY hints that you can give, I am surely greatful of any ideas you all may have. Thanks Again.
 
  #9  
Old 06-03-05, 08:52 AM
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Before, you said it would start, but only run for 5 seconds. Now it won't start at all?!? Here's my advice, hopefully it's worth at least what you paid for it...

1. Stop messing with the kill switch and put it back the way it's supposed to be.

2. Kill switch and coil are electrical components. Sounds like you have a good spark, so there is not a problem with electrical components. If it was starting, then it had to be getting a spark.

3. Since it was starting, but would die after a few seconds, it sounds like a fuel problem. The engine needs 3 things: fuel, compression, and spark. Sounds like it might be getting just enough fuel to start for a few seconds, but the flow isn't keeping up once the engine is running.

4. When you are at a point where it won't start at all, squirt some starting fluid (ether) into carb throat, then try starting. If it starts, runs for a few seconds and dies, then it is a fuel delivery problem.

5. With a jar or can and a rag handy, disconnect fuel hose from carb, and see if fuel freely flows out. If not, that's the problem. If it does, it is a carb problem.

Report back with findings...
 
  #10  
Old 06-03-05, 02:57 PM
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Halleluia it's working

It's up & running thanks to all the inspiration and advice from all you DIY's. I made a major blunder back on the first day
Each year as part of the annual maintenance of course I change the oil....well...it takes 20 oz of #30 oil. So, on the side of the quart of oil there is a numerical scale that goes from 2oz - 32oz. Instead of pouring in 20 oz's I left 20oz's in the quart container. So, i really only had 12oz of oil in the engine. What a goof I am. Today as I was determined to trace back every step of taking it from the shed, I knew that changing the oil was the first thing I did. I even had the remaining quart of oil in the shed. It seemed heavy for having (supposedly) already used 20 oz. When I looked at that plastic scale on the side of the oil bottle and saw 20oz left I kicked my self with my good leg. I added 8oz more of oil and it was like VAROOM on the very first pull. All you gentlemen inspired me to complete a DIY project instead of tossing out a good mower and buying a new one! Now, as soon as my wifes hip replacement heals, I will enjoy watching her mow the grass again (kidding) Thanks to you all it was a great learning experience.
 
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