Sears/AYP Tiller

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  #1  
Old 04-27-06, 09:46 AM
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Sears/AYP Tiller

I have just acquired an 8HP Sears front tyne tiller Model number
917.291580. It was originally made by American Yard Products (AYP). I am looking for an owners manual if anyone out there has one or knows where to get one. Sears does not have them available any more. If I can't get a manual then maybe someone can tell me what lubricant to use in the gear box. It has a lever operated transmission with H, L, and Reverse. The transmission seems sealed but with a drain plug in the upper portion that appears to be a water drain only. This tiller has sat for about 2 years, I got it going (Briggs Engine) but I think there is some water in the transmission. Would I need to worry about the water there? Is there a way to get rid of the water; heat? None came out of the upper drain plug. Any help would be appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-27-06, 11:22 AM
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Others will know specifically but if its fluid, its more then likely 80w-90 gear oil. A few oil changes on it, and probablly leaving the drain plug open should get rid of the water (if you drained a sludgy, kinda of creamy looking oil, it mixed with the water)
 
  #3  
Old 04-27-06, 01:29 PM
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Thanks for the feed back but I don't think it's gear oil as there is no way to drain it. The only plug is the upper one which I think, if it took gear oil, would be the level plug. I do suspect it is a grease that really doesn't need to be changed. But I would like to get rid of the water. My other thought was to put a grease nipple on the lower case and put new grease it from there, forcing out the old grease from the upper plug. But I would need the grease type. I would still prefer an owners manual or copies of one.
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-06, 10:04 AM
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Bob

I have this exact same tiller. They are a horse and run forever.

As for your problem:

There may not be a way to drain the oil out in terms of a drain plug. Since that type of oil isn't changed frequently the only way to drain it is to open the case. Still the likelihood is that the lubricant is 90 weight gear oil which is readily available in auto parts stores.

You would not want to do as you were thinking to put a grease zerk in the case and pressure feed paste grease into the gear case. That type of grease wouldn't flow into the case bearings and transmission gears to sufficiently lubricate them.

The water in the case is probably condensation. That type of case is usually vented. The grease and air inside the case expand with heat during use and when they cool and contract outside air and moisture is brought into the case. During regular use you wouldn't see an accumulation of any significance, but if the unit has sat for some time the moisture could accumulate.

One way of getting the water out would be to fill the case with diesel spiked with a half bottle of gasline antifreeze. Then run your tiller in high gear with no load on it for about one or two minutes. Remove the plug and lay the tiller on its side and allow the diesel to drain out completely through the plug you're talking about. This would provide a good flush for the gear case and get rid of the water.

Then set it upright, tilted away fro the plug opening. Overfill through the drain plug with 90 weight gear oil. The diesel residue will float on top of the heavier gear oil. Now level your tiller. With the plug out let the oil drain back down to the bottom of the plug hole. This will get rid of the diesel residue. Then till away !!

As far as a manual, I haven't been able to find one for mine.

Hope this helps.
 
  #5  
Old 05-07-06, 10:24 AM
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Thanks Bob for a fantastic post. I really appreciate your info. Maybe since you have the exact tiller you can help me with the oil burning that I posted about on another thread. The compression is 90 psi but it burns a tremendous amount of oil that coats the plug. It has been suggested that the oil ring is gone. I was hoping that maybe the oil ring was just cruded up and that I could flush the system to get the oil burning down. I have changed the oil twice now and used a little Marvel Mystery Oil in the crankcase. Is there hope beyond hope that maybe I could reduce the oil consumption without doing a ring job? As you say they are a horse and run forever. I can use it now but need to remove the plug and clean it after about 30 minutes as well as top up with oil.
 
  #6  
Old 05-07-06, 12:25 PM
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Bob

I'm afraid from what you are describing the oil is coming past a worn.oil ring. Typically there is one or two compression rings and the oil controll ring in the bottom groove. To isolate the problem to the rings, add a small amount of motor oil through the spark plug hole and recheck the compression. If it jumps up significantly, you know you're dealing with a ring problem.

There is such a thing as a stuck ring. Usually the ring is stuck in the ring groove in such a way as to prevent it from expanding well to the cylinder wall and doing its job of controlling the oil. It can be loosened back up with additives to the oil such as oil change flushes. This usually isn't the case, but it's a possibility.

Another thing to check would be the crankcase venting. If plugged, the compression blowby would pressurize the crankcase and force oil past the oil ring and result in the oil burning you're experiencing. Once again, a possibility, but usually not the case.

Probably, considering the age of the motor, you have a worn set of rings (all would be installed at the same time). In a worse case scenario, the cylinder could be worn out as well. I doubt if that engine could be bored to accept a larger piston, but I don't know that for sure.

If you are going to use it a lot, I would consider having engine work on it. If engine components are worn out, additives that "restore compression and controll oil burning" may get you through light useage, but that would be about it. Typically those just increase oil viscosity.

The good side is, if all you have is a worn set of rings, they can be replaced fairly quickly and not too expensively.

Hope this helps,

Later
 
  #7  
Old 05-07-06, 01:48 PM
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Absolutely no crankcase blow by. This thing sat at least 2 years without any use so maybe a small chance of oil ring stuckness. I will try a little more with oil changes and additive but after that it's 50wt oil. Thanks again.
 
  #8  
Old 05-07-06, 11:38 PM
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BTW: This should take "00" Grease. Gear oil is way too thin.
 
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