K301s Rebuild ???

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  #1  
Old 05-30-06, 03:38 PM
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K301s Rebuild ???

Rebuilt my first motor. Looks great. Seems to have good compression. Doesn't smoke. and starts on the first crank. So what's the problem...... I've got a knock!! I know for sure, that I didn't torque the rod correctly though. Now I've pulled the motor agian and torqued the rod cap to what I assume is the correct torque setting but it seems like it's just too darn loose to me. The instructions that came with the kit says it's supposed to be torqued to 160 inch pounds. Am I correct in saying this is equivelant to 13.3 foot pounds? If so, I have a little slop in the connection to the crank and I torqued it to 14 foot pounds which should be ok. Is this normal. I can't remember if I had any play in the connection before I started. Any suggestions out there? Thanks in advance.........ALAN
 
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Old 05-31-06, 01:33 AM
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Sounds like you need a new rod and possibly a crank. Did you mic the rod and crank to see if they were within specs?
 
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Old 05-31-06, 03:47 AM
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Rod knock.......

No, I didn't mic the crank because it wasn't knocking when the engine was pulled. However, the motor has been overhauled 2 other times and the crank was likely turned in the past. I still have the old rod that came out of it and this was my next attempt to solve the riddle. The one i bought is a standard because I couldn't determine what size the old one was. I couldn't look up the numbers on it to see what it was. If you have any idea, the numbers on the rod are: 47 059 07. I suspect it is .010 undersized. Can I safely remove and reinstall the piston without re-ringing so as to install the old connecting rod? Also, I did convert the inch pounds to foot pounds correctly didn't I? Thanks..........ALAN
 
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Old 05-31-06, 08:58 AM
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Just curious.......

Just curious, if the valves weren't set correctly, would that cause the rod to knock? I think their ok because there's no backfiring, or anything out of the ordinary for that matter, happening that would lead me to believe they weren't set correctly. Actually the motor runs better now than it ever has since I've acquired it. I'll replace the rod with the older one and see if this takes care of it. I just hope I don't break a piston ring in the process. We'll see.......

 
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Old 06-01-06, 01:16 AM
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You shouldn't break a ring just by removing the piston and reinstalling it...unless you didn't cut the ridge at the top of the cylinder. Did you? If not, this could be the source of the knocking and could also break a ring while the engine is running and ruin the engine. I don't have a kohler parts book handy, but there's a good chance the crank has been turned before. The old rod might even have .010 stamped on it somewhere.

You did the conversion correctly.
 
  #6  
Old 06-01-06, 02:57 AM
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Standard specs on the crankpin is 1.4995-1.5000". You need to mic the crankpin as well as the rod. If the crank is undersize and the rod you installed is standard, you will surely break the rod when you run the engine under a load. BTW, the bore should measure 3.3745-3.3755".
 
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Old 06-06-06, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by cheese
You shouldn't break a ring just by removing the piston and reinstalling it...unless you didn't cut the ridge at the top of the cylinder. Did you? If not, this could be the source of the knocking and could also break a ring while the engine is running and ruin the engine. I don't have a kohler parts book handy, but there's a good chance the crank has been turned before. The old rod might even have .010 stamped on it somewhere.

You did the conversion correctly.



I didn't think it would harm anything. Just needed a second opinion beforhand. Thanks. Also, there are no other numbers on the old rod, other than the part number. I think I'll give it a shot just to see if this might be the problem. Thanks again.....
 
  #8  
Old 06-06-06, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by puey61
Standard specs on the crankpin is 1.4995-1.5000". You need to mic the crankpin as well as the rod. If the crank is undersize and the rod you installed is standard, you will surely break the rod when you run the engine under a load. BTW, the bore should measure 3.3745-3.3755".


I'm pretty certain everything is within specs. I merely honed the cylinder and installed new valves, rings, piston, and rod as well as installed a complete tune-up kit. There was quite a bit of carbon build up on the head when I pulled it. This is likely due to the rings being worn out and the engine smoking like the dickens. I cleaned the carbon build-up from the head and I used a dingleberry hone to refresh the cylinder walls and everything looked fine. Although I didn't mic the cylinder bore (no tool in my arsenal. Recommendation?), the engine appears to be rather tight and has good compression. Should I still be concerned? What can I expect to happen if the cylinder bore is slightly out of spec? With proper maintanance, how long should I expect it to last?
 
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