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shed for generator


badeyeben's Avatar
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01-06-07, 02:17 PM   #1  
shed for generator

I would like to build a shed to put my generator (5000 watt) inside. Then run conduit to house. Then wire plugs at house and shed so I start generator,plug in cord at shed then sump pump and lights inside.
I have no idea how big this shed should be. Do I need 2 feet all around the generator, or more or less? I think I will need vents at the floor for intake air and some type vent near the top to vent heat and exhaust fumes. Would I need sheet metal on the floor ? I was just thinking it is usually nasty weather when I would need the generator and I couldn't run it in the rain. Any thuoghts as to how to build this shed?

 
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GregH's Avatar
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01-06-07, 08:36 PM   #2  
Portable generators are not meant to be operated indoors.
The best method of protecting them is just with a roof to keep the elements off and the sides open all around to vent the exhaust and heat.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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01-07-07, 04:40 AM   #3  
If you completely enclose it, you will need more than vents, you will need forced air. A small attic fan works great for this.

I'd allow at least 1' on all sides except the exhaust, which you should allow at least 2'.

You'll also need doors and a lifting roof, in order to put gas in it (unless it's LP/NG). Otherwise you will have to disconnect everything, roll it out, gas it up, roll it back in, reconnect, etc.

Built and insulated, a small generator hut can do wonders for cutting down the amount of noise while keeping the unit 'at the ready' when it's needed, rather than stuffed in a corner of the garage.

I'll post up some early photos of the shed I made for mine later today.

 
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01-07-07, 01:10 PM   #4  
I realize that they were not meant to operate inside. But realistically just a roof over it is not enough when it is raining or ice or snow. I know we had concrete block buildings for them when we used them in construction and that would be ideal but a little late to build one this winter. They were about 2 foot bigger than the generator on all sides, but tall enough to stand in to service them. We had an extension on the exhaust, but no venting, but left the door open when in use, unless the rain came from that direction. Seemed it got quite warm in there but I don't think any wood would have caught fire.
I was thinking along the lines of the outhouse style shed.

 
30yearTech's Avatar
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01-07-07, 04:54 PM   #5  
From Briggs and Stratton FAQ

"You may build a shelter for your generator provided you leave adequate room for air circulation. Your generator has an air cooled engine. AIR is the ONLY source of coolant. We recommend a shelter with a minimum of three feet of clearance on all sides of the generator. Two sides of the shelter must be open for air circulation. One side must be the engine exhaust side."

The above information is taken directly from the Briggs and Stratton website concerning enclosures for their generators.

 
badeyeben's Avatar
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01-08-07, 07:14 AM   #6  
30 year tech where did you find that info? i googled briggs and all I found was how to use the shipping carton (box) as a temporary shelter! it said to cut off flaps, cut holes for exhaust and plugs, then start engine put on box and plug in cords. It said keep exhaust 2 feet away from combustable material. Remove box as soon as inclimate weather stopped. Now how is that for a shelter!

 
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01-08-07, 09:03 AM   #7  
http://www.pen411.com/diy/genhut.htm

 
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