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Billy Goat Blower with 10 HP Intek


Bigwind's Avatar
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01-14-07, 02:06 AM   #1  
Billy Goat Blower with 10 HP Intek

Hello all & Cheese: A fellow who is in the commercial lawn & Landscaping business wants me to look at his 'TWO', 3-4 year old Billy Goat blowers. Seems the shop he's been using to repair them ALWAYS says the problem with these units are 'Push Rod' related. They can't believe this would be the issue three times in a row and with 'Both Units' so they have asked me to repair them. My question, at this very very early stage of the process, is simply this: Is this, push rods, a problem you guy's see in your businesses with Intek 10 hp engines fairly frequently? If NOT are there any other systemic issues with these engines I should be aware of? In three years of working with small engines, oddly, these are the first Intek's I will have the pleasure of repairing? As always, thanks for everybody's help, Ron

 
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01-14-07, 12:33 PM   #2  
Personally, I am not aware of any specific issues with the Intek engine, including "push rods". Is there a specific problem or are they in for routine service?

 
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01-14-07, 03:24 PM   #3  
The owner just said they won't start and started telling me about the push rod issue? I'm going to do my normal check on both and then I'll post back with specific details as I really should have... to begin with. Sorry! I was just wondering if anybody knew of any systemic problems with the Intek engines in general and the Intek 10 horse specifically? Many Thanks, Ron

 
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01-14-07, 04:19 PM   #4  
I have heard about valve adjustment issues with this engines.

 
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01-15-07, 12:27 AM   #5  
Hi Ron!

I don't know of any specific problems with the push rods on these. I wonder what the actual "problem" is. If the pushrods are bending, there is probably an underlying problem. If the valves are just needing adjustment, that is common, and valve adjustment should be done yearly...maybe more since the units are used commercially.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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01-21-07, 06:25 PM   #6  
Compression is 55 lbs.

I don't have the equipment to do a leak-down test. I intend to buy it as soon as I can. I did a standard compression test and got 55 lbs on the first pull and a total of 65 on the second. Broke a rib on the next pull so I guess twice is enough? Is it? In general terms what is the acceptable parameters for this Intek. For several reasons I'm having trouble remembering the general rule of thumb minimum pressure required for most 4 cycles. Guess I've been messing with 2 cycles to long!

If 55 lbs is too low what things should I rule out other than piston, rings and cylinder? I am going to pressurize the unit as best as possible and check for obvious cranks and leaks around the head. After that all I can think of is to check the valves guessing that the exhaust valve could be stuck or leaking and in need of re-seating? What should the tappet clearance be .003 - .006 and do I check it when both are open/loose at the same time?

I would really appreciate receiving the best sequence to do things in as well?

As always "Thanks for the help", Ron

 
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01-21-07, 10:58 PM   #7  
You generally would want to see at least 90 psi on any engine as far as compression goes, but small engines, the way they're built, don't lend themselves to a standard compression test. It sounds as though yours might have sufficient compression but a leakdown test would be better. I have done leakdown tests with nothing other than a breaker bar holding the shaft from turning, and a rubber-tipped blower pressurizing the cylinder. You don't get to read any guage this way, but you can listen for the air escaping, where it's escaping from, and how fast it's escaping. Note that it is normal for some air to escape. I would put turn the engine to the first 1/4 of the compression stroke, hold it there (not by hand, even with a breaker bar...it can hurt you. Position the bar so that it's against something immobile and wedge it there firmly and securely...and then double check it. You don't want it to move.) and then pressurize the cylinder. Listen for air coming out the carb (have the filter and cover off), listen for air from the muffler, and open the oil cap and listen for air coming from the crankcase. You should have no sign of air from either the muffler or carb. A little coming from the crankcase is ok. A lot is not. If you get a borderline amount, it might be time to do a conventional leakdown test with proper equipment.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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