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Trouble with an Ancient Ariens


Sno-Man's Avatar
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Join Date: Feb 2007
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02-06-07, 01:27 PM   #1  
Trouble with an Ancient Ariens

I have a problem similar to another post: my old Ariens with a Tecumseh engine used to throw the snow pretty well, but last year the throwing power diminished significantly when the snoblower is under a load and digging in to the snow. "Torque" drop significantly even with a very light load, and I have to ramp up the throttle to get it to throw snow at all. It used to throw a good 10-15 feet; now 5-8 is the max.

The engine always starts right up, and runs well after I adjust the choke. I've changed the plug and oil. Suggestions posted to a similar problem suggested fuel flow and clearing the gas cap. Could anyone suggest what they think is the culprit and how to fix?
Thanks,
-Sno-Man

 
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puey61's Avatar
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02-07-07, 03:10 AM   #2  
It may or may not be any one problem. You mentioned it was "ancient" and with such age comes wear. You'll want to check all the required needs for any indication of attention: Compression; Ignition; and carburetion. Of course, there are other areas to check but the main, aforementioned, areas are always the first to check. Other areas are governor response, excessive peripheral load, belt wear, throttle wear, just to name a few. The first test I'd perform if it were in my shop is to do a leak-down test and determine if the combustion chamber is up to specs. And then do an in-line ignition test to see if the ignition has sufficient strength. And finally, disassemble and inspect the carburetor for varnish/trash accumulation.

 
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02-07-07, 02:46 PM   #3  
thanks

Thanks for your reply. When I say "ancient" I mean absolutely saved from the scrap heap. I bought this snow blower for $50 and they had put a very "old" new engine on it. The casing over the fins at the top of the engine is rusting off, and they used sheet metal to replace the missing bottom of the machine beneath the belt.

I've managed not to put any more money in it after 3, and now a 4th season, so it's a matter of stubborn pride, but I'd like to keep it running as I'm now emotionally attached. It continues to work well despite the significant lake effect we've been having.

Someone else suggested that it might be the governor too. Is there a simple way for me (with limited small engine skills) to try to adjust the governor?

Thanks,
Sno-man

 
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02-07-07, 04:41 PM   #4  
What are the engine ID numbers? If you can't locate the numbers due to rust-wear, then at least let me know what the horsepower is. The numbers I need will be on the flywheel shroud. Either in the vicinity of the spark plug or down on the side of the cover just below the carburetor on a riveted tag. Based on the fact that it is older, I'd say you have a H-series Tecumseh and in such case the governor adjustment is as follows: 1-With the carb cover removed, loosen (using either a small flat blade screwdriver or a 1/4 inch nut driver) the governor arm extension screw (right near the point that the carb-to-gov arm linkage attaches to the arm). 2-Lightly apply a leftward pressure on the governor arm (not the extension). 3-Hold the throttle shaft at Wide Open Throttle (WOT), which is a counterclockwise motion. 4-Tighten screw back down. Done, static adjustment set. If the engine is not a 5,6 or 7 horse H-series then post back and the adjustment will be similar but not the same and I can walk you through that one, if needed. If you still suspect an insufficient governor response after the static adjustment is made then you may have internal governor issues.

 
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02-18-07, 04:29 AM   #5  
thanks again

Thanks for your info on adjusting the governor, and sorry for the tardy reply.
I caved and have decided to send it to a local repair shop. I think I'll leave it to an expert.
Sno-man

 
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02-18-07, 07:48 AM   #6  
Small engines do not develop full power until they are run wide open. I never run a small engine below full speed under load. Running at less than full speed under load is a major handicap for the engine and can lead to rapid deterioration. This applies to all small engine driven machines. I see so many small engines just putt, putting along....
As to it's snow throwing ability, you might check the belt tension, adjust the cable, etc. and a favorite of mine is a good clean chute with about 4 coats of Johnson floor wax on it. Really helps the snow slide through, especially if it's wet and/or heavy.


Last edited by backyardwonder; 02-18-07 at 07:50 AM. Reason: spelling
 
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