fuel injector/carb cleaner?

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  #1  
Old 04-06-07, 12:41 PM
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fuel injector/carb cleaner?

Would it be advisable to add a proportional amount of automotive fuel injector/carb cleaner to the gas of my lawn mower and tiller? I left some gas in my tiller over the winter and thought this might disolve any gum buildup in it and my mower.
Is fuel stabilizer essentially the same as fuel injector/carb cleaner?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 02:07 PM
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Personally, I never use additives and don't believe in them. I just make sure all fuel tanks are drained and the engine is run until it stalls out before putting any machine away for any length of time. If your engine is running decently with fresh gas, I wouldn't be too concerned about any buildup in the fuel system.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 02:31 PM
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Ok, thanks.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 02:35 PM
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I agree with backyard with respect to additives, other than fuel stabilizer, in that they are a waste of money. If you have a fuel starvation issue, the best option is to remove, clean (soak in a bath cleaner, if necessary) and recondition the carburetor. I disagree with backyard with the storage procedure he recommends though. Why? Running the engine until it stalls still leaves a small amount of fuel in the carb bowl. This minute amount of gas will varnish much quicker than a full bowl of gas. I recommend keeping a half tank of gas and using a fuel stabilizer and, if the equipment is stored in a warm/hot climate, running the engine once a month during storage periods. If, on the other hand, it is stored in a cool/cold climate, it is usually not necessary to run monthly. The half tank purpose is so that upon taking the unit out of storage you can now add a half tank of fresh (less than 3 months) gasoline!
 
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Old 04-06-07, 03:36 PM
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Thanks. I don't think I will have a fuel starvation issue, just wanted to avoid it later.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 04:18 PM
Azis
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Puey I agree with your method, (although I have never used stabilizer, as I have had no problems without it) However...Most owners manuals do say to run the engine until the fuel supply is exhausted. For storage over 30 days.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 07:00 PM
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Equipment manufacturer manuals or engine manufacturer manuals? As for your stabilizer use, or lack thereof, I'd say you either live in a cool climate OR you run your engine regularly during storage periods. For if you run it dead, you still have fuel left in the fuel bowl. Agree? The smaller the quantity of gas the higher the incidence rate of varnish accumulation due to the byproduct of evaporative fuel. Since it is the fuel vapor that creates the varnish, a full fuel bowl will keep the critical parts (emulsion tube and the main jet) submerged in gas and therefore greatly reduce accumulation of varnish on the metering components. And, greater amounts of gasoline will evaporate at a slower rate due to the time needed to cook the fuel to a sufficient temperature to begin the evaporation process. While cold temperatures don't halt varnish accumulation altogether, it greatly minimizes it. We can thank evening cool temperatures for the deceleration of gum deposits in the carburetor due to its inability to "boil". Here is a reference from a major gasoline manufacturer's website as it relates to stored gasoline: 22. How long can I store gasoline without it going bad?
Gasoline stored in a tightly closed container in a cool place will stay good for at least one year. It is better if the container or fuel tank is almost (95 percent) full. If the container or fuel tank will be in the direct sun or will be heated above 30C (80F) much of the time, add an aftermarket fuel stabilizer to the gasoline when you first buy it. Gasoline-oil blends for two-stroke cycle engines stored under the proper conditions will keep as well as gasoline itself.
Notice the reference to "cool places", "almost full" gas tank, and heat above "80 degrees". Also, the reason they recommend a "tightly closed" container is that no outside source of oxygen can come into play, which increases the evaporation process. Just something for you and all the readers of this to consider.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 07:55 PM
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I agree. The only thing I reccomend differently is to keep the tank completely full during storage (if opting to not drain the entire system). In my area, the humidity is always pretty high, and a half-full tank will accumulate a lot of condensation, which winds up in the carburetor. The air in the tank gets warm during the day, expands, and pushes out through the tank vent. Then, during the night, air enters the tank as the inside tank air condenses. Then the moisture condenses on the insides of the tank overnight. Then the next day, the tank warms up, pushes out the air, until the evening when it draws in more moisture-laden air to add more condensation to the engine and the cycle continues every 24 hours. A full tank doesn't allow much room for air, so condensation is minimized.

Just thought I'd add that little bit of info to the mix.
 

Last edited by cheese; 04-06-07 at 09:01 PM.
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Old 04-06-07, 08:58 PM
Azis
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I'd have to say I've seen it in both manuals for Equipment and Engine, Briggs for sure I seen just yesterday lookin for sumin else.
I've used the same practice on the plains in Kansas and now in the Pacific Northwest. Fortunately I have always had an old barn with high roofs lots of air movement and concrete floor. Temperature changes are gradual more like ground temp than air temp.
I agree about fuel being left in the bowl on both accounts. If ran dry some will remain, and if full less or no varnish will accumulate. I would be all for draining the fuel from both the tank and carb if say it were to be stored in an enclosed area.
Thanks for the time to provide the info. My training is in Aviation Maintenance so I understand a bit about temp pressure and all, and actually studied the production of petroleum products as part of the curriculum.
 
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