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Opinions on Simplicity Landlord


BikerBill's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 218
MA

07-10-07, 04:05 AM   #1  
Opinions on Simplicity Landlord

I am considering purchasing a used (9 or 10 year old) Simplicity Landlord tractor. It comes with a 44" mower deck, a single-stage snowthrower that looks to be about 42" wide, and a utility dump cart. It is equipped with electric PTO and and an electric mechanism for raising/lowering the deck or snowthrower. The hour meter shows 176 hours. I checked the compression and both cylinders read about 145 psi. The transmission and attachments are belt driven. The tractor has not been used for lawn cutting for several years. It has a Briggs & Stratton Vanguard 16 hp V-twin engine that starts, runs, and idles fine. The tractor was stored in a heated garage and there is just one external rust spot on the deck. Overall, I'd say the tractor and attachments are in very good condition (and I'm pretty critical).

I'm really not familiar with Simplicity and was wondering what those of you who are familiar with it think of their products. Are there any trouble prone areas on this model tractor or snowthrower? How is the reliability in general? Are there any bad design features? This tractor has a lever by the steering wheel that controls forward/neutral/reverse and the speed instead of foot pedals. In essence it has cruise control that is automatically set every time you change the speed/direction. I guess that may take a little getting used to but it doesn't seem like a big deal and may turn out to be quite handy.

I will be using this tractor on a property that has some hills. The engine has a spin-on filter so I'm assuming it has a pressurized lubrication system. I always worry about splash lube engines on hills not getting enough oil but I shouldn't have that worry about that here. The hydrostatic transmission is made by Hydrogear (model 216-3010L CT) and also has a spin-on filter.

The steering has a little more play in it than my current Toro. I don't know if that's adjustable or just characteristic of the design.

Any opinions, experiences or guidance with the Simplicity Landlord would be much appreciated. I'd be particularly interested in the single stage snowthrower performance as I live in New England. By the way, the seller is asking $2800 for the package.

 
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repair_guy's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2004
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AL

07-10-07, 08:36 AM   #2  
I'm from way down in the southern part of the USA.And used to work at a place that sold & sirviced Simplicity mowers and tractors.Our growing season is from from about the middle of April, sometimes on through September so as you can imagen anything gets a good workout here.I've hardly ever seen a Simplicity come into the repair shop if that says anything.

 
cheese's Avatar
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GA

07-10-07, 07:02 PM   #3  
I think you're looking at a quality machine, but $2800 for a 10 year old mower sounds a bit high. I guess with 176 hours (is that accurate?), and indoor storage, etc..., maybe it's not that bad. What do they cost new? Simplicity isn't a name I see often in my area. I don't think we've ever had a simplicity dealer in this whole region for any length of time. I know they build the snapper tractors now. The Simplicitys I've seen were decent machines. The 16hp vanguard is bulletproof. It's japanese, and will compete with hondas and kawasakis for power, durability, and reliability.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
puey61's Avatar
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07-11-07, 03:35 AM   #4  
We work on many Simplicity's at my shop (but don't let this be a deterent, as we work on close to 1500 machines per year) and they are a very strong tractor and, as Cheese indicated, this is great engine. The hydro tranny is about the best aluminum case tranny you'll get and the fact you're getting a thrower attachment and that it has such low hours and appears to be in mint condition makes this a good deal. When new, I'd say the package would have listed for around six grand so a little under half the cost when new is a fair deal. Perhaps the owner will sweeten the deal and let it go for $2500.

 
BikerBill's Avatar
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07-11-07, 04:54 AM   #5  
Aluminum vs. Cast Iron

I had no idea the Briggs Vanguard was Japanese. I know that both Honda and Kawasaki engines are viewed very favorably so it's good to know the Briggs is in the same league. As for the hydro tranny, what are the tradeoffs between aluminum and cast iron casings? I know aluminum is a better heat conductor than cast iron so for cooling purposes it's a better material. I'm assuming that cast iron is tougher overall but if I'm not ramming the tranny into rocks (and I won't be) does it make much difference? Cast iron would certainly put more weight on the drive wheels and in winter that would be good. But some hefty wheel weights and chains come with the tractor so I don't see that as an issue.

I also question whether the hour meter is correct. I will check to make sure at least it hasn't been disconnected.

I passed the asking price by a Simplicity dealer (there's one just about 6 miles from the property where the tractor will be used) and he also thought the price was a little high. So I'll see if there's some wiggle room there.

Thanks so much for sharing your views and experience. There's just nothing like experience!

 
puey61's Avatar
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07-11-07, 05:15 PM   #6  
The tranny should hold up well for mowing and throwing snow, it's just that you wouldn't want to haul heavy trailers (boat, snowmobile, etc.) around or use a dozer blade or a tiller attachment with this machine. While this tranny would do all of the above, it would put increased wear and tear on it and would shorten the life of it. The bigger, sturdier cast trannys are more suited to handle these heavier, demanding chores. By all means, use wheel weights and tire chains in the winter. Do not use a rear weight box and stuff this with 200 pounds of weight as this will ruin the axle bearings quickly and take a toll on the chassis where the trans mounts up.

 
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