Husqvarna 55 starting problems

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  #1  
Old 09-12-07, 02:30 AM
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Husqvarna 55 starting problems

Hello,

I have a Husqvarna 55 (about 12 years old). This year I ran a few tanks with new gas ("Aspen" premixed, low emission eco thing)and it has stoped working all together, won't start at all. Below is what I have done:

>changed the air filter
>changed the spark plug
>cleanned the Carburator
>Muffler is clear
>Have good blue spark
>changed the fuel filter
>Cylynder walls look clear but the piston has a few lines on it and can feel Very slight grooves on it. ??
-Could the piston be damaged but not the cylinder wall? Anyone have a picture of sorts of what a damaged piston looks like?
>pull on it and maybe 1 pop
>tried messing with the H L and get the above pop
>fuel goes through and comes out the muffler after lots of pulling

Anyways, been looking around the site and tried these things and am at a loss Any help or advise is greatly appreciated and thanked in advance.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 02:37 AM
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Forgot to say also that there is suction when I take the sparkplug off crank the engine with my finger over the hole.
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-07, 10:15 AM
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look for damage from bad mix on the exaust side of the piston. if you see none have the compression checked.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 10:16 AM
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If you have good blue spark at the right time, enough air, and properly metered fuel the only thing left is compression I think. You say you have suction but is there any pressure to indicate compression? Maybe a compression check with a gauge is in order? I can't comment on your gas comment because I have no clue what it is. Hang in here and the pros will be along soon.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 12:32 PM
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The oil may have a play in this but since I, too, have never heard of such we'll assume it is a good oil for now. However, do you know the ratio you have mixed the fuel at? To help you determine your area of trouble I recommend purchasing a squirt can (typically used for oil and found at most automotive stores) that you can fill with your gas mix and use as a feeder into the carburetor throat. You'll want a second person to either operate the saw or to squirt the fuel mix into the throat of the carb. Ideally, if you have a bench vise to clamp the bar into would be most helpful to sturdy the saw during this procedure, otherwise use due caution. Remove the air filter so that you expose the carb throat. It will be hard for me to tell you how much you need to squirt so use you best judgement. Too much and you'll have a flooding issue and too little and you won't get the desired rexults. Attempt to keep the saw running for 30 seconds or so using the squirtting fuel, as need and metered just right, so that you know if you have a fuel delivery issue or not. If you can keep the saw running then you indeed have a carburetor issue but if you don't even get a hint of a running engine then you'll need to look elsewhere. Perform this test and post back with the results.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 01:30 PM
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Thanks so far

Thanks so far
I will clarify on the fuel thing. It is a premixed 2cycle fuel made by Husqvarna (called "Aspen")with far less emmisions, kind of a eco thing.
There is fuel running to the cylinder and it even starts comming out the exhaust after several pulls. It also starts to puff a little out the exhaust as well after several pulls.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 04:53 PM
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OK, which indicates a severely flooded engine crankcase. Two things would then need to be done. One, cure the flooding issue. Two, flush the crankcase of the excessive fuel. The flooding will be cured by removing, soaking and reconditioning the carburetor with a full rebuild kit, not just cleaning the carb. To flush out the crankcase you'll need a can of carb/choke spray cleaner and some compressed air. Remove the carburetor (which you'll already have done to recondition it), remove the muffler (flush this out too with spray cleaner and air), remove the spark plug, position the piston at TDC (top dead center), spray two seconds worth of carb/choke cleaner into the intake port, cover the exhaust port and spark plug hole with a white absorbent cloth, crank the engine over several times. Repeat this as many times as needed until you have a clear stream of cleaner only from the exhaust port and spark plug hole. Once you are confident you have gotten the majority of the fuel out of the crankcase use the compressed air to blow out the crankcase through the intake port with the piston at TDC.
 
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Old 09-19-07, 03:10 PM
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Thanks to all

WOW! Thanks for all your help! It worked very well, it took a little adjustments to the carb but runs like a new saw after doing what you said. I have run a few tanks and everything runs great. I f this isn't what you do for a living it should be. Thanks again
 
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Old 09-20-07, 12:14 PM
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You're welcome, and yes, this is my living. My wife says it should be my living but not my life. Such is the life of a business owner though.
 
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