Do a few additional cc's in engine size make a difference?

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  #1  
Old 09-24-07, 06:56 AM
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Do a few additional cc's in engine size make a difference?

I bought a 14" 30cc Echo chainsaw. I don't use a chainsaw much, but when I do, I want it to have enough power. This 30cc model, while cutting great (nice sharp chain) still would get slow down and stop (not the engine, rpms stayed high). I'd have to back out and go on slower, not pressing too hard. With a sharp chain remember.

I was cutting an 8" diameter hickory stump down. I'm thinking a need a large engine to be happy with it, but how much of a difference would say a 33cc be over a 30? Or do you really need a bigger jump than that?

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Old 09-24-07, 04:38 PM
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I am not quite sure how to answer you without possibly offending you, so please bare in mind that is not my intention.

First off, if you do not use a chain saw that much, what do you base your experience on determining the chain is sharp?

Secondly, hickory is one of the hardest woods you will cut, and most likely will require a "Real Saw" for much cutting. It should however, being an echo (I have used one of these small saw's and they will hold their own) cut 8" diameter wood. You mention cutting a stump? If you saw into the dirt or any other debris, you can almost assure that your chain is no longer "sharp" Also your chain may be getting pinched in the cut which will cause the clutch to slip. Either use a felling wedge or do not cut deeper than the bar width, remove and cut from the other side.

If you do step up I would recommend going up to a size that will accommodate a larger bar, 16" or 18". I have use a 36cc Husqy with a 16" bar
for many years and it has little trouble cutting maple of nearly twice the bar diameter when used properly with a "sharp" chain. The weight of the saw should be the only pressure required to make the cut.
 
  #3  
Old 09-24-07, 05:48 PM
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I think BFH is sending you in the right direction. If you have to "push" at all your chain is not sharp. The weight of the saw resting on the wood is all it needs to cut. If you're pushing, chances are the chain isn't sharp and is over-heating. If it starts to over-heat it can "mushroom" the bar, making the bar nearly as wide or wider than the chain. The bar will then drag or pinch in the kerf, making for very slow cutting, if at all. It will over work the engine, and can burn the clutch. With the chain off, run your fingers from the middle of the bar out towards the top and bottom cutting edge. There should be no lip, groove, or other noticeable difference in width. Blueing of the bar along the cutting edge is also a tell-tale sign of over heating, due to a dull chain or lack of oil.
If this is the case the bar will need to be dressed, as well as the chain sharpened (not just filed) or replaced.
Another question.. what kind of chain are you using? A safety chain will work fine for occasional use, and will stay sharp longer than a skip link or “chipper” chain.
 
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Old 09-24-07, 07:39 PM
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To chime along with the other guys, you have one of the best "little" saws you can buy, if the chain is sharpened properly it will cut anything the length of the bar if not forced, all day long. My $.02. Have a good one. Geo
 
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Old 09-25-07, 04:14 AM
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Why would that offend me? I'm not one of them. Thanks for trying to help.

I should clarify. I don't use a saw a lot each season, but I have enough experience with one. The saw I replaced was 42cc, but a lower end.

I also understand the importance of a sharp chain, and I sharpen it occasionally as I go with a file. I probably wasn't explaining myself well though. With a sharp chain (nice wood chips being spit out, not dust), it just bogs down, whether or not i'm pushing too hard. And it did it on a birch tree as well, not just the hickory.

So with a sharp chain and all, I think I may need a larger saw for the stuff I tend to use it for, unless I want to go nice and slow and cut in small pieces. Does this help a bit?
 
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Old 09-25-07, 04:58 AM
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I am curious about something you said:

This 30cc model, while cutting great (nice sharp chain) still would get slow down and stop (not the engine, rpms stayed high)
If everything is working as it should the rpm should slow down as the saw is loaded up.
Perhaps the clutch is worn or has oil on it?
 
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Old 09-25-07, 01:49 PM
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It's one of those things that I think is hard to explain in words. It's not 100% the same, the RPMs I mean. You can hear it loading up and then the chain will stop, and I have to back off. I don't feel I'm pressing very hard, as I usually let the saw cut at it's own pace, assuming a sharp chain. My question is around if a few more CCs would keep it going the cases this happens. It's not binding on the tree or anything, it just seems to not have enough grunt to keep on going.

It sounds like my explanation of what I'm experiencing is poor. I'll think about another way to phrase it.

Thanks though.
 
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Old 09-25-07, 05:49 PM
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If the chain is "grabbing" the wood causing the chain to stop & the clutch to slip, You may have the "rakers" in front of the cutters filed too low. A quick check is the cutter should be about the thickness of a dime lower than the top of the cutter. Also make sure the chain is adjusted properly. The Oregon website has excellent sharpening & troubleshooting section fro saw chains. Good Luck, Roger
 
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Old 09-25-07, 06:18 PM
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3 cc's makes a difference in an engine that is otherwise the same, but not leaps and bounds. I think everyone here is in agreement that your 30cc echo should be doing the job in this scenario. I think your symptoms sound like the saw has no "oomph" when it's loaded. This would indicate to me that it's running too lean, and the high speed mixture screw may need to be backed out 1/8 or 1/4 turn. Another possibility would be restricted exhaust (spark arrestor carboned up).

If it's the clutch slipping, put the bar brake on and start the engine. Can you rev it up easily with the brake on? If so, I would think the clutch is the problem.
 
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Old 10-23-07, 05:57 PM
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To pull this thread back to life, I've been shopping around again and I think I want a 16" anyway.

So, and I'm sure this has been asked before, is the opinions on Husqvarna vs Stihl one of preference or is one really better than the other? I'm looking at a 16" Husky 142 with a 40cc engine.

Thanks
 
  #11  
Old 10-23-07, 11:33 PM
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I think it's a matter of preference in most cases. I do favor stihl a bit over husq myself. I'm not familiar with the model you listed, but if it's a made-in-sweeden husqvarna rather than a poulan in orange, then it should be a good one. Some of husqvarna's lower line saws are not the real husqvarna.
 
  #12  
Old 10-24-07, 04:27 AM
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Originally Posted by cheese View Post
I think it's a matter of preference in most cases. I do favor stihl a bit over husq myself. I'm not familiar with the model you listed, but if it's a made-in-sweeden husqvarna rather than a poulan in orange, then it should be a good one. Some of husqvarna's lower line saws are not the real husqvarna.
I didn't know that. Very interesting. It's at Lowes. But it is listed on the Husq website as well. How could I be sure?
 
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