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backup generator


Roeboat109's Avatar
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11-14-07, 01:36 PM   #1  
backup generator

if the average homeowner were to look for a backup generator say reg gas .how big an outfit powerwize should he look for to fit his needs ? he probably wants to run the bare essentials and change off for what he needs most right? im not talking all that much money ,less than $1,000.00. most furnaces arent wires to plug in. ive been looking at these for over a year.there are all kinds and sizes. what engine is good and how many receptacles,i suppose the most you can get.is a 220 important or not? i just want peace of mind through the winter if at all possible. thanks for any advice.i know nothing about this.

 
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core's Avatar
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11-14-07, 04:23 PM   #2  
Not quite sure where to start with that post. You will need to determine how much power you will need, and that will come from precise measurement of everything you will be running in the event of a power outage.

I think what you need to do is visualize exactly how you are going to use this when the power goes out. You spoke of receptacles and then on the other hand correctly point out that your furnace has no such plug. What exactly are you planning on doing with respect to that? Or is this generator only going to be used for your refrigerator and a few other things plugged in near that location?

 
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11-14-07, 06:25 PM   #3  
I would suggest you go to Coleman's website. They have a chart that shows what most stuff uses as far as watts. Probably a genny with the power to run an electric furnace would be way over $1000. But could you settle for a space heater in a small sealed off room? Lights take very little watts. even a heat lamp would be easier to run on a smaller genny. Most 5000 watt gennies are about $600. think about a 20 amp circuit in your home, It can run lots of small stuff. most 5000 watt gennies have 2 20 amp 120 volt plugs and a 30 amp 220 plug. Of course with the correct wiring of an adapter box you can change that 220 to two 120 volt, 30 amp plugs! Though the genny will only run about 5 hrs. on a tank of gas at full capacity and remember if the load stops and starts you have to allow for the start-up surge that could be 1 1/2 times the watts of running. (fridge for instance)
If you want to run almost the whole house or if you think the power will be out for more than a day or night then you need to think about a whole house genny that runs on propane or natural gas and they are expensive and not a DIY job.

 
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11-14-07, 11:04 PM   #4  
To choose a generator, you need a fine tuned list of things you are planning to run with it. As mentioned, if you are ok with a space heater in one room, you are ok. If you want to run your furnace, you probably aren't going to get something for 1K. If you want to run a freezer and/or fridge at the same time as a heater, you will need to look at power requirements of the devices and choose a generator based on that. A 5000 watt generator should run most fridges, but might not run the fridge along with a heater. (depends on the requirements of each).

220 is nice...especially if you have a well and want to power it once in a while for some running water. (again, check power requirements of your well).

I would suggest purchasing one with either a briggs vanguard, or a honda engine. These would probably be the most reliable and quietest. Well worth the extra dollars.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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11-17-07, 01:34 PM   #5  
backup generator

my neighbor has one of those permanent type generators that kick in automatically that cost around $5000.00 or so . i just want to prepare hopefully for no more than a few days or hours at most. if more than that im packing up ,going to someones house who has power and help with the dishes.

 
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12-04-07, 02:52 PM   #6  
backup generator

i never figured up yet how much power i really need but i saw an add in menards flyer today that had a wen 5000 waat 13 h.p. ovh.5000 continuous waat . 4/120vrecand1/240/120locking recep. $449.00 they are a gas pull start.i reallize it would have to be converted to plug the furnace into it,if i ever decide to run the furnace on it. is wen any good at all. do they make their own motors or what motor is on them? how does this unit sound to you for the general homeowner? its on wheels .i dont know how long the cord is.i didnt ask all the questions i wanted to yet.

 
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12-04-07, 05:52 PM   #7  
Forget the Menards generator - problems from day one. Your best bet is to look at Briggs Power Products, Generac Power Products or Coleman. They also have panels that go between the house breaker box and the generator that will isolate the house from the utility company so a feed back does not cause injury to the utility workers in case of an outage. These boxes can be wired for only certain circuits, such as refrig, freezer, furnace, well, and emergency lighting. Best to have a good electrician wire this in as you are liable if the wiring causes an injury. Had a utility worker electrocuted in my old home town last year due to this.

 
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