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Gas Spraying out of the muffler on starting


JohnFL's Avatar
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MS

04-29-08, 09:49 AM   #1  
Gas Spraying out of the muffler on starting

I have a Crftsman lawn tractor, when the tractor hasn't been started for a bit & then is started there is gas spraying from the muffler. Can anyone tell me what the problem might be. I certainly would appreciate any help I can get. Thanks
Regards
John

 
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04-29-08, 05:59 PM   #2  
You have a fuel leak within the carburetor that, while at rest, is time enough to fill up the muffler (and likely the crankcase) with fuel. You will need to recondition the carburetor and be sure to change the engine oil (and filter, if applicable) before you run the engine again. Fuel in the engine oil can cause severe internal engine damage. Post back the the make, model, type/spec and serial/code numbers off the engine.

 
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04-30-08, 02:14 PM   #3  
It is a Craftsman 15 hp, Model#944.607752. The engine is Kohler [email protected] type number PS-41526

 
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04-30-08, 06:12 PM   #4  
Kohler part number 12 757 03-S, check with your local service shop that handles Kohler (most shops do) for this kit. Does the engine oil smell like it's diluted with gasoline?

 
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05-05-08, 04:00 AM   #5  
I put a new carburator kit on & there is still a small amount of gas getting through, about 2 teaspoons overnight. Any suggestions?

 
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05-07-08, 10:12 AM   #6  
Further to the gas spraying from the muffler when turning on the ride on mower . . . after the new carburator kit not completely fixing the leak I did put a manual shut off valve on the gas line for now, any other suggestions?
Thanks

 
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05-07-08, 03:19 PM   #7  
I,m not familiar with the kohler engine,does this carb. have a brass float,if so it may have a hole in it.Take the carb. apart and shake it if gas inside the float is bad needs to be replaced.Hope this helps.

Jerry

 
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05-07-08, 11:43 PM   #8  
It's still a carb problem. Does it have a rubber seat, or a brass seat? If it's the rubber seat, did you install a new one and make sure it was installed right side up? If it has a brass seat, did you clean it?


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05-08-08, 05:15 AM   #9  
A sticking fuel inlet needle will allow gas to flow out of the bowl into the engine as you describe. Fuel inlet needles will often drag, stick or not seat in the needle cavity due to dirt or corrosion. This dragging, sticking or not seating will allow fuel to flow past the needle.

Be sure to check the engine oil to see if gas has gotten in the crankcase. If gas has entered the crankcase and contaminated the oil, change the oil after you repair the carburetor.

Remove the carburetor bowl and the float and inlet needle. Pay attention to the position of the needle spring, if so equipped, it will need to go back in the same position.

With the plastic inlet seat removed, if installed, polish the needle cavity. I make a polishing tool using a wooden meat skewer with one end wrapped with NEVR-DULL metal polish. The wrapped tip should fit tightly in the needle cavity. Chuck the skewer in a drill and insert the end wrapped with the NEVR-DULL in the needle cavity. Operate the drill slowly several seconds and the needle cavity is usually clean and polished. If you do not have NEVR-DULL use a wooden skewer, wrap the tip with cotton then saturate the cotton with the metal polish of your choice.

Install and set inlet needle and float. Place a few drops of solvent or fuel on the inlet needle. If the carburetor is removed from the engine. Pressures test the needle seat by inverting the carburetor and applying 5-15 PSI air pressure to the fuel inlet fitting. A seat that functions properly should hold the pressure. Move the float with your finger and observe that it moves freely.

I do this to every carburetor I rebuild and rarely have problems.

Good luck

 
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