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honda hr214 carb adjustment for altitude


tkilleen's Avatar
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 1

07-26-08, 10:19 PM   #1  
honda hr214 carb adjustment for altitude

I've moved to 4500 ft and the lawnmower is woefully underpowered. please help.

 
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rogerflies's Avatar
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 150
GA

07-27-08, 03:51 AM   #2  
Is the exhaust sooty like the engine is running too rich? Have you looked at the sparkplug to see if it's sooty?

Engines will show a definite power loss at higher altitudes simply because the air is less dense. Holds true for athletes as well.

If the engine is showing signs of running too rich (sooty exhaust or plug), you might get some power back by installing a smaller jet in the carb, if you can find one. Otherwise you'll just have to get a larger engine. Or a supercharger.

Make sure the air filter is clean. Any restriction at all in the intake is going to make matters worse.

 
Airman's Avatar
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Join Date: Feb 2008
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TN

07-27-08, 08:14 AM   #3  
I suggest you first install a new NGK BP5ES spark plug. As Rogerflies said, “Make sure the air filter is clean.” If this does not change performance, I suggest you clean and adjust the carburetor.

You will need a gasket set when you reassemble the carburetor. In addition, you may consider replacing the float since it could be bad.

Honda has a special float height tool that simply tells you whether the height is good or bad. Carburetor floats are not adjustable and if it out of tolerance you replace the float and/or the float valve. With this said when you clean the carburetor I suggest either replace the float or run the mower to see if power is restored. If power is not regained, replace the float.

There are three main jets for the carburetor on your mower engine. The HR214 mower came with a #65 main jet. The main jets are sized for altitude accordingly, #65 (0.65mm) below 5000 feet, #62 (0.62mm) 5,000 to 8,000 feet and #60 (0.60mm) above 8000 feet. In rare cases, a smaller jet (#62) is needed to correct a problem such as you are experiencing.

The link below is a good guide for your carburetor:

http://www.honda-engines-eu.com/en/images/59138.pdf

 
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