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Poulan GBI 22V Blower engine rebuild


Abbynormal's Avatar
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08-13-08, 10:09 PM   #1  
Poulan GBI 22V Blower engine rebuild

Hey 30YEARTECH;
I had so much fun rebuilding that old Lawn-Boy so now I am going to rebuild an old GBI 22V blower. It does not run worth a hoot. I am going to see if new reed valve, rings and gaskets will get it better. Then if I have to I'll put a carb kit. Any way I tore it down and there is quite a bit of carbon build up in the top of the cylinder and around the dome for the plug. How can I remove it without scratching the cylinder wall???

 
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08-14-08, 04:43 AM   #2  
There are lots of available products to soften and clean up carbon in engines, I like seafoam myself. I have read of other products in the forums, something from Chevron comes to mind but I have never used it.

I am sure you will get some other suggestions as well.

Best of luck with your new adventure...

 
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08-14-08, 11:27 AM   #3  
Yeah I thought of that late last night after I posted. I always keep some Seafoam handy...good stuff! I put the spark plug in turned it upside down and put some in to marinate awhile. May let sit a few days till I get my parts. Hopefully by then it will come off easy with a pencil or something. Say...how do I get the spark arrester out of the muffler?

 
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08-14-08, 01:00 PM   #4  
Looks like there is a spring type clamp similar to a hose clamp holding the spark arrestor screen on the muffler. I use a propane torch to clean off the screen, just heat the screen up cherry red and either brush the screen with a steel brush or just blow it out with compressed air.

 
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08-14-08, 07:44 PM   #5  
Exhaust / Carb Mod for Walbro carb

I was thinking about opening up the muffler a little bit and also opening up the carb a little bit with some very small carb files to "hot rod" it a little. But I am not sure where to "operate" on the carb. Is it in the journal that is behind the little round screen that is recessed? It is a walbro WT14 carb. Will this benefit this motor much?

 
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08-14-08, 08:03 PM   #6  
I really could not advise you on this as I really am not sure how much you would need to take off to make a difference, or if it would make any difference.

Maybe someone else can give you some insight on the modifications that may help.

 
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08-14-08, 09:37 PM   #7  
Opening a jet in a 2 stroke carb is not generally beneficial and will probably decrease performance rather than increase unless you can find a way to allow or force more air into the engine. If you can do this, then you only have to open the H screw a bit to let more fuel in anyway, so opening the jet still hasn't got any use in that engine.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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08-15-08, 09:41 PM   #8  
Well I was trying to take a cue from what some of the chainsaw tuners do and add another port to the muffler which would cause the motor to run leaner thus needing more fuel. Anyway I did not try any of my needle files since I could not find them. I just kinda scratched a little with a pin. All my parts should be in Monday for me to do the rebuild. Also decided to go ahead and replace all the carb gaskets and diaphragms. I was just looking for a way to give this blower more punch. I am going to remove the bottom flap below the blower fan to give it less restriction on incoming air. I am hoping for about $20 in parts to revive an old blower that I probably would have just discarded before I learned how easy it was to find and get old parts and rebuild these little engines.

 
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08-16-08, 07:14 AM   #9  
IMHO, I would recommend you not mess with the carb until after the rebuild and you get the blower running, otherwise when the rebuild is finished and it doesn't run you won't know what to eliminate as not being the problem, the carb mods or something else. Have a good one. Geo

 
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08-16-08, 07:34 AM   #10  
Abbynormal;
Check out the info below about "tuned pipes", maybe it will help you make a hotrod out of your blower. Have a good one. Geo
http://www.rc-trucks.org/tuned-pipes.htm

 
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08-18-08, 05:14 AM   #11  
Re=assembly question

The piston has an indexing mark for the ring to hold it in one position. The cylinder has a tiny ridge i can feel where the split in the piston ring was. Should I ; A - reinstall split in same location? B - Flip over the piston 180 degrees ? C - Get someone to hone it? or D - get a new cylinder? I was wantin to stay cheap on this.

 
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08-18-08, 01:53 PM   #12  
The piston needs to be insalled the way it was before you took it apart. The reason being that the ring end gap is set up to ride in the cylinder so it does not get caught up on any of the ports, if you flip it over it may hang up somewhere and break.

 
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08-19-08, 12:41 AM   #13  
To add to what 30YT said, the piston should have a pin that forces you to install the ring in one position only, with that pin being in the ring end gap.

The cainsaw users have done a lot of things to the engine that allow it to take advantage of the increased fuel...even requiring it. In your engine, unless you really perform some drastic/unrealistic mods, it will just reduce performance, clog up the piston rings and cylinder with soot, and clog the exhasut port and burn your eyes with stinky rich exhaust. Your engine can't do anything with more fuel but spit it out as soot. There is a lot of figuring and tuning involved in boosting these little engines, not just scratching around with a file or pin. These jets are so sensitive that just a couple thousandths of an inch difference can destroy the performance of the engine. An air:fuel ratio of about 14:1 is what engines run on best. More than that and performance drops rapidly and emissions increase proportionately. Less than that and performance drops and wear increases. If you want to make the engine burn more fuel, you have to make it consume 14 times that much fuel in air, or it will only hurt performance.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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08-19-08, 05:58 PM   #14  
OMG IT IS ALIVE! (part deux)

Well it's all back together now and I ported the exhaust and intake along with putting a few more outlets in the muffler so it can burn the extra fuel. Now this things got some power!!! I like a little power in my power tools!

 
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