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leaf blower ruined?


sgull's Avatar
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11-01-08, 06:59 PM   #1  
leaf blower ruined?

By mistake straight gas was accidentally used to run my 2-stroke leaf blower instead of the required 50:1 mix. By the time this was discovered the blower had run almost 10 minutes on the straight gas. Miraculously, the blower still starts and runs after I drained the straight gas out of the tank and refilled with correct mix. After running it with the correct mix for 2-4 minutes at low idle, I continue to get excessive white smoke. What's probably going on? Pistons scored, rings blown, head gasket blown? Or not necessarily? Any suggestions other than "buy a new blower?"

 
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11-01-08, 07:11 PM   #2  
This is just an Old guy observation;
Whoever ran the blower realized there was no oil in the fuel and decided to correct by adding oil directly into the carb, exhaust port or spark plug hole. The white smoke is the oil burning off and all will be ok. Have a good one. Geo

 
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11-01-08, 07:30 PM   #3  
Posted By: geogrubb Whoever ran the blower realized there was no oil in the fuel and decided to correct by adding oil directly into the carb, exhaust port or spark plug hole. The white smoke is the oil burning off and all will be ok. Have a good one. Geo
Well that's certainly good to hear. Actually the person who realized there was no oil in the fuel then decided to pour an ounce or so of 2-stroke engine oil (excessive mix amount) directly into the fuel tank of the blower with the fuel tank full otherwise full of the straight gas, thinking this might help to run it extra rich for a while. The blower ran, but with excessive white smoke. After draining the tank and refilling with correct 50:1 mix, still getting some white smoke. Maybe I just need to let it burn off a little while longer? thanks Geo

 
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11-02-08, 10:35 AM   #4  
After you run it for a while it should clear up, then you might want to remove the muffler and check to see that the exhaust port and spark arrestor screen are clean, it could be carboned up from the excess oil. Have a good one. Geo

 
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11-02-08, 10:41 AM   #5  
Got a funny kinda related to your story. I was using gas powered hedgeclippers when I found out I didn't have any more 2cycle oil to put into gas, so I used Marvel Mystery Oil instead. It worked fine and the exhaust smelled like mint.

 
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11-02-08, 05:55 PM   #6  
Posted By: geogrubb After you run it for a while it should clear up, then you might want to remove the muffler and check to see that the exhaust port and spark arrestor screen are clean, it could be carboned up from the excess oil. Have a good one. Geo
Okay I ran it a while and it cleared up like you said it would. I'll take a look at the exhause port and spark arrestor like you suggested. thanks again. boy I was afraid there would have been more damage, sure glad that wasn't the case.

 
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11-02-08, 06:04 PM   #7  
Posted By: nightowlpunk Got a funny kinda related to your story. I was using gas powered hedgeclippers when I found out I didn't have any more 2cycle oil to put into gas, so I used Marvel Mystery Oil instead. It worked fine and the exhaust smelled like mint.
That is kinda funny. Out of curiosity I went to the Marvel Mystery Oil website, and, interestingly, I found the following in the Frequently Asked Questions section:

Can I use MMO in 2-cycle engines?
Yes, MMO is safe for use in 2-cycle engines. Replace 25% of the 2-cycle oil with MMO. For example, if use 8oz of 2-cycle oil, replace 2oz of 2-cycle with 2oz of MMO at oil change.

 
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11-04-08, 07:26 AM   #8  
Well unless you're emotionally attached to the thing maybe now is the time to invest in a better unit (if financially possible). What type was this one? Years ago I used a handheld model and it was OK, but once we invested in a backpack unit after buying larger property it was all over. I was hooked on that extra power. Later~

 
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11-04-08, 08:30 AM   #9  
Posted By: shadow745 Well unless you're emotionally attached to the thing maybe now is the time to invest in a better unit (if financially possible). What type was this one? Years ago I used a handheld model and it was OK, but once we invested in a backpack unit after buying larger property it was all over. I was hooked on that extra power. Later~
It's a Stihl BG85 handheld It has been a reliable unit and power seems to be adequate for what I need it for (relatively small area). It suits my my purposes at this time, and I'm emotionally attached to the thing so could never part with it. I'm sure a backpack unit would be great, however, for larger property.

 
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11-04-08, 11:32 AM   #10  
Yeah that looks to be a nice handheld, probably much stronger than the Sears unit we did have. If it still runs and sounds fine I'd just use it. You could probably take the muffler off and it might give you a good look inside the cylinder. Or you might even be able to remove the spark plug to see a little bit inside.

I still use a Sears brushcutter that my dad bought back around 1992. It was made in Japan for Sears and he got a killer deal on it. He gave it to me when he wasn't able to lug it around anymore. It's 38cc with the full length steel shaft with full bearing support, fairly heavy, etc..... I just do the usual maintenance on it each year and it's been running strong as ever going on 17 years now. Of course I'd like to retire it for something lighter and more fuel efficient, but since he passed away 3 months ago it means more than ever to keep it going. Later!

 
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11-04-08, 05:48 PM   #11  
Posted By: shadow745 You could probably take the muffler off and it might give you a good look inside the cylinder. Or you might even be able to remove the spark plug to see a little bit inside. I still use a Sears brushcutter that my dad bought back around 1992. it's been running strong as ever going on 17 years now.
Yeah I'll try and at least sneak a peak at the cylinder inside, as you suggest. That's cool that your old brushcutter is still in good shape after all these years. Hopefully if I keep on top of regular maintenance for my blower it'll last that long too.

 
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11-04-08, 07:04 PM   #12  
sgull;
I have a BG75 that I have had for a long time and is the only 2-cycle I have that I never think about not starting when I want to use it. I was given a Craftsman/Poulan/Weedeater Blower as a gift, I used it three times and gave it back. It blew more air than the Stihl, was lighter also, however, after three uses it was getting harder to start, recoil was sticking. I grabbed the Stihl it started on 3rd pull after setting for about 2 months. It acted a little funny for a while, maybe is was an "I told you so". Have a good one. Geo

 
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11-04-08, 08:01 PM   #13  
Go ahead, make my day...


 
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