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1970's Sears (Roper) Tractor Tie Rod Ends


jazmateta's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2008
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FL

11-27-08, 06:48 PM   #1  
1970's Sears (Roper) Tractor Tie Rod Ends

Hello All,
I'm not sure if I should be on this tread or over on the ATV/Go-cart threads since part of my question has to do with parts related to them.

I have an older (late 1970's) Sears yard tractor, which I understand was made by Roper, taken over at some time by AYP, that is in need of a hip replacement. For a 30 year old machine, this is the only problem that I have with it!

The tie rod end on the right side tire has fallen off the center post that is at the steering column. Of course, this is the right handed tie rod end and it doesn't appear to be made at all any longer. Can find the left handed one - which is still servicable. These are left and right handed female threads of 1/2"-20 with 3/16"-20 male post. I can find the same sized female threads in both left and right handed for a John Deere, but the male post is also 1/2" and the ones I need are 3/16". I'm not inclinded to attempt to drill out the steel plates where these connect. One of my options would be to get the JD ones and then use a tap and die set to whittle away at the threads of the posts - but I feel that may compromise the integrity of this steering mechanism.

I have come up with one other solution to my problem. I have found the same female threading on Hime joints as well. However, I cannot find any diagrams that will show me how the Hime joint is attached to the steel plates. I realize that it would be some type of stud going thru the Hime and then attached to the plate, but I'd really like to know what I am looking for so that I could get the right pieces to fix this hip joint problem on my tractor.

Any diagrams, info on the name of the studs, help in finding the proper tie rod ends, or finding a new tie rod with proper ends for the tractor would be greatly appreciated. I need to get this tractor steering in the same direction on both sides soon as I need to hook up the plow in order to lay some irrigation lines to plant some fruit trees soon!

Thanks for any help you can offer!

Jazmateta

 
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cheese's Avatar
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11-27-08, 08:46 PM   #2  
Drilling the hole to accommodate the larger post size would be ten times easier than trying to make the threaded post smaller with a die. That's what I'd do. Just use a regular drill and drill bit...it should drill the hole in seconds....unless I'm missing something here that would complicate the process???


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
jazmateta's Avatar
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11-28-08, 05:38 AM   #3  
70's Mower

Good Morning,
The main reasons that I prefer not to drill the plates are: 1) too hard to get off the mower (entire wheel assembly and steering - under the housing - would need to be removed) and 2) the holes are already close to the edge of the metal plates in a pre-formed area, of course where the pressure would be. Also, this should be hardened steel, harder to drill and keep it straight - been there on a bumper .

As previously stated, this is the only thing wrong with the mower and it's only one side (but I will replace both sides when the parts are determined), no sense in making it worse by removing items that don't need to be removed ; )

Thanks,
Jazmateta

 
cheese's Avatar
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11-28-08, 01:04 PM   #4  
It's not hardened steel.

Other than finding the correct parts, I still think that's what I'd do. I think you mean you have 7/16" ends on the tie rods (instead of 3/16" which would be so tiny it would break the first time you used it). If so, that is only 1 sixteenth of an inch difference. When enlarging the hole, that equates to each side of the hole being 1 thirty-second of an inch farther out from the center. If the hole is so close to the edge of the plate that 1/32" will make a difference, something is wrong.

Another option is to make new rods with threaded ends that accept the joints available to you.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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