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Pressure Washer Siphoning Tube


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04-13-09, 07:54 PM   #1  
Pressure Washer Siphoning Tube

What do you do with the pressure washer detergent siphoning tube if you are not planning to use detergent?

The last pressure washer that I had lost most of it's pressure/flow if I didn't either clamp this hose or stick it in a bucket of water. However, I have borrowed pressure washers from friends that worked fine with the siphon hose just hanging on the support handle.

I just bought a floor model Craftsman model 580.752230 that came as is without the detergent tube, etc. (This was fine with me as I never use detergent) The owners manual only directs you to stick the siphon tube into a bottle of determent... but does not cover what to do if you don't want or need to use the detergent.

Do I need to connect a tube and clamp it to prevent the pump from sucking air?

Thanks,

Steve

 
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04-13-09, 08:38 PM   #2  
It will not suck air with high pressure in the hose. However, there is a check valve in the Tee that will allow water to spray from the detergent hose if it is not sealing. The only solution is replace the fitting.

 
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04-14-09, 03:35 AM   #3  
Once you remove that fitting, you will see a little ball. Don't lose it. That is what seals off the siphoning tube when not in use. My fitting got totally grossed out and it didn't let the ball seat, so I was having pressure vent through the siphoning tube port. Cleaned it all up and it worked fine.

 
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04-14-09, 04:05 AM   #4  
in the injector there is a ball and a spring that seats on an o ring. if all those parts are intact you won't get any blowback. on most units using the high pressure tips will not net any pressure loss through the injector. anytime you're done with the unit it's a good idea to flush the injector with fresh water and shoot some WD into the intake port on the injector to protect the ball and spring.

 
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04-14-09, 05:21 AM   #5  
I am not sure if I understand how this thing works yet... are you guys saying there is a ball check valve to keep water from leaking out of the siphon fitting? (my last pressure washer actually sucked air in.)

Seems to me, I will have to cap off the siphon hose?? Or does the siphon hose fitting somehow only allow water (or detergent) to pass... but stop air?

 
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04-14-09, 05:45 AM   #6  
I never use the siphon function - I think a pump up garden sprayer works better to apply the cleaning agent.

If I remember right, they only siphon at low pressure. My PW came with a siphon hose, I think it's still attached - I don't use it and have never had any issues because of it.


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04-14-09, 01:08 PM   #7  
Posted By: marksr I never use the siphon function - I think a pump up garden sprayer works better to apply the cleaning agent.

If I remember right, they only siphon at low pressure. My PW came with a siphon hose, I think it's still attached - I don't use it and have never had any issues because of it.

You're kidding right? No way will a garden sprayer work more efficiently than applying the detergent with the PW..... There are soap nozzles available that will throw the suds as high as 20' up and that same nozzle can be switched to apply a wide band at close ranges, maybe a 2-3 ft. wide pattern. How can a sprayer come close to these options?

I think the OP is confused as to how downstream injection works...... simple. When you use your detergent nozzle this creates a venturi effect and effectively pulls detergent/water solution through the hose where it enters the stream of water exiting the pump. Upstream injection is also possible and that introduces the cleaning solution before the pump so it's applied at high pressure. Pretty much all home models and some commercial units have downstream. Downstream also allows you to use bleach and other caustic/acidic solutions without harming the pump. You do need to rinse everything well and run lots of fresh water through your gun, wand, hoses, etc. after using bleach or whatever, but if you have downstream injection this will not hurt the pump like alot of people think. In this case the chemicals never see the inside of the pump. Hope this helps. Later!

 
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04-14-09, 01:18 PM   #8  
Well, I like using a garden sprayer for certain applications as well. Easier to gauge the amount applied, and they can easily reach 20ft on a stream setting.

I tried using the low pressure suction a couple of times..but it would suck the bottle dry if I didn't set it right.

Just a homeowner though...might be different if I was working for a living....lol.


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04-14-09, 01:32 PM   #9  
"There are soap nozzles available that will throw the suds as high as 20' up and that same nozzle can be switched to apply a wide band at close ranges, maybe a 2-3 ft. wide pattern. How can a sprayer come close to these options?"

That's what they make ladders for
As noted above, using a garden sprayer gives you better control of the cleaning agent. I'm not a big fan of high pressure - it's too easy to unknowingly cause damage. I always try to use the loest pressure that will do the job.


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04-14-09, 05:27 PM   #10  
Posted By: shadow745 When you use your detergent nozzle this creates a venturi effect and effectively pulls detergent/water solution through the hose where it enters the stream of water exiting the pump.
I still don't understand what's to stop the siphon when other nozzles are used... or are you guys saying that the flow is so slow with a high pressure nozzle that there is no venturi effect at all?? I guess sucking a little air in with the water on the pressure side of the pump won't hurt anything anyway.

After reading your posts... I am pretty sure my old washer had the siphon hose on the low pressure (suction) side of the pump. Which probably explains why I had to clamp off the hose to avoid cavitating the pump. Once this washer would "lose its prime", I would ususally have to shut it down and go thru the water flush again before I could get it to work.

Personnally I never use chemicals. I only use the washer to either clean my deck or my boat. I haven't found a deck chemical yet that seems to do anything (I'm open to suggestions) and my boat is permanently in the water so I avoid the chemicals running into the lake.

 
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04-14-09, 05:51 PM   #11  
The soap hose is on the discharge or high pressure side of the pump. It will only work when the pressure in the hose is lower than atmospheric pressure (14.5 psi). That is why detergent cannot be applied with high pressure, the lowest setting on variable nozzles or the special fixed tip must be used.
It still would not work on the inlet side because the water pressure from the tap is much higher than atmospheric. Also, detergent would be very hard on the pump's internals.

 
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04-14-09, 09:29 PM   #12  
You should never have to cap off or otherwise block the detergent inlet. I guess it won't hurt if you want to do it, but there should be no need to. If pressure is leaking out there is a problem with the check ball that needs to be repaired. It shouldn't allow any pump to "cavitate" either. Sounds like your old pump had some issues.


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04-15-09, 06:53 PM   #13  
Posted By: DIY-Steve I still don't understand what's to stop the siphon when other nozzles are used... or are you guys saying that the flow is so slow with a high pressure nozzle that there is no venturi effect at all?? I guess sucking a little air in with the water on the pressure side of the pump won't hurt anything anyway.

After reading your posts... I am pretty sure my old washer had the siphon hose on the low pressure (suction) side of the pump. Which probably explains why I had to clamp off the hose to avoid cavitating the pump. Once this washer would "lose its prime", I would ususally have to shut it down and go thru the water flush again before I could get it to work.

Personnally I never use chemicals. I only use the washer to either clean my deck or my boat. I haven't found a deck chemical yet that seems to do anything (I'm open to suggestions) and my boat is permanently in the water so I avoid the chemicals running into the lake.

For most home surfaces I use a mix of 1 pint of Simple Green, 1 pint of 6% bleach and mix these with 3/4 gallon of water, then run this through the detergent hose. The bleach does great for mold, mildew, etc. and the Simple Green gives it a nice smell and clinging effect so it stays in contact longer with the surface. It's a great all-around cleaning combination that won't harm surfaces, plants, etc.

Most people think the pressure does most of the work, but in reality cleaners do most of the work and let you do a better job quicker. Think about it this way..... say you don't use any detergents on your deck that is covered with mold, mildew, etc. It isn't coming off so what do you do? Most would apply more pressure, but this usually damages the wood. Best thing to do is add a bit of bleach and drop back on the pressure and save it for concrete or similar surfaces. Later!

 
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04-15-09, 06:58 PM   #14  
Posted By: marksr "There are soap nozzles available that will throw the suds as high as 20' up and that same nozzle can be switched to apply a wide band at close ranges, maybe a 2-3 ft. wide pattern. How can a sprayer come close to these options?"

That's what they make ladders for
As noted above, using a garden sprayer gives you better control of the cleaning agent. I'm not a big fan of high pressure - it's too easy to unknowingly cause damage. I always try to use the loest pressure that will do the job.


Apparently you've never been on a ladder using a strong pressure washer......

If you want to clean higher areas the best thing to do would be to buy an extension wand, that will allow you to work from the ground and still clean properly. The 0 degree nozzles are OK, but are too slow to cover large areas high up.

I sure can't agree that a dinky garden sprayer of any brand/type allows better control over a properly setup pressure washer. Let me guess..... the sprayer will be faster as well right...... whatever.

I do agree that using the lowest pressure needed for each job is the best way to go, but usually requires a bit of help from a cleaning solution of some sort to really maximize your effort. Later!

 
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04-16-09, 04:02 AM   #15  
IMO it's easier to use a PWer on a ladder with a little less pressure than to fight one of those wand extensions. Also it is usually best to use the PWer at a downward angle - makes it less likely to force water behind the siding. The lower pressure of the garden sprayer gives you better controll of where the cleaning agent goes.

It is true that I've spent a lot more time on ladders than most diyers and am probably more comfortable working off of a ladder than most.


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