chainsaw problem

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  #41  
Old 07-16-09, 07:46 PM
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I didn't see the are you're from, but around here you can get it done for a couple for a couple of bucks at the Farm and Home store. It only takes them about ten minutes on their machine. They sell Poulan and a couple of other brands.

They also use the Stihl chain from a roll. I get 20 inch chains there for the $17.00. I see yours is a 27 inch job, though, it surely has a much heavier gauge of link to go to the $40.00.

Roughly every two times you sharpen a chain you need to knock a small amount off the top of the gauge to keep it the same relative to the top of the tooth for which it's gauging. That gauge height is critical for optimum cutting performance. When you have a machine do that it's pretty accurate. Most chains that are hand filed have the wrong gauge height.

When you sharpen a chain yourself getting the edge on the tooth isn't too hard, but getting the gauge right is another matter. If you have a shop do the third time (frequency of setting the gauge) on a machine you'll have the right set on the gauge. The tooth and gauge are done at the same time.
 
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  #42  
Old 07-16-09, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by marbobj View Post
I didn't see the are you're from, but around here you can get it done for a couple for a couple of bucks at the Farm and Home store. It only takes them about ten minutes on their machine.
I''m from a small and relatively remote town in SE Alaska, and if they do have a machine at here at the local Stihl dealer that sharpens chains the guy didn't mention it (I didn't ask, probably should've) but I kinda doubt it. I would rather of spent a "couple of bucks" to just have him sharpen up my old dull chain, if possible, on a machine (if they had one), instead of buying a new one for 40 bucks. So why did you recommend that I just buy a new chain if maybe there would have been a likelihood that a shop could just sharpen up my old one for a couple of bucks (if I would have known to ask)?
Thanks marbobj
 
  #43  
Old 07-17-09, 06:09 AM
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I have to speak in terms of what I have always done with a normal amount of timber cutting. We cut firewood and hedge for fence posts in Southern Iowa - and quite a bit of it.

This isn't in terms of someone that just needs to cut a sprout out of the back yard.

When you start cutting you should always have a backup chain that's sharp and ready to use = two good chains. Pinching a saw in a standing tree cut can ruin a chain or break it or they get dull so you swap chains. A sharp chain will get you about an hour and a half of cutting. That's a lot and three hours of solid run time is about all anyone wants to do at one sitting. Loading, stacking, moving, etc. takes up the rest of the day.

When a chain wears, two things happen - the teeth get dull and need to be sharpened, at intervals the gauges need touched up, and finally, most important, the side lash of the chain gets greater. The latter allows the chain to throw or break.

When a chain comes off the saw a number of things can happen - the worst is it comes around to say hello to whoever is running the saw. That is why I never run a worn out chain.

If your old chain is serviceable (and I would ask the shop if it was too snakey to use), and you aren't using the saw a lot, you could get by with what you have.
 
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