E15: a nightmare to come in 2010?

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Old 12-04-09, 05:33 PM
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E15: a nightmare to come in 2010?

I have seen recently newspaper articles about the corn ethanol people trying to push E15 through the EPA and attempting to get a waiver. The EPA has delayed a decision until mid-2010. I have not followed this issue in detail for some time. I have a large Ariens snow blower, a garden tractor for mowing about two acres, a good lawn mower for edge mowing and steep slopes, a gas trimmer, a cultivator, and an edger. There is still no convincing science that E15 ethanol will be safe for this equipment. In fact the boat people have law suits even attacking the effect of E10 on their equipment. What will be the effect of E15 on my equipment?

The corn ethanol web sites say "no problem" everything will work fine. I guess my view is that a handful of corporations and wealthy corn growers will get a lot of benefit and people like me will pay the price if E15 is damaging. As usual, the gains are privatized and the costs are socialized. What do you know about this?
 
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Old 12-04-09, 08:46 PM
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E-15 will only work in flex fuel cars. E-15 will NOT work in a carbureated piece of equipment without a lot of modifications. EPA never tests this. They just say, that's a good idea. My Dad was driving out to Yellowstone, with his 24ft traveltrailer in tow behind his 1986 Dodge D150 w/ a 360 engine. He stopped for gas in Iowa and bought the cheapest gas. All he looked at was the price. He unknowingly filled up with gas-ahol (50-50 gas/ethonal). Good thing the land is flat there cause he barely had enough power to get moving. E-10 is bad enough. To do it right, they really should wait a few years to allow manufacturers to engineer new engines and for consumers to trade up. But, the government always has to dive head first into everything without doing ANY research at all.
 
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Old 12-05-09, 02:21 AM
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E10 is already a problem, and according to some reports causes more pollution in the long run anyway, so I don't know why all this is being pushed except that $$ is going in someones' pockets.
 
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Old 12-05-09, 05:45 AM
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The whole thing is part of the renewable energy program, which is a good idea, but I"m not sure on how they are going about it.

What Cheese is saying about the additional pollution is true and it doesn't have to do with the burning of it, but the processing of it. There have been problems in the ethanol plants.

In Iowa, the gasohol (which is the E10) has always been 10% ethanol and 90% petroleum based gasoline, except for the more recent E85, which is mostly ethanol.

The long and short of it is, what it does, even if it performs well, doesn't make a dent in the energy demands of the country. The main global argument against it is the amount of biomass it takes away from the food supply of the world.

For me, the biodiesel in the winter has been a lot more of a headache. It really only belongs in the southern states when sub zero temperatures hit. Unless you want to lace it with Arctic Express (which costs more than you're saving in the first place), you're sitting along the highway with a plugged filter.
 
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