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coleman generator


mikek996's Avatar
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01-03-10, 10:31 AM   #1  
coleman generator

I have a coleman generator that was given to me by my father in law when he moved down south. he put a new carb on it due to leaving fuel in it too long. I had to put a fuel pump on it due to leaking. it is a 5k watt 10 hp briggs and stratton engine. I cant seem to get this thing running right. the idle surges up and down a lot and for the most part if you tyr to run anything on it it stalls. i put the engine # in on b&s web site and there is instructions on how to adj carb but the carb on it doesnt have a idle mixture screw. it looks like a screw where it supposed to be, its a brass screw with nothing under it but a small hole going into the carb, and it looks diffrent from the pics, maybe the carb is wrong, not sure. this is the first generator i have owned so im not sure how it is supposed to work. when a load is on the machine shouldnt the idle kick up to compensate? how do I adjust the govenor? and there is a spring on the rod that goes from the govenor to the throttle which is not connected at 1 side. sorry for the long post but trying to put as much info in as possible. thanks in advance.

 
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01-03-10, 01:31 PM   #2  
The surging is an indication of a blocked fuel passage. Post the model and type number of the engine and more details may be available.

You may try adding SEA FOAM Motor Treatment to the gasoline. It sometimes will dissolve blockage in carburetors.

 
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01-03-10, 01:56 PM   #3  
generator model #pmo545212
engine # 19G412-1180E.
the carb is brand new I dont think it has a gallon of fuel run through it yet fuel filter not plugged and tried running it with the cap of the tank with no diffrence. but a friend of mine told me to check the jet in the bottom of the bowl for a restriction in a tiny hole in the side of it, havent done that yet, sick of working on it today.

 
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01-03-10, 04:56 PM   #4  
The surging does mean the engine is not getting enough fuel. If it ever had fuel put in it when the carb was replaced, even a cup full, it could be stopped up again no matter how little it has been used.

The governor is set at the factory and should not ever need adjusting again. I recommend leaving the governor alone, it's not the problem and you'll have to go back and reset it to factory specs one the carb problem is resolved.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

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01-03-10, 05:27 PM   #5  
one other observation i made while it is stalling down fuel spits out the intake of the carb. if i get some time tommorow i will pull the bowl off to get a look in there.

 
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01-03-10, 07:19 PM   #6  
The link below should help with the carburetor. To clean the carburetor correctly pay close attention to the detail in each step.

Disassembly of Walbro LMT Carburetor used on Briggs and Stratton Engines

 
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01-21-10, 09:50 AM   #7  
thanks for the link to the carb info it was very helpfull, I had some time last weekend to work on it and 2of the holes in the emulsion tube was plugged. so it runs pretty good now I just need to get a hold of a tach to set the rpm, but i have another question while i had it running last night the muffler was glowing not bright orange but could definately see it was getting very hot. is this normal or does it indicate a lean or rich running engine?

 
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01-21-10, 01:16 PM   #8  
A glowing muffler can be indicative of a lean running condition, but not necessarily. It depends on several unknowns like muffler type, engine load, ambient temp, etc... that can factor in. If it starts up easily and does not have any hint of a surge, especially immediately after a load is applied or removed, then I'd say the fuel mixture is sufficient and the glowing muffler is just a hot muffler.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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