Hydrostatic Transaxle Leak

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  #1  
Old 04-02-10, 02:47 PM
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Hydrostatic Transaxle Leak

Hi, all;

My '98 TORO Wheel Horse Series 265-H with Hydrostatic Drive has developed a steady drip of transmission fluid from the right rear axle, right where it exits the transmission.

My Repair Manual shows the bushing, seal, and small parts needing replacement, but it obviously involves pulling the transmission apart to get at it.

Naturally, opening up the transmission case after quite a few years calls for changing out the filter and fluid, and the bushings on the other side and on the drive belt pulley up above, and do anything else that looks worth doing in there, but . . .

. . . is this the kind of thing a home repair guy ought to try, or is it nuts to even consider?

There's some rather specific torque specs for various bolts, and it sure looks like the kind of thing you'd want to do with the tractor up about six feet off the floor, and I have neither capability here at the farm.

Why, even my two twin sisters can't lift it that high for the length of time needed.

Is this strictly a dealer repair kind of thing, or can it be a DIY repair?

What do the experts think?

Thanks,

Antifa
 
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  #2  
Old 04-02-10, 03:37 PM
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A DIYer can do it if you have the time and means to do it.
It sounds like you don't have the equipment to do it meaning a way to lift the tractor off the ground. Plus are you prepared to replace parts that look usable, but show wear?
The way to this would be to remove the transaxle and work on it on the bench.
It all comes down to how much down time do you want?
 
  #3  
Old 04-02-10, 05:35 PM
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I'm not an Xpert, but you have substantial doubts and reservations about your ability, tools and equipment.

That sounds reasonable to me.

You might consider looking around on Craigslist or wherever for another such beast you can buy for cheap and remove the whole transmission.
 
  #4  
Old 04-03-10, 07:10 AM
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Druthers . . .

Thank you for your replies, gentlemen.

Rebuilding the hydrostatic transmission on the bench seems in order, either here or at the dealer. All the local shops are booked a month out, so this won't happen real quick in either location. This will take a good chunk of April to get done.

Clearly time to look at druthers and options --

Thing is, every inch of my growing space is terraced slopes and raised beds, so a narrow (36") and quiet riding machine I can maintain myself is what I'm after, long term. I'm not a flat ground, traditional farmer. I never mow, till, dig or plow -- just compost and layer and mulch and harvest. I haul stuff. Up and down long rows between raised beds, towing a little utility trailer.

Honest -- the only level ground on my place is the kitchen floor, and I'm not 100% certain about that. A bigger tractor is beyond useless around here, more likely to perform somersaults than useful work, more likely to cause erosion problems than help my growing method.

So I value the narrow frame and simple transmission of this riding mower. Not so much the gas engine. In fact, my long term plan is to convert from gas powered to electric by mounting batteries and a golf cart DC motor on the front end.

Ideally, I'd like the 'electric equivalent' of a 20+ HP vertical shaft engine on this Wheel Horse frame and transmission, using either 24V or 48V batteries. I could see removing the gas tank and lowering the seat and steering wheel, too.

Anyone have any resources or experience in putting a DC motor & batteries on a riding mower?

Maybe I'd do better to start from scratch, and put four DC motors on four separate wheels -- maybe build a low-slung, over-powered electric go cart, geared for torque instead of speed?

As the politicians like to say, 'all options are on the table' here.

Yeah, it sounds nuts but after you're all done chuckling, how might a fella go about doing this? Some large repairs are in order here, so maybe it's time to go all the way and spend the money and time on converting this frame or another to electric drive.

Has anyone done this?

Thanks for any advice,

Antifa
 
  #5  
Old 04-03-10, 07:51 AM
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I found a picture of your lands....


Google Image Result for http://www.asianethnicartifacts.com/mx_DSC00850_terraced_fields.jpg



Interesting ideas. Sounds like a lot of work.


Is this a large garden for your own use? And what kind of crops do you produce?
 
  #6  
Old 04-03-10, 08:37 AM
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Nice picture!

That's obviously a picture of hand-built and hard-worked terracing.

I have 15 acres of oak woods in North Carolina, of which about 5.5 are raised beds on south-facing slopes. It's the traditional Piedmont 'holler' land, with slopes rising up on either side of a meandering creek.

Nothing but terracing and raised beds would work here. Avoiding erosion is a constant concern. We grow everything that will grow, in wildly mixed beds, stressing permaculture systems including carp ponds just to harvest the fish poop in the water.

Electric fencing everywhere to keep critters and deer to a reasonable level of participation.
 
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